Lansoprazole and vitamin b12

Common Questions and Answers about Lansoprazole and vitamin b12

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Hi there, Lansoprazole interferes with the absorption of vitamin B12 from food .There could be a fall in vitamin B12 status due to decreased stomach acid. It is important to confirm that you are suffering from vitamin B12 defficiency.After conducting a thorough history and physical examination a complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and serum cobalamin may be done as part of initial laboratory assessment.
) In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex. Anti-ulcer Medications The body's ability to absorb vitamin B12 is decreased when taking stomach acid-reducing medications such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine, or antacids that are often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers or related symptoms.
Your problems can be a combination of bad gastric reflux and vitamin B 12 or electrolyte deficiency. Hence, it is important to get serum electrolytes and vitamin B12 levels checked. The gastric reflux can cause chemical burn of the tongue caused by acid from the stomach. The symptoms could be exacerbation of the GERD or gastric reflux. It could also be hiatal hernia. Treatment is a combination of drugs to reduce the acid and lifestyle changes.
Shortness of breath upon exertion. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemia Symptoms Low levels of vitamin B12 cause damage to the brain and nerve cells. The symptoms this causes may be the first ones you notice. They can include: Numbness or tingling in the fingers and toes. Poor balance and coordination. Forgetfulness. Depression. Confusion. Difficulty thinking and concentrating. Impaired judgment and poor control of impulses. A decreased ability to sense vibration.
Best treatment option is Triple therapy while prescription require little modifications like change in Antibiotics depending on drug sensitivity,Change in PPI-omeprazole to Rabeprazole or Esmoprazole or Lansoprazole), H2 antagonists-Cimetidine or Famotidine or Ranitidine,Adjustment in combinations of antacids with colic medications and Vitamin B12,dietary modifications,observation of symptoms and regular follow up,which may vary depending on observation with the Attending Physician.
Okay -- all that said, since you are a vegetarian, it's quite likely that you are low in vitamin b12 as well because some of the best sources for b12 are meat, poultry, eggs and some dairy. I'm not a vegetarian, but I also have vitamin b12 deficiency - pernicious anemia - and have to take shots for it every 2 weeks. B12 deficiency will cause fatigue, tingling and/or numbness in the hands, feet, legs.
I designed this group to support chronic pain sufferers from vitamin D deficiency and really had no place to go. Get our story out and tell us yours.
B12 and Iron Deficiency Medical studies suggest that some of the medicines used in the treatment of GERD can result in vitamin B12 and iron deficiency. According to the NIH's Office of Dietary Supplements, proton-pump inhibitors, like omeprazole and lansoprazole, can inhibit B12 absorption, since stomach acid is necessary for the absorption of this nutrient. They recommend monitoring of B12 levels in people taking proton-pump inhibitors for prolonged periods of time.
I think everything is over and I clean up. I walk out of the toilet and in about 2 minutes time the stomach cramp and the fainting sensation comes back (I've fainted only once to date from this and was out for about 15-20 minutes). 6. When I get back to the toilet I have a really violent Diarrhoea episode in pure liquid state.
8) diclofenac 50mg three times aday lansoprazole 30mg daily co-amilofruse 40/5mg daily B12 injection every 3 months I take my thyroxine every day without fail...why is my TSH high....why has it never been normal....feel so depressed about the weight gain, I eat healthy but my joints now are so painful it's becoming hard to walk/exercise....now weigh 20 stone What's wrong with me ???? Please help ?????
Other tests which may help are round the clock sugar monitoring, holter to rule out arrhythmia and situational hypotension/hypertension, blood tests for electrolytes, vitamin B12, vitamin D and hyperparathyroidism. Also, the sleep disturbances need to be treated as they can cause dysautonomia like symptoms. If you have thyroid issues then yes, you must consult an Endo as well. However, you need to see an neurologist to rule out other causes. Please discuss with your doctor. Take care!
The anemia and weakness can cause the heart to beat faster. So, along with stool test you need to test for anemia, low vitamin B12, and electrolyte imbalance. Other than this, you do appear to suffer from acidity and gastric reflux. You also need to find out if you have H pylori infection. Many a times a persisting H pylori infection can be the cause behind acidity not responding to treatment.
At the time of the latest incident, I was on amoxicillin but no other meds continuously, although I have been taking lansoprazole at night only, for a week and a half to two weeks.
All these can cause problems in absorption of vitamin B12, iron, minerals etc. This can in turn cause neurological signs and symptoms and palpitation (especially if you have anemia, low calcium or low magnesium). So, yes, you should consult a gastroenterologist. Also you must discuss the possibility of an autoimmune neuropathy with your neurologist. A comprehensive investigation is required keeping all the above mentioned points in mind. Hope you get well soon! Good Luck and take care!
