Long term warfarin use

Common Questions and Answers about Long term warfarin use

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The only risk of long term use of warfarin is bleeding. The drug Plavix may be a little safer than warfarin. It helps keep platelets from sticking together and forming blood clots. You can discuss this alternative with your doctor.
I have heard of people having to be on lovanox long term. For instance, I know of someone who had to be on it throughout pregnancy, because she needed anticoagulation therapy, and warfarin has effects on the fetus. I know those shots aren't fun, but I wonder if you could use them from time to time, to give your hands a break.
My cardiologist has never expressed any concern about long term use of any AFib drugs, I'm on - and I have asked. I take 5 mg Warfarin and 100 mg (or more) of Metoprolol SR every day.
Hi, Long term use of warfarin is known to cause osteoporosis and bone loss. It can also cause osteoporosis related fractures. The most likely reason is due to the reduced intake of vitamin K which is responsible for bone health. The answer is based on information provided. Exact advice is not possible without a proper examination and investigations. You are requested to consult your Doctor. Take care and keep us posted.
Stoke is a biggie for anyone however to me with our blood being too thin can cause some long term effects to our organs not to mention the issues w. the possiblity of bleeding out, bruising, nosebleeds, etc.
Internal mammary artery graft s remain open 97% of the time. The reason for the superior long-term results of internal mammary artery bypass grafts is because the artery is mobilized for grafting along with the small arteries and veins which feed it, the chest wall fat and muscle. There are several disadvantages that limit internal mammary artery grafting. One is the technical problem of mobilizing the artery.
Can you give any more detail about specific side effects of long term warfarin use? I am also interested in any statistics on life expectancies etc of patients my age who may have undergone the same procedure. Many thanks for taking the time to answer these question.
When I ask about the side effects of long term use of the drug, my physician tells me that many people live long lives when taking it regularly, but does not directly answer the question. Can you give any more detail about specific side effects of long term warfarin use? I am also interested in any statistics on life expectancies etc of patients my age who may have undergone the same procedure. Many thanks for taking the time to answer these question.
My wife has been taking Warfarin for the last couple of years for an autoimmune diseases. Could it be a side effect from long term use of the drug?
0 then you are taking twice as long to clot as normal blood, meaning your blood is thinner. 3.0 means three times as long etc etc. The technical term for interest is the prothrombin time (PT). I believe the correct INR for A-Fib is 2.0 - 3.
you will remain on fragmin till the day before c section then you will give birth shortly after when doctors give you all clear you will have another dose - If you are taking warfarin already swapping from warfarin to fragmin makes you feel a little yuck but I find that I feel better generally when taking fragmin rather than warfarin but FRAGMIN is not for long term use.
After close to 15 years of warfarin I was exhibiting much the same symptoms as a stroke patient. Long term use of warfarin will damage and while it can be argued that being damaged is better than being dead, it is not as good as being alive and as undamaged as possible. I informed my cardiologist that I had stopped taking warfarin, wrote down what I was taking instead and a year later asked him if he had looked up nattokinase to see what it was, and he hadn't.
For a 50 year old female, which has the higher risk a bioprosthetic mitral valve that may need to be replaced in 15 years, or a mechanical valve that requires long term coumadin use. I have had colon cancer that requires colonoscopies every 3 years to monitor & I need bunion surgery within the next year. Would the risk for developing a clot while off coumadin for these procedures be higher than the risk of another valve replacement?
, blockage), or hemorrhaging due to capillary wall weakness secondary to either genetic propensity or vascular wall compromise due to long term hypertension? How do we determine this? What testing should be done? 3. Should she be on the statin drug rather than a regular, time-tested BP med (like her original BP meds listed above)? Don’t statins have dangerous side-effects? What should be the proper treatment regimen?
The following is an abstract of an article that very recently appeared in the medical journal, The Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. It addresses the use of long-term use of low molecular weight heparin (Enoxaparin) as a safe and potentially therapeutically superior alternative to Warfarin. 2) Authors Full NameVargas-Hitos, Jose Antonio. Ateka-Barrutia, Oier. Sangle, Shirish. Khamashta, Munther A.
There's a risk of serious or even fatal bleeding — especially when warfarin is taken in high doses or for long periods of time...taking warfarin at a high dose for a longer period of time is only advised for individuals who are at a high risk of developing blood clots that could cause a heart attack, stroke or pulmonary embolism. There is a risk/benefit decision that would require professional judgement.
