Narcolepsy sleep disorder

Common Questions and Answers about Narcolepsy sleep disorder

narcolepsy

Hi, they are two different entities. Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnagogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. Central sleep apneas are caused due disorders or lesions in the brain. The peripheral system does not get the right impulses for respiration and hence the stoppage of respiration. As a result the person is aroused from sleep. Regards.
Hello and hope you are doing well. This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. Narcolepsy is diagnosed by the sleep onset REM episodes (SOREMs), wherein the person goes into the dream phase or REM cycle soon after sleep onset.
Hi everyone. I am not familiar with Narcolepsy or sleep disorders in general but my sleep has always been different. Typically, I fight daytime sleepiness with caffeine. In prior years, the caffeine has been a lot but I’ve lowered it significantly.
They usually help me. How much sleep at night is suggested? My doctor said there are two narcolepsy genes and I have one gene but without the other I am not necessarily predisposed to narcolepsy. I had an unlcle who used to fall asleep standing up. Any thoughts on this? One last question: in addition to the cataplexy, I also seem to have a chronic muscle ache mostly in my legs.
I was told by a sleep disorder doctor that tested me for sleep apnea that I didn't have sleep apnea but it was narcolepsy. He never told me what I needed to do about it. Do you also know if people with this disorder have periods of sleep walking. I have walked in my sleep from time to time since I was a child but it seems to have suddenly multiplied in the last few years. I am now 56 and have had some very life changing events in my life during these last 3-4 years.
I've been reading about narcolepsy, and although my sleep study did not indicate anything about it, I find one of its symptoms prevalent in my experience. Often, I seem to dream right when I fall asleep - not after the 90 minutes it's supposed to take to reach REM. I know this is true because I'll wake up only a half hour after falling asleep having already dreamt. Does anything other than narcolepsy cause this?
Also excessive sleepiness is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. You will need to consult your primary care physician, who may schedule you for a polysomnogram (sleep test) to rule out sleep disorders and initiate appropriate therapy.
Does anything other than narcolepsy cause this? I have a slight anxiety disorder - can this cause this abnormal sleep architecture?
He then suggested that the two could co-exist in the same patient. One strong indication of narcolepsy in a sleep study is early- or sleep-onset REM sleep. You won't know about this without a sleep study as there is no real way to tell. As soon as I saw the graphs and report of my patient's 'sleep architecture', it was obvious that we could rule out narcolepsy. He had, in fact, very delayed REM sleep, and none without CPAP treatment.
These are real symptoms to a sleep disorder. Don't let anyone have you think you have mental problems or you're being visited by demons. The brain does amazing things trying to cope and this is just one of them. Good luck and let us know what the clinic says!
For the past 30 years (I'm 53), my doctor had been treating me for "excessive daytime sleepiness" that was so bad that it was ruining my life; after a 2 night sleep/daytime nap study at a major university, the results were still "disorder or excessive sleepiness" or "similar to sleep-attack narcolepsy, but not REM-onset". No drug other than the stimulant ritalin helped, so I took that for almost 30 years and all was well.
Hello and hope you are doing well. The excessive sleepiness could be due to narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. Do you have these other symptoms? Narcolepsy is diagnosed by the sleep onset REM episodes (SOREMs), wherein the person goes into the dream phase or REM cycle soon after sleep onset.
We diagnose this entity by a sleep study, MSLT, or sleep onset latency. Whether you have narcolepsy I can't tell from what you indicated over the internet. Beta blockers have a known side effect of tiredness or a fatigue. Whether this is the cause or simply adding to your sleep disease is currently unknown without knowing more, your neurologist should be able to answer this for you.
I am not pregnant. My problem is that I sleep constiently. I sleep like I am on drugs or something. I can be up for a few hours maybe all day but out of no where i just feel like i need a nap? help. I am not depressed but i keep thinking I need to see a dr.
5 nights of 7) and has other symptoms consistant with Narcolepsy or sleep deprivation (but no overt cateplexy yet). Almost every other differential diagnosis has been 'excluded', although only one of the docs consider narcolepsy as truly possible because of his age. He's had 3 abnormal EEG's and an overnight EEG that didn't catch much.
