Oatmeal blood sugar spike

Common Questions and Answers about Oatmeal blood sugar spike

blood-sugar

These are the foods that cause your blood sugar to spike. Concentrate on green veggies, salads, proteins like chicken, fish, red meat, nuts. They say whole grains and oatmeal are good for you, but I don't agree as they also can cause blood sugar spikes. If you want something sweet, Atkins bars are delicious and they won't spike your blood sugar. Good luck to you!
The sweetness/healthiness of your milkshake depends on the ingredients. If you're using ice cream, then yes, it will be really sweet and not at all healthy. Why not try a protein shake, rather than a milkshake? Try a scoop of vanilla protein powder with 1/2 cup milk and 1/2 cup water, 1 cup frozen fruit chunks... blend and enjoy. Protein will keep you feeling fuller longer and it won't spike your blood sugar like a regular milkshake will do.
3. I am so confused. How could my blood sugar spike when I was really watching what I ate, hardly any carbs at all. I do not think I have been taking in 800 calories a day. Could I have put my body in shock from such a restrictive diet? Up to my 2nd blood test I did not eat any meat, had oatmeal for breakfast - a can of sardines at 11:00 am (or low fat cottage cheese & an avacado) and 2 pieces of fish for a late lunch, and soup at night with a salad.
For example-- things like breads, potatoes, pasta, crackers, white rice, etc [foods made with white flour], can cause a drastic rise in your blood sugar if you aren't careful. [They are converted to sugar after you eat them]. Other foods/drinks to avoid [example; dairy milk, fruit juices, energy drinks, Vitamin water] can also cause blood sugar to rise [so serving sizes and moderation are important].
my blood pressure 160/110 mg/dl I went to my Doctor and gave me glucophage and I returned to my previous diet and I have a 0 urine sugar level blood pressure 140 /93 mmHg . but my Fbg becomes highest in the morning and lowest at bed time 260 FBG morning and 180 mg/dl at bed time. ( I am on 0 carb diet and I lost so far 10 kgs of my weight.
For diabetics, their body does not respond to the elevated blood glucose adequately. They need to control their blood sugar with changes to diet and exercise and often medication. Do you take any medications for your blood glucose? If you do not understand what changes you need to make, you should speak to your doctor about what is recommended for you specifically. Your doctor may have a sample diet menu or be able to recommend a nutritionist to help you understand the proper diet.
I made some changes to my diet, started walking almost every day, made sure that I was drinking water more frequently and upon a friend's suggestion stopped taking the pill for diabetes. In the subsequent two blood test over a period of six months, my sugar levels were normal. During my next visit, I confessed to the doctor I stopped taking the diabetes pill. The doctor was not overly surprised and was happy that my sugar levels were under control.
Then I discovered it was worse after eating sugar. So I had an oral glucose tolerance test done in January. My blood sugar was a little high, but not diabetic (around 130). My doc said I was borderline diabetic and to eat small meals low in carbs high in protein. I did this and also cut out all refined sugars and carbs. I can't even eat high sugar fruits, I mainly just have berries. When cutting out sugar I wasn't thirsty all the time, and I was less dizzy.
which all seem to really spike my blood sugar. I usually have one slice of whole grain bread a day. Checked my BS this am before my breakfast - 14.1, only a handful of unsalted peanuts at 9pm last night. Breakfast - oatmeal with milk, an egg, half a Mandarin orange and coffee. Will check in a couple of hours and see what's what. And I have wondered if I have not been diabetic for a long, long time and perhaps that no matter how hard I try, meds may be what I need to do.
I went and bought a meter (the relion prime) because I feel that bad, well if i have allot of carbs like oatmeal or subway i spike at 150-160 then fall down to 70-mid 80's.. normal readings for high carb intake.. well fasting blood sugar has been as low at 67 some days, when i had lab check ups i ate two pancakes before getting blood drawn for complete blood panel etc.. well my glucose on that was 68 and i had the pancakes 1 hour before.
I also seem to have a lower tolerance for carbs in the morning. Cereals always spike my blood sugar. I prefer scrambled eggs with sauteed onions. Limit the morning carbs. Cereals are generally bad news, though she may want to experiment with things like oatmeal, which maybe slower digested. FOr all of us it's a matter of experimenting. Working out how many carbs we can handle and what foods work for us. Eat and test and then modify diet until targets can be reached.
I have GD and I meet with a nurse about every 2 weeks or so to go over my meal log. They would like me to eat 30-45 grams of carbs for breakfast, 15-30 for snacks in between meals, 45-60 for lunch and 45-60 for dinner. There are a bunch of veggies and some other foods that are considered "free foods" meaning they don't spike your blood sugar at all and someone will go over all of that with you. Avoid soda, cereal, and sweets as they tend to cause a spike.
BTW. I used to be a personal trainer. If you are weight training for 2 hours a day and concerned with diabetes, I'd change your split and do about 1 hour a day. After an hour of heavy weight training, your testosterone will lower, and cortisol will raise to give you energy. Cortisol screws with insulin, and raises glucose levels. So if you eat a revovery meal after with carbs, and that cortisol is still in your systems, it will spike blood sugar.
If they are not *whole grain* (eg whole grain bread and brown rice) you are missing the fiber and many other vital nutrients found in complex carbs, and practically guaranteeing a rapid spike in blood sugar. For breakfast, add a tablespoon of nut butter (almond butter is more nutritious and more easily digested vs. peanut butter) to your whole grain toast, or a slice or two of lean turkey bacon or turkey sausage. What about eggs? They are an excellent inexpensive protein source.
