Laryngitis symptoms larynx

Common Questions and Answers about Laryngitis symptoms larynx

laryngitis

Hi, transient loss of voice and hoarse voice are the typical symptoms of laryngitis. It is inflammation of the larynx (voice box). It is mainly caused by virus and treatment depends on type of virus affected. Even serological tests will help to identify the responsible pathogens. It can be treated with appropriate anti viral.
Cough and sore throat are usually symptoms of laryngitis Cough may even be a causative factor for laryngitis.Other symptoms are difficulty swallowing,sensation of swelling in the area of the larynx,cold or flu-like symptoms,fever and swollen lymph nodes. I hope it helps.Take care and pls do keep me posted.
1) that the infection causing your sinusitis is not responsive to the prescribed antibiotic or, 2) that infection has spread directly to your epiglottis or vocal cords, this latter being a serious complication. If, when you receive this response, your symptoms have not resolved, you and your doctor should request consultation with an ENT specialist, to perform direct (fiberoptic) examination of your larynx, including the vocal cords, and re-assessment of your sinuses.
I tend to get a minor cold three or four times a year. About three or four days later I will develop bronchitis, followed by a laryngitis and perhaps a minor sore throat. I will have coughing spasms in which I gag and cough for several minutes, at times spitting up yellow mucus. Incontinence is common during these coughing spells. I have no trouble breathing; I am a non-smoker. But the major symptom is extreme fatigue.
Has anyone heard of stomach acid accumulation caused by this condition and its effect on the larynx, affecting voice ? I frequently feel mucous at bottom of larynx, having to clear my throat and horseness some coughing. I do get dry mouth while sleeping at night. When I talk extensively or at loud pitch, my voice gets raspy.
Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
Started a few years ago as a little esophageal inflammation. Two years ago I started to get laryngitis alot.
(Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
) LPR= Laryngeal-Pharyngeal Reflux. (Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
More plausible causes of hoarseness of voice need to be checked like acute laryngitis, vocal cord nodules, allergies, gastro esophageal reflux, smoking, thyroid problems, trauma to larynx, parkinson’s disease and trauma to larynx. Consult an otolaryngologist who will evaluate the causes and treat likewise. Cough suppressants for laryngitis, treat GERD, stop smoking, vocal rest etc will make a difference. Hope this information helps you. Take care.
I appear to have developed adult onset asthma, possibly due to aspiration of gastric asthma (?) I'm still having tests. The asthma-like problem is exacerbated by an ache in my neck/larynx. I was convinced this might be due to inflammation from laryngeal reflux, but a recent laryngoscopy and endoscopy showed my voice box to be absolutely fine (although I did have a mild hiatal hernia !). I presently take a PPI daily. Q.
(Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
There is increasing evidence that GERD causes laryngeal signs and symptoms. Symptoms of reflux laryngitis include hoarseness, throat clearing, dysphagia, increased phlegm, and globus (feeling of lump in one’s throat) sensation. Despite suspected epidemiologic reports, there is still controversy about the prevalence of GERD-related laryngeal signs and symptoms. Studies have shown that 24-hour pH monitoring may not be the perfect test for diagnosing atypical GERD.
(Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
If acid reflux gets past the upper esophageal sphincter, it can enter the throat (pharynx) and even the voice box (larynx), causing hoarseness or a sore throat. Laryngitis Nausea Sore throat Chronic dry cough, especially at night. GERD is a common cause of unexplained coughing. It is not clear how cough is caused or aggravated by GERD. Asthma.
Increased, infected mucous can act as an irritant to your larynx and cause laryngitis. There are many reasons for recurrent infection including, but not limited to, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, a foreign body, cystic fibrosis, a tumor partially blocking your airways, recurrent exposure to an irritant, etc. You are right to be concerned because any infection could suddenly get much worse. You should ask your doctor if you need to see a pulmonary specialist.
