Long term singulair use

Common Questions and Answers about Long term singulair use

singulair

The respiratory risk is both immediate -- poor control of asthma and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> -- the progressive loss of normal lung function. Seriously consider smoking cessation. You may want to look at our Quit Smoking Topic Center at http://www.nationaljewish.org/topic/smoking_cessation.html for ways to help you quit smoking. Also check with your doctor for other quit smoking resources in your area.
Just wondering if there is any know <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> side effects with this new drug? My son just started this medicine for his asthma. The only noticeable side effect is his change in his attitude he has become very aggressive.
A very gentle medication that does work very well for some. I am not sure about <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> usage of cromolyn longer than 2 years. You would need to talk to the doctor about long term usage. There was something I thought on the information sheet about long term usage over many years. But I could be wrong, it was a while ago.
I just started using singulair, I think I will change to another <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> acting medication I have on hand. I wonder if those of you that have problems were using the pill ? Justwondering, and so sorry that so many have issues and now major problems.
My daughter had acute bronchial asthma at the tender age of two and was on daily, regular meds as well as albuterol for rescue meds and steroids for lungs and through the nose for chronic allergic rhinitis. After 5 years of nonsense with these high dosages of meds and no <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> results, we finally found the answer in salt therapy aka "halotherapy" or "speleotherapy" (cave salt therapy).
What antihistamines have you used? It wasn't an antihistamine with a decongestant or Benadryl was it? Singulair can be used for Allergic Rhinitis like you have, however, this is usually prescribed for someone with Asthma issues secondary to Allergic Rhinitis. What nasal steroid are you using? Most of them can be used long term.
I have been enjoying the better relief with a nasal steroid I have been using twice a day, is this safe for <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use? I have tried all of the antihistamines around, none with a decongestant. Benadryl will put me to sleep and make me feel tired the next day, so I try not to use that unless it is a must.
If you need it, you need it, but try your best to consider alternatives. There may not be any. One problem with <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use (over six months, daily) is the development of malignancies. High dose prednisone shuts down the immune system. This does not mean that everyone develops a malignancy. Generally, once started on a regimin the dose should be "tapered off". There are alternatives, such as inhalers that deliver very small doses.
My allergist put me on two weeks of oral steroids and antibiotics, as well as a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> therapy of Pulmicort respules used as a nasal spray. He told me to empty two respules (2 mL each) into an empty nasal spray bottle, and to use the entire amount throughout a single day. I have been doing this for six months with some success, though I rarely finish the whole amount in one day--more like one respule every two days. My sense of smell came back, but now I am worried about safety.
Budecort is an inhaled steroid. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use comes with serious side effects both for adults and for children, but more serious for children. If you are concerned ask your doctor for effective non-steroidal substitutes. I got off inhales steroids three years ago after suffering health problems caused by it. I now use natural anti-inflammatories plus nebulized albuterol and an anti-histamine.
All drugs together for the short term pose no threat, but they are only recently researching the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use of steriod inhalers, so the jury is still out. Best bet ask your respiratory nurse or Doc. Regards S.
I've noticed there are a lot of bad side effects (as there is with any drug I suppose) and I know most of them are from <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use and ten days isn't really <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use, but they still worry me! I'm on a preventer (symbicort), two puffs morning and night. But I still find I'm using my Ventolin at least 5 times a day (bad, I know!!) but I am wondering if there's anything less drastic than Prednisone I could take?
He directed me to take both atrovent and ventolin 2 times a day for a month but I don't really have a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> treatment plan. The doctor seemed a bit stumped as to what else to do. I am suffering from some symptoms almost all the time and regularly have fairly bad attacts. I am very glad to have the ventolin but I'm hoping to find long term treatment for the underlying problem. Has anyone else had similar problems? Any suggestions?
I am taking inhaled symbicort for months but I still have breathing problems
The steroid content is very minimal in both, sprays and inhalers and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use will prevent attacks. When you have an attack, you can use an antihistamine (like Cetzine) for allergic rhinitis. Cetzine is not a steroid and all antihistamines will have some sedatory effects. For wheezing, during the attacks, you can use Asthalin. Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
I very much appreciate your insight and knowledge on the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use of this product. Thank you.