I also suggest that you get tested for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin. Hypo patients are frequently too low in the ranges for those and suffer with associated symptoms, some of which can mimic hypothyroid symptoms. Also note the following info I picked up from goolarra. "Thyroid treatment isn't optimal -- and may not work -- if you do not have adequate Vitamin D for the crucial final metabolic step, which takes place at the site where thyroid hormone actually works.
calcium, B9 and B12, magnesium, zinc, iron, vitamin C and beta carotene. Magnesium deficiency is found to be the cause of 50 - 60% of migranes. This one deficiency lists far to many symptoms to count but includes fatigue, heart palpitations, migranes, anxiety, shortness of breath (feels like you can't get enough air in your lungs), lump in throat or difficulty swallowing, muscle weakness.... The baking soda (sodium bicarbonate, not baking powder) test...
Chamomile, Parsley Spices and herbs Spices and herbs, which may trigger allergic reactions by pollen allergy Anis, Curry, Merian, Basil, Coriander, Oregano, Dill, Caraway, Paprika, Tarragon and Black pepper, Spices and herbs may trigger symptoms, if you are allergic to celery and is allergic to sagebrush pollen or birch pollen. Reactions to the spices and herbs are rare.
Celiac can cause many vitamin and mineral and nutrient deficiencies leading to many of your problems. Was your thyroid checked? How about hormone issues - are your periods regular with no problems? Did they ever test your stomach acid - maybe you're not making enough - crucial to a well functioning GI tract and to absorption of your nutrients that help keep body systems functioning well. How about family history - anyone even come close to some of the symptoms that you have?
Flexeral, Diclofenac, Biaxin 500mg, Plaquinal, and Vitamin d and B12. I was on tramadol and soma but GP was scared of dependency issues. When I went to one neurologist he thought it might be some sort of stress induced Basil Migraine. Did a EMG and it had a slight distruptency but the thought it may be due to the meds. Another Neurologist was convinced it was MS, MRI ruled it out. #1 Rheumy thought it was fibromyalgia but no tender points. Tried Lyrica, did nothing.
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
3 months ago sudden onset of paresthesias starting in left fingers/hand spreading several days later to right fingers/hand then right toes/leg and left toes/leg then abd/trunk and finally lips/tongue and scalp. I have had tingling, buzzing, "hot shocks", feelings of hot water pouring down my thigh, twitching randomly all over, and tremors in my right arm. Serum labs negative except for elevated neutrophils at 84. WBC normal. B-12 low normal at 301.
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
I have recently read articles on the connection of Lhermitte's sign and vitamin B12 deficiency. I haven't eaten meat in about 4 years. Since I am only 23 is it more likely that I have MS than a B12 deficiency? I am also feeling a numbing sensation in my toes. I had two MRIs done two years ago on my brain and lower back. They both came out negative. Is there anything else I can do to find out what is causing this feeling? Follow Ups: Lhermitte's Sign - an episode or symptom?
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
Posted By CCF MD mdf on May 07, 1999 at 22:30:52 Vitamin B12 deficiency is not anything to fool around with. The neurologic consequences usually include impairment of peripheral nerve function (and actual permanent damage) as well as a syndrome called "subacute combined degeneration" in which damage to the spinal cord occurs. It is a metabolic problem - B12 and folate are necessary cofactors in certain biochemical reactions and neural tissue needs this in order to work properly.
It can arise in any disorder affecting cervical spinal cord, such as disc compression or even vitamin B12 deficiency. Since you have not been having the symptom and you have experienced a recurrence, I recommend a visit to your neurologist as soon as you can get in. If the prior diagnosis was "possible MS" then I don't know what data was missing but this time you may be able to get enough information to clarify the diagnosis.
I have recently read articles on the connection of Lhermitte's sign and vitamin B12 deficiency. I haven't eaten meat in about 4 years. Since I am only 23 is it more likely that I have MS than a B12 deficiency? I am also feeling a numbing sensation in my toes. I had two MRIs done two years ago on my brain and lower back. They both came out negative. Is there anything else I can do to find out what is causing this feeling?
I have recently read articles on the connection of Lhermitte's sign and vitamin B12 deficiency. I haven't eaten meat in about 4 years. Since I am only 23 is it more likely that I have MS than a B12 deficiency? I am also feeling a numbing sensation in my toes. I had two MRIs done two years ago on my brain and lower back. They both came out negative. Is there anything else I can do to find out what is causing this feeling?
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