Lyrica recreational use

Common Questions and Answers about Lyrica recreational use

lyrica

First, I'm not a doctor, so I don't want to give advice - just information. I also have Fibromyalgia and am taking Lyrica. Lyrica was developed for diabetic neurapathy, then authorized for treating FMS. I have a lot of other issues that cause pain (ddd, spinal stenosis, severe arthritis) and I've taken a lot of pain meds and gone through withdrawl for things like Hydrocodone, Percocet, and even Methadone. Second only to Methadone, Lyrica was the worst to withdraw from!
I had quit my casual wine w/dinner alcohol use a year ago in Feb., knowing my liver was in jepordy. I'm not a medicine person. I have respect for pills, never got into drugs, and didn't drink to get drunk. Only enjoyed a glass of red w/a fine steak. But with a combo of tolorance and an abusive 8 year marriage, I began to get out of control and hide my pain (emotional & physical) w/the lortabs.
but I found this warning during my research: Recreational use Although gabapentin is not a controlled substance, it does produce psychoactive effects that cause it to have potential for recreational use. Even in low doses, Gabapentin causes sensations of reduced acute pain, reduced anxiety and even a tendency to become overly social and talkative. Larger doses can cause the user to become numb and even fully insensate. It has also been called upon to reduce opiate withdrawal symptoms.
Baja California, Mexico. Hi, I hope somebody can help me. The reason why i'm here is because since a long time ago more than one year The reason why I am here is because for over a year and half I have suffered from infections and pain in the body multiple chronic conditions. The pain that I feel is so hard it can be sometimes in my back (lungs) like a muscle spasms. And sometimes I feel it in my Thoracic diaphragm like a electric shock along my body.
Because of the way it acts (like GABA), there are some psychoactive effects which have led to some recreational use and abuse. It would not be an incredibly high risk for abuse, and it SHOULD be tapered off upon discontinuation. One option is to give it a try and see how the pain responds. Of course, stay vigilant to how it makes you feel, although I don't think you'll have any issues there.
Pain relief IS a high concern and MH has a pain management forum specific to this. And,yes,there are members who became addicted from recreational use and turn to the forum for help. They know they're addicted and want desperately to change their lives. I've always maintained that if we,as consumers of medical care,are completely honest with our physicians and good historians,we would be properly cared for.
either they needed it at some point and it spiraled out of control or it started with recreational use. You don't fit into either category. You have been through so much and very recently...don't worry about what might happen in the future just take care of yourself today. Just make sure you always take your medicine the way you should and you won't have a problem. Good luck and I'm wishing you a speedy and full recovery.
The greatest medical and recreational use of opioids in the United States falls between these two extremes and is fostered by the prescription of opioid medications for chronic noncancer pain. What should be our policy that determines how and when to use opioids for our patients with chronic noncancer pain? The 2 articles in this issue of the Annals discussing opioid use and misuse illustrate the complexity of this question.
Let alone being able to comfortably make love to my husband or throw my arms around my sons neck. Recreational and sporting activities are pretty much out of the question. I know that somewhere out there - there is someone who can help. Please, let there be someone.
I was in the process of working with my GP to apply for approval for medical MJ from Health Canada, but moved to another city before it was done, so I need to restart the process with new GP or new neuro but not something I can bring up at first appt lest they think I'm a doctor shopping recreational user. I have also used Sativex, which is a synthetic form of THC in a mouth spray, but couldn't handle the taste or the mess it made of my mouth.
The doctor did not want to switch me to Ultram because she feels it will not work well since I have tried Lyrica before and that did not work. I am at a loss of what to do. I worry so much about how I am going to function on the long term rather than making day by day. I don't know if I should continue the Norco or try to come off of it to see what happens. I have a week off next week which would be the ideal time to detox if I am going to do it.
For some reason my body will not absorb it the way it should, so I must take supplements. There are other meds. that work for pain, which are not addictive. Lyrica, Neurontin or Cymbalta; but they can have some side-effects (as most drugs do). Ultram has a low potential for addiction and could get you past the break-thru pain. It's best to work with your physician about what would be the most effective treatment plan for yourself.
This is a horrible drug and I want to get off of it. Never took recreational drugs. The dr put me on the patches because my 78 year old mother went with me to an office appointment and told him I was not remembering to take my oral pain med. I was in so much pain from the post herpatic neuralgia I have from the shingles that I was unable to refuse at the time. My family has turned their backs to me since I became ill and no one will help me by taking care of me physically.
Honestly, I don't see how people use this med for recreational purposes. I guess it's because my body is used to it and it works for its purpose - to keep my pain bearable. I have read up on this surgery and the recovery time. Everyone's story I have read stresses that it is very painful after surgery and is a very long recuperation. The surgeon has told me I cannot return to work for at least three months. However, I believe he only prescribes Vicodin for post op pain.