Xopenex® Inhalation Solution (levalbuterol) is a short acting inhaled medicine, a rescue medicine, with fewer side effects than similar medicines used for the relief of acute asthma symptoms. It is not a medicine well-suited for <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span>, sustained asthma control. There are other classes of asthma medicines, called controller medicines and these do not have the same excitatory side effects.
<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> or high dose use of prednisone can cause adrenal damage and atrophy - that's why it's very important to do a taper with it, especially if you've been on it for a while (more than a week or two) Even many short term rounds of prednisone can do damage to your adrenals, especially if not properly tapered. Prednisone wont' help with chronic fatigue - in fact, one side effect of prednisone, especially during a taper or right after a round of it - is fatigue.
I have tried advair, flovent, foradil, albuterol, singulair, and a nebulizer. If I use spiriva in the morning by about 4p.m. I can feel the congestion returning. That's when I take the singulair even tho the doctor wants me to take it at bedtime. The advair did not seem to help. The flovent and foradil combo did not seem to help either. How do I know it's asthma not COPD? Should I react with coughing after using these asthma medications? Any insight?
I still have breathing issues, don't feel well, need to lose the extra weight and feel there MUST be alternatives to the dangerous <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use of steroids to treat allergy related asthma.
Hello, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> side effects of lisinopril are very rare but possible.Moreover,you had an allergic reaction in the form of hives which is generally caused due to viral infections,medications or food allergies.Are you having any other signs and symptoms or are you taking any other medicine along with? It is also found that most cases of hives are idiopathic i.e no cause is known.So whether these hives were due to lisinopril or not can be found out only after consulting an allergist.
These depress the immune system and lead to osteoporosis. Steroids can also cause adrenal fatigue, especially with <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use. I have sworn off all steroids, having suffered the worst of their side effects. I take albuterol and antihistamines and, in the place of steroids, take natural anti-inflammatories which safe, cheap, and more effective than steroids. But, hey, the drug companies can't make any money on them.
Prednisone), which has terrible side effects over the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span>. I can understand your doctor's hesitancy to prescribe this particular drug to you, when there are many better alternatives. Also with any drug there are initial side effects that do disappear over time with use. Just have patience with them, and work with your doctor to find the best drug that works for you.
For this, there are steroidal sprays for allergic rhinitis. The steroid content is very minimal in both, sprays and inhalers and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> use will prevent attacks. When you have an attack, you can use an antihistamine (like Cetzine) for allergic rhinitis. For further relief from your symptoms you could do steam inhalations. Please ensure to do this prior to your meals. Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
Hello and wellcome to MedHelp and the community. The best person to ask these questions is your pharmacist. Your doctor could also answer them for you. budecort duolin is most likely an inhaled corticosteroid. Inhaled corticoseroids have few side effects when used properly. Be sure to rinse your mouth out thoroughly after use as you could develop a thrush (yeast) infection. Mederol is methyprednisolone in the US.
Oh I should also mention that it also takes about 1-2 months for some <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> asthma medication to take full effect so don't take it for 2 weeks and say it isn't working, give it a chance! So I take Singulair for asthma and then claritin (as needed) and a daily steroidal nasal spray for my allergies. I would highly recommend seeing a specialist though.
I recently developed some PVCs (heart palpatations), and I would really like to use a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> asthma controller in place of the symbicort that does not have increased heart rate as a side effect. Are there any somewhat effective asthma medications (long term controller, not rescue inhaler) that do not have increased heart rate as one of the side effects? I would really like to know, because I hate taking that symbicort.
Well, prednisone is a steroid that can have many negative <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> affects if used too frequently (from what I gather from our pediatrician). I am in the same boat. My 2 year olds asthma seems to get worse all the time. He's had pneumonia 4 times and RSV once. He's had multiple rounds of antibiotics also for sinus infections. We've tried Claritan, Zyrtec, Nasonex, and now Singulair. The singular was working.
The pediatrician has prescribed Xopenex and Pulimicort to be inhaled via the nebulizer in the past. After researching the negative <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>long</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>term</span> affects of the pulmicort I have decided not to use it for my daughter. I used to always rush her into the doctors but in the past year I have gained the confidence to try and treat her on my own. What I am wondering is.... Why are her cold symptoms always worse then normal? Should I continue the Xopenex every time she gets a cold?
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