Niacin slow release

Common Questions and Answers about Niacin slow release

niaspan

I am taking over the counter SLO NIACIN 500mg now and want to take at least 1500mg or 2000mg, but I keep reading about slow niacin, immediate release niacin, Niaspan, extended release niacin. I keep reading about the problems of having the heavy doses of Niacin in my liver so much that it is dangerous. So my question is I don't know how to take Niacin and what kind to take. And how long to take. My whole idea of this is to not have another stroke.
Be sure to use the FLUSH TYPE niacin - I've done a lot of research on niacin and I'm taking it now using twin labs 1000 mg three times a day- Much research has shown that the no flush niacin the time release niacin or the slow-release niacin has little or no effect on triglycerides cholesterol HDL so always use the flush type which is hard to find these days
I am taking over the counter SLO NIACIN 500mg now and want to take at least 1500mg or 2000mg, but I keep reading about slow niacin, immediate release niacin, Niaspan, extended release niacin. I keep reading about the problems of having the heavy doses of Niacin in my liver so much that it is dangerous. So my question is I don't know how to take Niacin and what kind to take. And how long to take. My whole idea of this is to not have another stroke.
I have been taking slow release niacin for 6 months to help with chlolestorol today i also took potasium and magnesium and zinc which i had never done within 20 minutes my face started burning and then my arms neck and stomach and bright red with small welps i took benedryl real quick and called doc said not to ever mix potassium and niacin Iwas scared to death the intense fire feeling and swelling in face and crazy redness now im wiped out from the benedryl so it might be a vitamin you
You can try alphalipoic acid (from a health food store), omega-3 fish oil (1000mg a day), slow-release niacin (opens microcirculation) and keeping tight control over blood sugars.
research will advice the use of FLUSH niacin only for HDL , Cholesterol and triglycerides!!! As the slow-release niacin and the time release niacin have very little if any effect on what you're trying to achieve!!!
You should ask yourself whether or not you should be taking any cholesterol reductions medications at all, other than slow-release niacin. I suggest you do a search on google for the Scientific American article on cholesterol drugs Oct 25, 2011.
niacin vitamin, the type with slow release, also double check online there is a type of niacin which doesn t work i dont remember the name (its the one without red skin effect) liposomal gsh from livonlabs fish oil, epa+dha 2g minimum daily vit d3 5000iu or higher according to your blood levels
Starting in July 2007 I followed this suggestion, taking 1,500mg slow-release niacin with the Lipitor. I have biannual blood tests. The past three tests, 7-07, 12-07, and 6-08 showed my cholesterol to be 149, 85, and 57mg. LDL 65, 26, and 16mg. Triglycerides 183, 29, and 36mg. HDL 47, 53, and 34mg. These were dramatic improvements, except for the HDL. I am advised the 'good' cholesterol range is 50-200mg. If mine goes below 50mg in the next test do I have a problem?
You need a color dopplar view of both legs for a definitive diagnosis. 1000 mg of omega-3 oils and slow-release niacin will be helpful. Frequent exercise helps, as well as a quinine sulfate pill. Unfortunatey the FDA banned sale of quinine sulfate (sold fror 100 years over-the-counter), but it is still available in some health food stores.
So these two strategies really have worked for me thus far. BTW- I take the NON-slow release Niacin right out of the bottle...not Niaspan...but from what I understand they are the same thing. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments...hopefully this regimen will keep my lipids in good shape...
Years ago I assisted in writing the NDA on calcium channel blockers and this was one of the findings in the literature presented to me. Secondly you can obtain slow-release niacin which helps scrub deposits off the pressure sensors in the left and right carotids, as do pomegranite supplements. 1000 mg a day of omega-3 fish oils somtimes drop the pressure by several points also. The problem is not the upper number, but the lower number, which is not what it should be.
Many diabetic clinics provide such testing for free. You might try some alpha-lipoic acid, 1000 mg of omega-3 fish oil, and some slow release niacin. The niacin improves the microcirculation, as does the omega-3 fish oil. If you are paying cash and specify you only want an hba1c and a fasting glucose test it shouldn't be very expensive. To evaluate the thyroid a test known as a TSH is required. This is also inexpensive.
They are caused by the peripheral vasculature not contracting as the person stands, however almost always dehydration is a contributing factor. Slow release niacin is available without prescription and will assist with circulatory problems. Omega-3 fish oil supplements will also help.
