Multiple sclerosis hereditary neuropathy

Common Questions and Answers about Multiple sclerosis hereditary neuropathy

multiple-sclerosis

Three years ago, after years of attempting to ignore growing symptoms of pain and fatigue, and with increasing symptoms of twitches from my torso down, periodic pain in my right arm and hand, numb feet while running, uncontrollable toe-spreading, horrible nighttime nerve pain that made it nearly impossible to sleep for more than cat-naps at a time, and an overall feeling of regular "flu-like" exhaustion during the day, I went to my family practitioner, who after examining me thought I
The various causes of spinocerebellar atrophy or degeneration include stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, alcoholism, peripheral neuropathy, metabolic disorders, and vitamin deficiencies. Please discuss with your treating doctor. The first step in treatment is finding the cause. Take care!
Anderson-Fabry disease Hereditary types (I to V) Tangier disease Multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 2b) Idiopathic causes: Chronic idiopathic anhidrosis
Hi, The most common causes of tongue and lip numbness are – Hypocalcemia , Food poisoning , Hereditary neuropathy , Horseshoe crab poisoning , Hypoparathyroidism and Multiple sclerosis . There could also be a nerve impingement in the neck that could lead to such symptoms along with eye weakness . Please go for an MRI of the brain and spine with contrast and consult a neurologist and physician for the diagnosis and treatment . Hope this helps you . Take care and regards !
Causes could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. (3) If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
Also, there are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
Causes could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. (3) If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. (4) Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
I just assumed it was the hereditary spinal stenosis and disc problems in my family. I was recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. In my last attack, my stomach, patches on my back and legs were vaguely numb. However, my cervical MRI also turned up quite a bit of other neck problems, which included a mild spinal stenosis and several bulging discs. Does anyone know about both conditions and how do I tell which is from which? By the way, steroids totally got rid of my recent attack numbness.
Examples include patients with positive family history, very insidious symmetric course of the disease, or some atypical features, including lack of treatment effect. Hereditary neuropathy with predisposition to pressure palsies can be suspected and tested for in some patients. • Imaging studies can provide supportive evidence of CIDP. • MRI of the spine with gadolinium enhancement may show enhancement of nerve roots.
As I mentioned, there are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination of the patient. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
Also, there are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
(2) Symptoms present on one side of the body versus the other, or in just one limb. Causes could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. (3) Symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. (4) Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
(2) If your symptoms are present on one side of the body versus the other or in just one limb, this could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI which sounds like has already happened. (3) If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium.
) A neuromuscular specialist is a different sub-specialty of neurology that deals with tests such as EMG and nerve conduction studies, and treats conditions which may range from hereditary neuropathies to diabetic neuropathies to multiple sclerosis to muscular dystrophy and many more. Patients may see a neuromuscular specialist to diagnose neuropathy, evaluate the underlying cause of known neuropathy, or for ongoing monitoring of the condition--which is why I mentioned the specialty above.
Conditions involving the brain or spinal cord, like demyelinating diseases (multiple sclerosis), or chronic inflammation or infection, some types of strokes. . Certain hereditary conditions . Psychosomatic disease (related to stress or anxiety) can sometimes present with non-specific symptoms As you can see, a large spectrum of conditions can present with numbness.
Additionally, symptoms present on one side of the body versus the other, or in just one limb could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
Optic neuritis may be viral, may have no known cause, or may be a manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Most people who have one episode will recover their vision. While eye exam may be entirely normal, another test, called the visual evoked potential, which gives information as to how long electricity takes to move along the nerve, will be abnormal and will point to the diagnosis. Other causes of optic neuropathy, or problems with the optic nerve, that are not demyelinating, can also occur.
There are several causes of small fiber neuropathy, including diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, autoimmune problems The other type of sensory neuropathy is called a large fiber neuropathy. There are several categories of this type of neuropathy, and there are many many causes. Sensory neuropathies can involve just one nerve or several nerves in the body. The symptoms are sensory loss and if motor nerves are involved ,weakness.
, or gait instability due to a problem in part of the brain called the cerebellum, a genetic disorder such as spinocerebellar ataxia is one possibility. Multiple sclerosis is another disorder that causes sensory symptoms and gait instability. It sounds like you are going to be evaluated soon at a reputable university hospital, I strongly recommend you keep this appointment and I recommend continued follow-up with your physicians.
Treatment options for neuropathic pain include neurontin and lyrica. If your symptoms are on one side of the body/limb, conditions such as stroke or multiple sclerosis would be considered in the differential. An MRI of the brain and cervical cord would be recommended. If you have had trauma to your neck/head, it would be helpful to have an MRI of the cervical cord and brain to evaluate for a condition called syringomyelia.
If the diagnosis is confirmed and other causes are excluded, it can be safely said that the likelihood of progression or occurrence of a serious neurologic condition is low. Multiple sclerosis is a disease that primarily affects the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord, nerves from the eye, the optic nerves). Symptoms may be mild to severe, ranging from tingling and numbness to paralysis.
This excludes many serious causes that would lead to hand and leg symptoms, such as demyelination (as occurs in multiple sclerosis). Reversal of cervical lordosis of a mild degree is not significant. The other findings on your MRI of the c-spine show minimal protrusion of the disc (a small herniated disc), these are also not significant as it appears there is no pressure on the spine or the nerves as they exit the spine.
(2) Symptoms present on one side of the body versus the other, or in just one limb. Causes could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. (3) If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
There are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination of the patient. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
(2) Symptoms present on one side of the body versus the other, or in just one limb. Causes could include a stroke or the condition multiple sclerosis. These would best be excluded by an MRI. (3) If symptoms migrate (move from one place to the other) and are intermittent, causes might include seizures, migraine disorder or metabolic problems such as low calcium. Often these symptoms may reflect emotional/psychiatric problems related to stress (what is called somatization disorder).
As I mentioned, there are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination of the patient. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
As I mentioned, there are several other genetic, metabolic, and hereditary disorders that cause neuropathy, and what tests need to be ordered depend on the history and physical examination of the patient. With small fiber neuropathy, the EMG/NCS test which measures how nerves conduct electricity and how muscles respond to them may be normal. In large fiber neuropathy, it will be abnormal. Small fiber neuropathy can be diagnosed with a skin biopsy and with a test called a QSART.
Other potential causes include multiple sclerosis, a brain tumor, a vascular malformation, and spinal cord problems and others. These are all best evaluated with an MRI of the brain. It sounds like your neurologist found evidence of a neuropathy on EMG? If that is the case it is important for you to ask your doctor for more information about exactly what he/she means and what type of neuropathy you have. There are several categories of neuropathy, and there are many many causes.
Hi, I'm a 44 year old female and have been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis since 2001 from a small town neurologist. I have been seeing a retina specialist during this time due to optic neuritis. I recently changed neurologists @ WVU and he is testing me for Lebers Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. I haven't recieved the results on LHON yet. What I have read on LHON, instead of having MS it may be LHON Plus??
If autonomic dysfunction is diagnosed, there are treatments available to help prevent the blood pressure from inappropriately dropping with changes in posture. Multiple sclerosis would not typically present with isolated autonomic symptoms (other neurologic symptoms would be expected); also, MS is not hereditary.
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