Namenda and dementia

Common Questions and Answers about Namenda and dementia

namenda

Dementia is very clinically specific and only a neurologist could distinguish between that and psychosis though dementia usually involves forgetfulness and memory loss. I do know that elderly relatives I have that were diagnosed with dementia improved with the medication Namenda.
Is there any kind of help for people in the first stages of dementia beside Namenda.? Is there anything in the health food stores that can be taken.? And does vitamin B1 help.?
My husbands friends mother is on something that is new and she is doing better... I would discuss this again with the doctor and even if nothing else, maybe a mild tranquliser for the daytime would help..The ativan is good for situational anxiety but maybe your mother needs something a little stronger to quiet the chatter in her mind. I don't like meds but sometimes in cases like this we just have to make them comfortable.
Your physician has your patient on three medications that interfere with memory and cognitive function, and then wants to suggest Namenda? The three meds prescribed are "chemical straightjackets", used in nursing homes to make patients more "managable". And this is a "neuro" specialist prescribing psychiatric medications. I would question the need for any of these meds, let alone all three of them. Yes, it is true that the patient will be more agitated.
She's not demented at all, however, and her memory continues to be good. She is eighty years old and now and then she forgets a doctor's appointment, but since she has six doctors that might be expected. I haven't had a one-on-one with her neurologist, though. She has to sign a HIPAA waiver first.
At this point, my Mom has been diagnosed with non-specific dementia and is taking Namenda. A neuropsychologist can also help test brain function which is important to see which functions are impaired. Those usually correlate with different types of dementia. Open communication is very important. You need to know what is going on. If your father has POA perhaps he can give permission for the doctor to call you as well.
Medications for Demential and Altzheimers are also not suitable for people who suffer from cardiovascular diseases, e.g. had a heart attach for example. People with Dementia and Altzheimers do get aggressive and this part of the illness. It is because they cannot express and put into words any more how they feel. They are not able to communicate properly because of damaged brain cells. As a carer, try and observe her facial reactions and her mannerisms.
He is delusional, on disability and is taking Zyprexa, Amantadine, Namenda, Cymbalta and excelon patch. Still, he seems to worsen. He now has symptoms of Parkinsons with balance issues. He is 55 years old - much to young to be this dibilitated. He was tremendously active, a college graduate who owned his own business. I just cannot accept that after beating all the odds and surviving we are now dealing with this. Do you have any suggestions?
A year and a half ago the doctor said he had the first stages of dementia. It seems to be getting worse. He is taking Namenda. He also has a heart condition and a lung condition. He is on oxygen 24/7. He is also a diabetic with kidneys not working properly. Will vitamin B1 help with his dementia.? or is there anything else he could take or do.?
My mother has advanced senile dementia. She is 89 and a half. She has other physical problems, but the most worrying right now is she finds it unbelievably difficult to swallow anything. Her throat, esophagus, and stomach were all examined thoroughly a few months ago (when she first mentioned she found it slightly hard to swallow) -and there was nothing physically wrong there! This is getting worse and worse. It is extremely hard to get nutrition into her.
r her symptoms indicative of vascular dementia. could 'namenda' 'clonazepam' help?
My father is an orphan and he/we do not know any of his familial history. He is 66 and is 100% disabled vet(mental) due to being a p.o.w for 19 months during the Vietnam war. He is scheduled for an MRI 12/29. My mom and I took him to his last appointment and some how my health became the topic.The fact that I had brain lesions and my own cognitive/neurological issues were of great interest to my dads doctors.... Maybe after his MRI he will have some answer and maybe I will too...... Theresa...
She has been in the health center now for 2 weeks - on 100 mg of zoloft, aricept, namenda, seraquil and can't walk, is more confused and very irritable to others. Not her normal personality. Her neurologist has just taken her off zoloft, aricept and namenda and increased her seraquil to 25 mg 3 times a day (was 25 mg once a day at night). I am hoping I am doing the right thing for her.
My Dad, who is now 85, was diagnosed with probable dementia and possible bipolar disorder in February. For decades, we've suspected he's bipolar and also may have a personality disorder (narcisstic personality). He lives out of the country (still refuses to move back) and now says he is only sometimes taking his diabetes pills (as well as his blood pressure and heart pills.) His moods the past month or so seem to vary more than ever before.