In some cases there is a surgical option. Slow-release niacin is a vasodilator, and you might want to consult with your physician about prescribing Lisinoprol. This is a blood pressure control medication, but it opens up blood vessels and improves circulation. Also a baby aspirin a day, vitamin D3, a calcium supplement, and omega-3 fish oils. You also need a diabetic work-up to include an hba1c.
The heart medication Lisonopril is sometimes prescribed because it relaxes the blood vessels, as does slow-release niacin and omega-three fish oils. I wouldn't worry too much, but I would get a vascular consult.
my husband said he had that problem but when he got the slow release he doesn't notice those side effects much, sometimes the itching is all.
Starting with a lower dose and then gradually increasing it as may taking the supplement with food. Slow-release niacin and products made from nicotinamide (or niacinamide) and inositol hexanicotinate are also less likely to cause this reaction. at doses over 1,500 mg (1.
It involved moving a small circular vibrating metal disc over the surfaces of your leg while the disc emits and receives ultrasonic sound which is displayed on a CRT and recorded. If the problem is with the micocirculation slow-release niacin will be helpful is assisting with circulation. If you smoke, you must stop immediately. The carbon monoxide inhaled will reduce the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Generally, an evaluation by a vascular specialist is suggested.
A blue hand suggests circulatory deficiency. I wouldn't be too frightened, If you are a smoker, stop smoking. Slow-release niacin helps to open microcirculation. Hawthorne supplements also assist with microcirculation. 1000 mg a day of omega-3 fish oil will also help. If it continues it might pay to have a color dopplar of the arm, just to make sure there is no arterial blockage.
recently I started taking care of my 67 year old cousin , I have noticed alot of things I think are concerning , 1st he eats all the time 2nd he just goes to bed and sleeps anytime of the day (says he is cold) 3rd he has stated to me that he has had diarhea for about two months, 4th he has frequent attitude changes for really jolly to really hateful and most of the time he acts like he is trying to find the bad in things or simply trying to start a arguement 5th he overloads himself on the foll
1000 mg of omega-3 fish oils and a slow-release niacin tablet once a day will help with microcirculation. Take special care to insure your hba1c is within normal limits. Alpha-lipoic acid supplements have been anecdotally recommended to assist in stopping nerve damage. From the standpoint of the literature, the jury is out.
So these two strategies really have worked for me thus far. BTW- I take the NON-slow release Niacin right out of the bottle...not Niaspan...but from what I understand they are the same thing.
There are various options available to increase circulation. Circulatory problems may be relieved in some cases by taking slow-release niacin and 1000 mg of omega-3 supplements. Finally there are prescription-only quinine sulfate tablets, which were available over-the-counter until about 2005.
By reducing LDL, heart disease patients may prevent future heart attacks, prolong their lives, and slow down or even reverse cholesterol buildup in the arteries, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Treating High Blood Cholesterol When a patient without heart disease is first diagnosed with elevated blood cholesterol, doctors often prescribe a program of diet, exercise, and weight loss to bring levels down.
He should report to the prison infirmary, and request compression stockings. He should also ask for long-acting slow release niacin, which is in the prison system. Unfortunately they usually don't permit outside medications,, even non-prescription to be mailed. The care in Pennsylvania is worse than in most states. He should document his visits and the lack of care and complain through the system. This may or may not bring results, but it should be done.
Immediate release is the least harmless to the liver, next Extended-release also known as Niaspan-prescription, and most harmful to the Liver is Time release. slo release, etc.-IF YOU CAN BUY IT WITHOUT A PRESCRIPTION AND BOTTLE HAS TIME OR SLOW OR ANYTHING ELSE ON IT ABOUT HOW THE NIACIN IS RELEASED, then you have the hardest one on your Liver like I AM TAKING RIGHT NOW.
I'm wondering if my peripheral neuropathy, finally diagnosed this fall, could be related to taking large doses of slow release niacin for cholesterol control. The neuropathy arose (coincidentally?) after I began taking increased doses of the niacin (1500 mg/day)per my doctor after small doses had no effect on the cholesterol. I've had the emg/nerver conduction tests that are positive for peripheral neuropathy but the blood and urine tests that have turned up nothing.
1) Nialor (Instant release Niacin) - 3*500mg - You could use any other brand. 2) Oats + 10 almonds + 1 walnut for breakfast - 5 days a week.
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