Fasting blood sugar: 79 1hr blood sugar: 81 2hr blood sugar: 71 At that point I had been feeling very similar symptoms. My doctor said my pancreas may be overproducing insulin, particularly because he expected higher numbers after 1 and 2 hours. Changing my diet and engaging in more exercise eventually eliminated the symptoms. Since that point, I've lost nearly 14 lbs, mostly due to dietary changes due to gastroparesis (post viral idiopathic; this has since started to clear).
For instance breakfast cereal, even oatmeal, low-sugar stuff--instantly turns into sugar. White breads do too etc. You need complex carbos (whole grain) and you need to always combine protein in every meal (eggs, cheese, meat, nuts). You get dizzy if you spike too high. I don't know why if you are 'border' line they don't just give the monitor so you can do the diet and KNOW if you are okay.
If you immediately feel better after eating something, then it is likely that your blood sugar was low. The worst triggers of these episodes are foods that cause a big spike in insulin production. The reason for this is that some foods, like sugary things, cause rapid rise of the blood sugar. In the normal person this cause the body to secrete a burst of insulin to bring the blood sugar down by making it available to the cells as fuel. This is the main role of insulin.
The fruit salad is probably not such a good idea for every meal/snack, because fruit contains a lot of sugar, even though it's a natural sugar. When you eat things with that much sugar, it causes your blood sugar to spike, which in turn causes your pancreas to pump out insulin. Whatever sugar you don't use up right away, is shuttled by the insulin, right into fat cells. Protein and fat are what make you feel satisfied and keep you feeling fuller longest.
The higher the rating on the index, the more rapid the increase in blood sugar level. The spike doesn’t last very long and is followed by a corresponding fast drop in blood-sugar level. (often it drops even lower than it was before we ate). This is commonly referred to as the “spike and crash syndrome.” Make sense? So, Gus, the bottom line is to pay attention to what you eat. The unfortunate part of diabetes is we have to give up and avoid many foods we once ate.
I am learning to juggle my diet so my blood sugar doesn't spike (from starving myself) - my morning blood sugar reading has always been under 125 since I have started testing, but my A1C is high. My last blood test was the end of December (7.3) - and when it was 6.9 I was eating whatever I wanted (before dieting). My blood sugar 2 hours after eating is usually under 125 too....I testing my blood the other day: 89 and a minute later -- 95 and then another minute later 111.
The problem with dry food and diabetes is tha certain grains cause a blood sugar spike and then drop which is hard to regulate blood glucose between meals for diabetes. This is more of a problem with lower grade food that uses high level of grains in their foods. Human diabetic patients need to limit carbohydrates to gain the best control of their disease. There are some grains that are much better and those include oatmeal, barley and rye.
it is important to eat and drink. you will wind up in the hospital hooked to iv tubes to treat dehydration. small sips every 10 minutes. suck on ice chips if necessary. drink ginger ale, small sips.
What Is Cholesterol? We may associate cholesterol with fatty foods, but most of the waxy substance is made by our own bodies. The liver produces 75% of the cholesterol that circulates in our blood. The other 25% comes from food. At normal levels, cholesterol actually plays an important role in helping cells do their jobs. But cholesterol levels are precariously high in more than 100 million Americans.
And, honestly, it hasn't been that bad. Oceanv - my MD has me on fewer carbs because that is what tends to spike my blood sugar. I'm supposed to keep it at 30-45 per meal - especially in the morning. They wanted me to have less carbs in the morning and no fruit or milk because of the natural sugars in them. Have you discovered yet what spikes your sugar? Like I said, for me it's potatos and pasta! (Unfortunately, spaghetti is one of my cravings!
No rice, pasta, white flour, sugar, or any other of the higher glycemic empty carbs are in that list, because such foods spike blood sugar and cause weight gain. Based on your food selection, an 11-day diet plan is computed for you by an online software, the “Diet Generator”, which can beaccessed from any computer at any time. What Does the Diet Generator Do For You? The Diet Generator: •Shifts your calories every few days forcing fast weight loss to happen.
I wasn't trying to say that you pig out all the time, but sweet food of any type is an issue because of the spikes it causes in your blood sugar. Excess sugar in the blood is converted automatically to fat if it's not used immediately. Ironically, low-fat foods can be worse as the fats (which weren't necessarily bad anyway, although they probably are in icecream) are often replaced with sugars. Wheat - whole wheat anyway - is good for digestion if you're not intolerant to it.
No rice, pasta, white flour, sugar, or any other of the higher glycemic empty carbs are in that list, because such foods spike blood sugar and cause weight gain. Based on your food selection, an 11-day diet plan is computed for you by an online software, the “Diet Generator”, which can beaccessed from any computer at any time. What Does the Diet Generator Do For You? The Diet Generator: •Shifts your calories every few days forcing fast weight loss to happen.
Your body can't compensate for activity with no added carb, and you can drop low (this number wasn't low though) Then you had a large spike after being given the glucose and then faded back to normal -safe range after the sugar/carbs left your system.
Want it in English? Their blood sugar still goes whack. That means, with fluctuating blood sugar levels, that they can't control their appetite. That means - you got it - weight gain. Our bodies don't differentiate between "good" carbs and "bad" carbs. That's the whole problem. A sugar is a sugar once it hits your mouth and begins its way down the digestive tract. It has the same physiologic effects, and for many people, insulin still can't be regulated.
It is a condition where at first your body can not adjust your sugar intake properly which results in too low blood sugar which results in your falling asleep. Please google Reactive Hypoglycemia .... also a medical term called " Dumping" Yes, that is a genuine medical term. Good Luck.
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