Lantus pen needles

Common Questions and Answers about Lantus pen needles

lantus

My daughter recently switched to lantus, and has been experiencing a complete lack of energy -- almost lethargy. Her personality has changed as well, and her sugars are running much higher than before. Not sure what the problem is.
1. Every Medicare Part D plan contracts independently with pharmacies for a contracted price on all medications. Most Medicare D plans will allow you to go onto their website and select the pharmacy you want to get your prescription from and will give you a price on the medication for that specific pharmacy. When you are in the gap you are responsible for the plan’s contracted price of the medication, not the cash price. 2.
Just a word of advise, we have figured this out through trial and error, we have come across two types of needles for the pen. One is just the needle (it screws on to the top of the pen) the other is a needle (it also screws on to the top of the pen) but it has a plastic cylinder around the needle which you need to press firmly against the skin in order for it to retract the plastic then exposed the needle. My son found this needle very uncomfortable.
I am on <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lantus</span> and Novalog. I am using the pen needles. My problem is that the last two lantus pens I have tried using were working fine , until I got down to about 200 to 240 units left in the 250 unit pens and then I could no longer depress the button. What is going on. and how do I rectify this problem. My insurance company will not allow me to get more insulin by the time I run out of my present amount.
She uses the smallest needles available for the pen. Her diet is very limited and on a daily basis she usually eats about 2 bowls of cucumbers with vinegar and a bit of olive oil and some type of protein, such as chicken or salmon. Her sugar is never consistant. Sometimes her sugar level reads 430, 525, 290 and so on through out the day and sometimes hits way low around 50. It is troubling to see my Mother struggle with this.
I have tried other medications such as Actos and Januvia but they did not make that big a difference. I tried the Byetta as well with the same results. So I am not afraid of needles or injections. My question would be which insulin pens would be my best choice? I think a long acting such as lantus and I might need a rapid acting one for meals? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. I am going to see the nurse practioner today in my doctor's office.
I have been using insulin pens for years. And they are so much more convenient. I have just switched fom NPH to <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lantus</span>. And the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lantus</span> pen has been withdrawn from the market. But the cartridges fit perfectly in a Humalog pen.
Went every month and picked up inslulin (Novalog and lantus), strips (whatever doc. wrote which was 300 strips a month), needles, insulin pens, pen needles, etc.. Never any problem. My husband lost his job and now we did not have insurance. We qualified for Medicaid then. I do thank goodness that we did have something until my insurance kicked in at my job but that Medicaid was a headache. It did not pay for hardly anything, we had problems getting every prescription filled each month.
Hi, i see it's been a while since you posted your question on Victoza and weight loss. The first 7 days of taking this medicine and watching my calorie and nutrient intake, i've lost 7 lbs. in 7 days. i was no happy about taking this, since i have hypo-thyroid & there were 3 months my regular thyroid medication was off the market.
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