Also, I have trouble with anxiety and compulsive thoughts. My doctor has increased my Namenda and it seems to have helped things. I have had a few times which I forgot where I was and I have ongoing nightmares in which I am able to talk and react with wild movement. I also have involuntary movements that are compulsive in nature.
Parkinson's is linked to a special type of dementia called "Lewy's body dementia". These patients often become very paranoid (and critical of) their caregivers. Be prepared for this. The etiology of Parkinson's is unclear, however there is evidence some varieties are due to an HERV-W infection. In this case any immune stimulants are contraindicated. The problem is how to diagnose an HERV-W problem.
For the seizures I take trileptal, and keppra. The seizure meds make me very tired, and makes the thinking, and memory problems I have worse. If I dont take them the aricept, and namenda seemed to work better. Is it nessasary to take all of these drugs, even though it seems the seizure meds void the memory meds? Are people w/ tbi, more sensitive to the effects of medicine? Is there anything I can do to make the side effects less severe? Thanks for ant infomation.
Thank You, what happened was my father in law who lived on his own with PD, tripped and broke his hip before his 2 hour drive to come and visit us, he came out of the 1 hour surgery fine, they were giving him his PD meds, then the Hospital started giving haldol and 3 days later he was on full life support and by the following week he died, even a PDR says not to give haldol to a PD patient, they could not believe he lived on his own in a two story home and listed his death as a heart attack with
I would speak to a neurologist and a gerontologist as well for follow up. As for dementia Namenda is an effective treatment and has been helpful in my grandfather who has mild dementia and memory loss.
Yes my grandfather was prescribed Aricept for dementia as well and experienced similar side effects. His gerontologist changed him to Namenda which he found more tolerable. However each person responds differently to each medication. It would be worthwhile to let the doctor who is prescribing the medication know about these concerns so they can follow up within their clinical discretion.
He is on Namenda and Plavix, is it possible that Adderall could help with his short term memory loss. Before the accident he lived on his own.
Namenda is used for dementia and Altzheimers. Although the tests came back showing no signs of Altzheimers it does not mean that the 80 year old lady does not have dementia. I would discuss this with the doctor. Fluoxetine is another name for Prosac and this is an antidepressant. The doctor must have come to the conclusion that the lady does have depression for this to have been prescribed. I would keep a watch on your neighbour and report any side effects to the doctor.
My mom takes namenda and aricept. Are there any other treatments for Demensia out there that would help her any. I know it is not curable but maybe something that would help her some.
It states (including on the standard medication notices right here that come the prescription labels) that antipsychotics are to be used with extreme caution in people who are elderly with dementia. I would suggest speaking to a neurologist and gerentologist. They could decide specifically what to use but I know for many elderly people Namenda works well on age related dementia.
Namenda has been of use for people I know with dementia. You'd have to speak to a neurologist more about this. Physical pain would be treated with other medications. A gerontologist would be best to coordinate all of this. If things have worsened in the past few weeks I'd arrange a consultation right away to make sure there wasn't a mini stroke or any other concern that can happen among the elderly. Follow up with a specialist.
Ultimately my question is, is it safe to hop around different anti-depressants like this? Especially in someone who's 85 with advanced Parkinson's and Parkinson's dementia...
I do know some elderly family members who had dementia and had some symptoms like that and for them the medication Namenda was helpful but that decision should be made by a neurologist after an EEG and MRI and other exams that they would do to rule out other conditions. Also if it were to be dementia the cause of it would have to be determined.
Now since last 6 month he was totally on bed now he stop taking food from mouth. Here in India Doctors is saying that it's due to Parkinson and Dementia and you have to wait for his death only and you don't have any choice. I just want to know that is it possible that he again start to go bathroom and do atleast his daily activities. His age is only 50 year please help me.
Then if they diagnosed that they could determine what medication would be proper at that point but I know for many elderly people I've known who had minor dementia Namenda was helpful so you could ask about that if that's what is diagnosed.
and then dementia based on slow brain functioning as shown on an eeg. Today the medications are razadyne, namenda and lexapro and interventions include a personal trainer, a neuro-optometrist and an occupational therapist to offer strategies to improve independence at home. Speech therapy helps aphasia. I am not sure what lies ahead although I believe we can handle it. I just wish there was more that I could do to help improve the condition.
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