Lidocaine benadryl maalox

Common Questions and Answers about Lidocaine benadryl maalox

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In the mean time you can mix 1/2 and 1/2 liquid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> or other liquid indigestion medication and swish it around your mouth. Tht won't hurt you but y ou need to find out if the ulcer is due to yeast because you will need an anti-fungal to get rid of that.
hi there, go call you physician or dentist and ask for a prescription of benadryl, maalox, and lidocaine. It is commonly known as the "magic mouthwash" and I used to prescribe it all the time for patients going through chemo or had systemic diseases that created chronic apthous ulcers (aka canker sores.) If for some reason you can't get to the dr., use the combination of equal parts liquid benadryl and maalox (or mylanta) gargle and swish for 60 seconds then spit..
<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> elixir of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> viscous lidocaine It's a prescription, but I bet if you ask your Dr to order it he would. You just swish and spit it out. If the sores are in your throat, you can swish and swallow". (I have not needed to use it, but understand it's pretty effective).
You could ask for ‘magic mouthwash’ if you’re developing mouth ulcers; it’s a swish ‘n swallow concoction that typically has <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> and lidocaine; and sometimes nystatin to help with any fungal problems. It numbs on contact; most insurance covers it too, I think. Drs are usually familiar with it, it’s used in cancer chemo too.
It contains lidocaine (which is a topical anesthetic for the pain); <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> (diphenhydraminen, an antihistamine to reduce inflammation), and maalox (an antacid that help to coat the sores and soothe).
It is a ‘swish ‘n swallow Rx concoction that contains various proportions of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> (anti-inflammatory), lidocaine (anesthetic), and sometimes Nystatin (antifungal). It numbs on contact to make eating and drinking a bit easier, although it doesn’t last too long. Typically it’s prescribed to take 5-6 times daily, or as needed.
If you’re just trying to manage this, there’s a prescription product called ‘Magic Mouthwash’ that needs to be formulated by the pharmacist; it contains equal parts of Lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>—and sometimes Nystatin as well. This stuff numbs on contact, and provides near-immediate relief, but doesn’t often deal with the root cause. This **** can be a nuisance; I wish him well.
Hi, did you ever try mixing childrens <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> with the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>? I Have the same problem. Also the Dr gave me a script of swish and spit stuff. When you mentioned the swollen tongue my thoughts were "try wearing retainers on your teeth at night" LOL. Have you ever gotten a diagnosis?
I haven't been able to find any perm solution. The doc told me mix <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> with <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> and put that on but - it didn't really help. Sometimes the get so infected (being in the mouth) I've had to put peroxide on them (OUCH) with a qtip. I do know that people have had to quit treatment because of this because they've gottn it that bad. If you do find a cure---please let me know. Good luck!
It’s a swish ‘n swallow Rx of lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and sometimes nystatin; it numbs on contact, and really helps with thrush and other things.
Have you tried Magic Mouthwash? It’s a combination of lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, with Nystatin sometimes thrown in to help with the fungus. It doesn’t seem to cure what ails you, but sure gives immediate if not temporary relief. It’s an Rx product; and is usually formulated at the pharmacy. I hope you get some relief; this stuff can play hell on the skin.
I have now asked my doctor to prescribe Lidocaine, and I will make my own. Supposedly, you use <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, Childrens liquid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and the Lidocane, but I don't know how much of each. I'll look it up when (if) I need to. Now that I'm going back to work in Sept., I hope and pray so hard that these sores don't come back because it hurts and I look like a monster. Also, if a person is a Herpes Simplex carrier, it can manifest itself while on tx. Even if you don't have outbreaks.
It’s a swish and swallow liquid that needs to be prescribed by a doctor, but works on contact. It contains lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, and Nystatin; it numbs on contact. You can also try eating some yogurt; and there are things like Biotene toothpaste and rinse that seem to help some too.
It’s compounded by the local pharmacy and can contain various proportions of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>, lidocaine and Nystatin. It’s a swish ‘n swallow that is used several times a day and numbs on contact so at least you might be able to eat meals without too much pain. It’s often prescribed to cancer chemo patients; most doctors are at least vaguely familiar with it.
You might ask your doctor for an Rx for ‘magic mouthwash’ if it persists; this is an rx concoction of lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>; sometimes they mix Nystatin in it as well. It numbs on contact, but only lasts a little while. A prescription typically says to ‘swish and swallow’ up to five times daily with it. This stuff is prescribed to cancer chemo patients routinely, so your doctor should be familiar with it. Have them call it in to the pharmacy; it needs to be mixed before hand.