Also they gave me Clonidine (which is a blood pressure med) for the same reason. In the past I've tried Lyrica and Neurontin. Lyrica didn't work much for me and both of them left me kind of foggy brained and unable to communicate well verbally, although the Neurontin did help with some of the nerve pain. They've also prescribed me a couple of gels to apply topically. I had Voltaren, which did give me a fair amount of relief but now they're trying me on something else.
At the very least, he should have immediately prescribed a good back brace to stabilize your spine, and he should have also prescribed opiate pain killers and the medicine Lyrica for nerve pain. The opiates would also help your RLS and the Lyrica would help your fibromyalgia. I am unsure about the benefit of physical therapy for you, mainly because your spine is so wrecked up.
In such cases, the twitches may be related to anxiety/stress, caffeine, and often occur after recent strenuous activity or muscle over-use. It is important in such cases to reduce stress/anxiety levels and to reduce caffeine intake. Tremors of the hands can be physiological that is exacerbated by stress/anxiety and caffeine.
i can feel the lyrica but i can fully function in my daily life. just straight up idk how but lyrica has got to be the best anti-depressant i've been on. but it has some nasty withdraw side effects that i don't think your Loved one could handle.
This person talking about having to take it for months to forever is wrong. However, I don't know if is advisable to stay on it longer with certain types of pain or people who more mentally addicted to it.Thier are people out there that do, but it is not a must. I just went through withdrawl on suboxone. I went about 18hrs before taking my first dose. I used heavy sleeping pills during these 18hrs to get through the intense withdrawl.
Unfortunately there are ppl that attempt to deceive physicians every day to obtain opiates for recreational use or diversion. The physician must be diligent in prescribing opiates or they face sanction or worse by the DEA or medical board of licensings. You apparently have documentation of required opiate use and the reasons for your CP. The new PMP should be less concerned with prescribing opiate medications or you. You have been treated by a PMP in the past which should be beneficial.
And I thought the short term use label meant that I should empty the bottle as rapidly as possible.....
I have also had a lumbar epidural, a thoracic epidural, and 5 trigger point injections. I have tried Lyrica, and Lidoderm patches as well as numerous NSAIDS, a low dose anti-depressant, narcotic pain relievers, and non-narcotic pain relievers. I'm currently doing accupuncture, seeing a chiropractor, a doctor for pain management, a doctor at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and I'm mdoing biofeedback.
I would never choose to use a medication if I knew I didn't need it--for the same reason that I eat healthy, don't use recreational drugs, etc. As I read others' posts I realize that maybe I do have a pretty good dr. She feels pretty strongly that this is either MS or a "pre-MS" type flair. Since my tests aren't confirming it she wants to check with me every few months. She's surely not writing me off or calling me crazy. My MRI was ordered my my GP with no contrast.
Have the doctors tried you on lyrica or cymbalta. Both are supposed to help with neuropathic pain? I have this horrible pain that you describe on the whole left side of my body. I don't have an MS diagnosis though as all my testing has come back normal. How did they diagnose MS? Do you have brain lesions?
The program he suggested to me is really designed for recreational drug users. They use adivan and some other anti-nausea drugs as needed but it is basically a six day, residential, cold turkey program, The counselor that I talked to at the program said that he did not really think it was appropriate for my situation because they didn't have any provision for dealing with underlying pain during withdrawal.
It seems more like pain than craving, and maybe that's the only good thing about following Dr's orders rather than purely recreational use, like booze was. No craving for people places and things, just a giant black hole of pain and despair. I gave the pistol to a friend as soon as I noticed it was staring at me like the geico money you'd save beastie. That helped a lot.
I never ask for a larger dose and I never use up my medication in the allotted time. I never take more than is prescribed. My doctor totally trusts me. Despite pain medication, I am left with daily, chronic pain. My leg muscles are so tired and achy at the end of the day, due to spasms, that I feel like I have run a marathon. I have endured, all that I can endure. I live each day in uncontrolled agony. I am only 54 years old.
Are you taking any over-the-counter medications? It's easy to see that Recovery requires us to avoid our drug of choice and other "recreational" mood/mind altering substances. However, I learned that I needed to avoid anything the had the effect of speeding me up or slowing me down. At the top of the list was Sudafed (or anything that contained pseudoephedrine). I thought this was probably over-the-top, not truly necessary advice.
they are basically controlling my life and at the worst point I was taking atleast 10 to 15 a day just to feel normal with no pain.i never thought in my wildest dreams that it would come to this.my doctor also gave me lyrica and to be honest I dont what kind of side effects theyre gonna cause also.i just want to live my life pill free and get back to the person I use to be.i really do appreciate all the advice from everyone.
drugs for recreational users, the victim is left chasing that initial high all day, and the mg total rises to obscene levels. I'm surprised that Dilaudid isn't used to ease the w/ds from oxy: seems l8ike it could keep you more or less anaesthetized during the really bad days. Methadone and suboxone are major-league drugs, and the horror stories re w/d from these two could be stacked like firewood -- why not a four-day, medically assisted, in-house treatment with it?
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