I am also a long term sufferer of dvt, mine is in the left illiac vein, top of thigh just before the groin area for normal people, I have sores or venous ulcers due to having the clot, normal procedure would be to use a compression dressing to give the sore a chance to heal properly, with ur other medication for other illnesses are they tested with anticoagulation medication, I have had 6different types of anti biotics with no effect on the inr, would it possible to have stents or angioplasty do
) Would catheter ablation of the AV node be too dangerous? Any Long term affects, if not sucessful? 2.) What about cardioversion? 3.) What can be done to prevent further left vent dilation, cardiomyopathy? 4.) Do you feel the new anti-coagulants are superior to warfarin?She is not able to control her INR with warfarin. Thank you for educating me and helping me understand this better.
The main thing is that this tree bark has been declared safe for long term use as an adjunctive with cardiac medications. It seems to be good for lowering chloresterol, treating angina and CHF. If I can find a Standardized Extract made by a company I recognize (getting the same dose each and every time is the only way doing something like this can be theraputic) and if it isn't too pricy I will try it for a year.
I have read quite a bit on cardarone and I am concerned about the side effects and outcome of long term use. What are the outcomes of using this medication? Are the side effects as serious as what I have been reading? Even her Doctor mentioned that a serious side effect is sudden death. Also, will she need another cardioversion? I was not sure that you can have another.
However since stents were invented, they seem to be getting used everywhere now. In kidneys for example, the long term outcome doesn't exactly look promising. In carotid arteries they seem to produce more strokes and heart attacks than the usual procedure. So for the time being, I think I would opt for the endarterectomy if I had to give a choice. I know the minimal invasive option always sounds great.
I quit taking St John Wart when it didn't help with the depression, I am now convinced was caused by long term use of diuretics and not keeping my minerals balanced, and not getting my protime taken and getting my warfarin adjusted put me in the hospital with warfarin poisoning. I am extremly lucky I didn't bleed out. When I was admitted to the ER, SOP is to put in a stent. Blood squirted from my arm and went all over the wall. Then I knew why it felt like an elephant was sitting on my chest.
Nobody should take it lightly. It is dangerous. It is not meant to be used long term. It will shorten long term to mid term. If an alternative can be used, it should be. Doctors will not work with something they cannot control and in the US pharmacutical companies cannot patent natural products. So no major testing gets done because there is no money in it. It all boils down to money. If you use coumadin you are a cash cow. If you don't use coumadin you are not near the cash cow.
I would also really like to know if my fears about long term warfarin use are justified. I would be very grateful for any help you can give me on this subject, as it has become a subject of great concern for me. I posted this on 12/12/98, but it has since disappeared from your list of questions.
I have heard about some people not tolerating warfarin (coumadin). I am on long term coumadin, have been since the PE..almost 5 years now to keep my INR levels between 2 and 3. The one thing that I do have a problem with is keeping my levels in the theraputic range. One week I will be too low, thus having to increase the coumadin and the next it will be too high. As a result, I have to get frequent blood draws. As far as the pain, it does get better over time...
However, since it's an antibiotic, doctors don't want to prescribe it for long-term use. Anyhow, for the nose-bleed crowd--as you point out--there are at-home measures the patient can take. It can also be worth asking the doctor if you've got an overgrown Kiesselbach's Plexus and if so, could it be cauterized. But there is another site, further back in the nose, that causes heavy, dangerous nosebleeds, and for those, packing and pressure such as you had are the treatment.
in my chest and feel I must constantly take deep breaths to sustain my breathing. Despite this I go to the Gym regularly and can use the treadmill at a fairly rapid walking pace for at least a mile, except for some fatigue. I am now considering another medication called Tikosyn which does not have the side effects of amiodarone, but requires another cardioversion with a three day hospital stay to titrate the new medication.
At this time, there are no warfarin substitutes approved by the FDA for use with mechanical valve patients. There are some anecdotal accounts of the newer anticoagulants' having been used off-label for this, with disastrous results. I think it will be a while before we see a good warfarin replacement for mech valve patients. The newer anticoagulants that are out now are being used for other indications, like atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, and post-orthopedic surgery.
I have decided to continue Warfarin.. I am in permanent AFib, so my blood clot risk is high. I didn't see the cost of Pradaxa justified in my case as I get along well with Warfarin. As I told Suzie... on her last post, I have undergone mitral valve repair surgery and my leakage had been reduced to minor (I still have my biological valve, not a substitute).
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