Any way I was pissed (sx) so went to my gp waited forever for him to look at my mouth he said candida infection and gave me the nystatin lozenges and some lidocaine . Made my own mm from the recipe equal parts baby <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, (both cherry. Didn't want to mix mint and cherry, yuk) and the lidocaine.
One common formulation of the mouthwash contains one part each of viscous lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>. To use, swish and spit 5 ml every four hours. Another combination contains 12.5 mg benadryl, 60 ml maalox, 4 grams Carafate, and xylocaine. Swish, gargle and spit 5-10 ml of this formulation every six hours as needed. While xylocaine, lidocaine and Carafate all require a prescription; you can make similar solutions with the other over-the-counter components.
The most commonly used Magic Mouthwash contains equal parts of lidocaine viscous, diphenhydramine elixir, and aluminum-magnesium hydroxide (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>®). The antacid was included as a protectant. This “lidobenalox” or BMX (benadryl-maalox- Xylocaine) mouthrinse is “swished and swallowed” or “swished and spit.” Unfortunately, there is no standard for Magic Mouthwash. Some versions contain nystatin to treat fungal infections or hydrocortisone or dexamethasone as anti-infl ammatories.
What worked for me..Hmmm...Aveeno bath and body oil...Warm, not hot baths and pat dry afterwards...Chlorophineramine at night (benedryl made feel hung over)...for night-time dry mouth -mouth moisturizing gel -very nice and lasts nearly all night...Prevents leather tongue...LOADS of water...for the REALLY bad itchy and dry spots, bag balm or lanolin ointment (best kind is the stuff newly nursing mothers use for chapped nipples).It restores moisture and oils to the skin which stops the itch...
Magic Mouthwash is an Rx swish and swallow containing lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> (and sometimes Nystatin) that numbs on contact. It’s frequently prescribed for cancer Tx; you’re doctor should be aware of it. The stuff numbs on contact, and although it doesn’t last very long, it’s nice to get a respite. The directions will let you use it 5 or 6 times daily.
Yes we call them lie bumps lol.....before treatment id get maybe one once a year now i stay with them...they stated on me about 13 weeks into treatment. Before my mother passed away she had them so bad from chemo she couldnt eat or drink....it hurt her so bad. I looked them up and saw this >>>Transient lingual papillitis, commonly known as "lye bumps" or "lie bumps," can be a painful nuisance, but fortunately the bumps are not generally a sign of serious illness.
My doctor prescribed an antibiotic (Ceftin - I'm allergic to quite a number of antibiotics so have to be careful what I take) and also a gargle/mouthwash called Magic Mouthwash that has lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> in it that I can gargle with four times a day to help numb my throat and ease the pain. I've used it twice so far and have not had ANY improvement of the throat pain, even right after using the gargle.
I used Magic Mouthwash (children's liquid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> and something like lidocaine). I also rinsed with a product called Prevention. I got it at Walgreen's and it is made for patients undergoing chemo. You risnse at least 4 times a day and it helped the most.
a prescription medication which is a mixture of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span>, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, Nystatin, and lidocaine. You swish it around your mouth without swallowing it. It numbs the mouth for about a half hour. Taste nasty but seems to work real well for my mouth sores. Here's my question, this has an anti-fungal in it and there was recently discussion here about avoiding anti-fungals... do you think this could be a problem?
I continued reading articles and forums seeking to convince myself that I was negative. I went to see another doc who put me on Buspar and a rinse of lidocaine, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>benadryl</span> and maalox. It made my mouth feel better. Didn't help emotions. The Buspar made me feel tired all the time (another symptom).
Magic mouthwash prescription (Heavenly!) (It's made from <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span>, viscous lidocaine, and antithrush medicine) for Riba rages....Antidepressants and a padded room with a sign on the outside (Enter at your own risk"! for chills/ aches...Tylenol and an electric blanket...Or just a heavy blanket thrown in the dryer for a few minutes.. for fatigue while raising kiddos...the "Fly Lady" home management book (Flylady.
Magic Mouthwash Prescription Rx Recipes and formulas There is no standard formula for Magic Mouthwash. It's like trying to find the "best" meatloaf recipe; you will find many! When the pharmacy gets a prescription for Magic Mouthwash, the pharmacist makes each one ("compounds") according to the prescribing physician's instructions or recipe.
Well, on the morning of the 15th day I woke up at around 4am with horrible gas and could feel the acid burning in my chest like a fire. I took my usual swig of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>maalox</span> and 2 simethicone tabs which I keep by my bed because I have had this happen before, however on this particular morning it was 20x's worse. I ending up calling 911 because my heart was racing like never before. In the ambulance my heartrate was 198.
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