like my words get stuck every time and feel i have damaged my vocal cords or larynx muscles ...as they don't close or open properly? now i have completely stopped exercise or singing . Can i regain real voice , 100% alright , by resting or do i need some treatment? i want to use rest option ? ill i be able to speak without pausing?? will i with any home treatment , be able to speak without pausing. please help me ...
(Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
) LPR= Laryngeal-Pharyngeal Reflux. (Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
This means that someone with this condition has a 50% chance of passing it on to each child s/he has. People with this condition can have swelling of the tongue, skin, larynx, uvula and abdominal pain attacks. There are three different forms of this condition and genetic testing is available on a clinical basis to help with making a diagnosis. Treatment for acute attacks and preventive treatment is available.
the oral symptoms you describe do not sound like herpes, warts, or any other STD; and the other symptoms (sore throat, laryngitis, cough, etc) undoubtedly were due to a garden-variety respiratory virus. With all that evidence, you can be confident you don't have an STD. Genital HPV infections rarely cause overt warts in the mouth, and the description doesn't sound like warts.
) LPR= Laryngeal-Pharyngeal Reflux. (Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
Ok, I have been sick for about 6 weeks now - off and on with flu like symptoms, going to bronchitis a couple of times (I have had chronic bronchitis for about 5 years). I have been through 3 rounds of antibiotics, have tripled my dosage of Advair to 500mg twice daily from 250 mg once - I am taking Combivent inhalers every 4 hours, I have recently been given a massive cough medicine to make me stop coughing (isn't working) - which is the second kind of cough medicine, Singulair...
The third possibility is that it could be some type of inflammatory process in your lungs with secondary involvement of your larynx. You should get a second GI opinion and if GERD is truly ruled-out, you should see a pulmonologist for a bronchoscopy. A bronchoscopy is a procedure where a tube called a bronchoscope is passed through your nose into you windpipe to look into your lungs. With the bronchoscope tiny pieces of lung tissue can be taken for further testing.
I have diagnosed with GERD with hiatal hernia and also vocal cord dysfunction. The doctors at first thought I had asthma. VCD mimic asthma like symptoms. Can you give me any info about the connection between my VCD and GERD. I know at times that my GERD can trigger attacks and I have to rely on my proventil inhaler. The only site I can find on VCD is the National Jewish Center in Denver, CO. I was diagnosed there with it. Thank you for any info and suggestions.
I just lost my mother to cancer last month. She had laryngitis-type symtoms (scratchy voice etc.) for weeks and my sister and I urged her to see a doctor. She was referred to an ears/nose/throat specialist. The word 'specialist' still makes me cringe. This doctor listened to her scratchy voice as she listed her symptoms, stuck a flashlight in her mouth to look at the back of her throat, and said, "I've seen this before. You have acid reflux syndrome. I'll give you a prescription.
In answer to your three posts above: 1. Mesothelioma is extremely rare and a one time exposure is very unlikely to result in a mesothelioma. But, you must remember that there is not a "safe" level of asbestos exposure. 2. Your symptoms of productive cough and laryngitis (hoarse voice) might be (and might not be) related to the dust exposure that occurred several months ago.
NERVOUS SYSTEM 1. Headaches; Migraines 2. Vertigo 3. Fainting (sometimes with epileptic spasms) 4. Insomnia, drowsiness and other sleep difficulties 5. Tinnitus 6. Memory loss 7. Rapid fatigue 8. Irritability 9. Short temper 10. Poor concentration 11. Unsubstantiated fear 12. Apathy 13. Hearing loss 14. Paresthesia (including total loss of all forms of sensitivity, more frequent than extremities) 15. Spasm during sleeping, tremor and tick 16. Vision loss 17. Age related far-sightedness 18.
FYI Norovirus causes gastrointestinal symptoms. It isn't influenza. Flu always causes respiratory symptoms. Rhinovirus causes colds. It isn't influenza either. Antibiotics fight infections (caused by bacteria). They do nothing against viruses. They are sometimes ordered to prevent superimposed bacterial infections if that is important for a specific reason.
(Larynx=voice box, containing the 2 vocal cords. Pharynx=throat, above the larynx. The larynx is above the trachea/windpipe.
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