4-Polysomnography, with simultaneous monitoring of EEG, eye movements, heart rate, respiratory effort and airflow, oxygenation, and muscle tone, is used to confirm that you do not sleep apnea/ hypoxemia causing thr jittry movements and the muscle cramps and pain its also useful in diagnosing narcolepsy or suspected periodic limb movements, nocturnal epilepsy, REM sleep behavior disorder, and other parasomnias.
An infectious disease specialist told me last fall that he thought I had CFS (scary) but when I saw a rheumatologist who works with CFS patients, she thought I might have a sleep disorder. I'm getting a sleep study tomorrow night. Did you ever see a doctor?
I was pretty much diagnosed with narcolepsy today, the doctor said he just needs me to do a sleep study so there's physical proof kinda thing. My symptoms were Hallucinations, Falling Asleep and Sleep paralysis. But while he was asking me questions and such he said "can I look at your hands?" So I said sure and for years I have been biting the skin around my nail, just because it bothers me..
I started goin to school for medical and learned that maybe it could have been a sleep disorder narcoplepy or whatever,untill one day it happen to my lil sister 14 at the time,she ran in my room scared crying didnt want to go back to sleep,i mean if this is a sleep disorder why can there be bad feelings,why you feel something spritual? why when i prey at night it wouldent happen to me? why when i wasent thanking god for this lil things in life that it would happen to me?
I suggest you see your physician to be tested for sleep apnea, narcolepsy or an adrenal issue. Any of those can cause the symptoms you describe. I have both central sleep apnea, my brain forgets to tell me to breath and I have Addison's Disease. They both cause me to fall asleep at the drop of a hat, have strange dreams though mine are usually night terrors that I either feel paralyzed from and can't wake up or I wake up screaming. I also had to give up driving until I was under control.
I did an extensive literature search and spoke to a sleep specialist colleage, but could not find any reports of Tourette's associated with narcolepsy. Although Tourette's is associated with sleep disorders, they're usually related to the inability to sleep and arousal disorders rather than narcolepsy.
Ideally you would have an overnight sleep study followed by an all day nap study to be assessed for narcolepsy. It is possible to have other sleep disorders that result in symptoms that mimick narcolepsy. That happened with me. I may still have a mild case of narcolepsy, but the worst of the symptoms have responded to treatment of the other disorders. I personally would want to know if I was in danger of having a sleep attack and hurting myself or someone else.
I am waiting to do a sleep study next month to find out if I have narcolepsy or some other problem. The reason I am finally getting tested is I just tired and run down every single day which makes life very hard since I have 2 boys with slight disabilities and jam packed with energy. I quit work mainly to be with my boys but also because I have a hard time getting up and could not function well at work. Before seeing a sleep specialist, I thought I was only waking up a couple times at night.
I haven't gone for another sleep study since, nor has my doctor seem to ever remember that I have narcolepsy. I am his only patient with narcolepsy, and if I ever end up in his office, it seems like he always forgets that I have narcolepsy. I don't believe he has a good understanding of this. Any suggestions. I am in the process of trying to switch my doctor, but in the meanwhile, I have been more tired lately than usual. I take 400mg provigil and 40 mg ritialin daily.
So my doc has said that I have Cataplexy, but the MSLT and Sleep study I had a few years ago was negative. I have also never shown any symptoms of Narcolepsy, no EDS, no sleep paralysis or hallucinations. I was wondering what the chances are of this being the case. I have a few other symptoms that we aren't sure whether they are unrelated or not. I lose nails. They fall off in one piece, like they just don't stay attached to my fingers and toes.
Narcolepsy is a CNS disorder and is thought to also be caused by an autoimmune disorder. Causes: current thinking is that a group of cells in the brain responsible for sleep-wake behavior is damaged or absent. (gosh do you think the MS lesions might also damage this area for people unlucky to have both!) Tests: The spinal fluid of most patients with narcolepsy shows the neuroprotein lacking or deficient. The neuroprotein is "hypocretin".
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