Hypoglycemia or alcohol withdrawal

Common Questions and Answers about Hypoglycemia or alcohol withdrawal

hypoglycemia

I ignored this dizzy like feeling at first because I wrote it off as the effects of alcohol withdrawal, but I've intentionally stopped drinking as of a couple days ago and am still having some severe bouts of this dizzy/drunk thing. I know it hasn't been long since I stopped, but I am really having to limit how much I drive because the feeling tends to happen most severely at that time. I'm afraid that I will get into an accident even just driving 5 minutes across town. Any suggestions?
So the neurologist believes my symptoms are the result of alcoholism although all tests have proved normal thus far. My GP believes alcohol may be a factor but whether it is the cause or only exacerbates the problem he does not know. I do not intend to drink in the near future. Has anyone out there seen anything similar or had similar experiences? While it doesn't seem to be getting worse I cannot carry on like this forever.
severe acute alcohol ingustion can cause Hypoglycemia (low blood suger). the reason he is NPO (nothing by mouth) is becouse when you eat or drink it will draw more blood to the stomach which inturn will make it blled more so they have to get that under control first. IV drugs can be administered but they don't want to cover up any of the signs/symptoms of the gi bleed just in case it gets worse.
It's not just about the money either its about all the times you missed a school event or didnt take them to do this or that so you could drink. Dont think back and say they had a good childhood, think back and think about all the things you could've done to make it better. Drink and die my friend there no way out of it. Believe me I have searched and searched for any other options but it just is what it is! I really wish you the best and I hope you find the strength that you need.
For around three or four years now, I have been suffering from headaches some two hours or more after the consumption of any amount of alcohol - although typically as few as two drinks upwards of any kind of alcohol. The headaches come on slowly but persistently and follow a line from the left side of my neck across the top of my head to just above the left eyebrow. They are not sharp pains but more of a constant 'throb' and can go on for hours.
but NEVER at the expense of risking a dependence to alcohol, or other substances. If that is a risk, then there are other, much safer options.
A psychologist has told me that I have a serious problem with alcohol after I told her that I often cant stop drinking once I’ve started and that in my whole life I have never drunk alcohol without getting drunk or without the intention of getting drunk. A psychiatrist has similarly told me it’s a problem for me, especially because I have bipolar and that I should stop but I don’t. When I drink I will on average drink more than 10 standard drinks in one sitting.
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause.
I have looked up various diets for dyspepsia and have found disappointing conflicting advice, so I have started trying things out (cutting back a lot). No alcohol, coffee, tea, pop, juice, spices or strong flavourings (all condiments), tomato products, citrus, vinegar, chocolate, red meat. Low fat (low or non fat dairy, no fired foods), and I am trying to cut back on raw veggies and cooked dried beans, but I need to eat something!
Hi everyone I've been suffering with their air hunger very bad for about 10 years it started in 1995 that had it ever since I've been to many doctors emergency rooms psychiatrists and nobody ever use the word air hunger they said it was emphysema asthma which they were all wrong I quit alcohol about 28 years ago never had a drink since I'll never forget when I quit started to get panic attacks that were outrageous and back then not too many people or doctors knew what they were I suffered like h
Shakes can be caused by many things, but can be symptomatic of low blood sugar, especially if it happens when he is due or overdue to eat. This could indicate diabetes or hypoglycemia. I would see his doctor for bloodwork. If he is a heavy drinker this could also be symptomatic of alcohol withdrawal.
Hi Uncontrollable shaking or trembling at night may be due to several causes like excessive cold, stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia, low blood sugar(hypoglycemia), tiredness, seizures and side effects of medications. It is also seen in cases of alcohol withdrawal seen in chronic alcoholism. The other symptoms include hallucinations, severe anxiety, sweating, and sudden feelings of terror. This syndrome is known as delirium tremens.
You may be suffering from physiological tremors which can aggravate with emotion, exhaustion, hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism, alcohol withdrawal etc. it is generally not caused by a neurological disease. There are many types of neurological tremors due to cerebellar or parkinsonism etc.Tremors can also be an accompaniment of migraine itself. It is good that you are seeing your neurologist. You can ask him and get your concerns sorted out since he will examine you personally. Take care.
Other causes include the use of drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, SSRI), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, Phenylketonuria. overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Tremor can also be caused from lack of sleep or vitamins, or Stress (biological)stress.
Apart from panic attacks, head rushes could also be due to anemia, hypoglycemia or as a withdrawal symptom of going off lexapro. It can also be due to overexertion, poor sleep pattern, drinking too much coffee or alcohol or due to thyroid disorders. Do discuss these possibilities with your doctor and get investigated accordingly. Hope this helps. Please let me know if there is any thing else and do keep me posted. Take care!
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause.
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause.
It is rarely visible to the eye and may be heightened by strong emotion (such as anxiety or fear), physical exhaustion, hypoglycemia, hyperthyroidism, heavy metal poisoning, stimulants, alcohol withdrawal or fever. It can be seen in all voluntary muscle groups and can be detected by extending the arms and placing a piece of paper on top of the hands. Enhanced physiologic tremor is a strengthening of physiologic tremor to more visible levels.
You can always gradually lower your Paxil dose [very, very slowly]. I would not skip a day or you will have Paxil withdrawal. Wellbutrin may not work well for you, but combined with Paxil at the right doses it may help.
In your mother’s case it could be a case of alcohol intoxication dimming brain response, or a chronic vegetative state, coma, hypothermia or hypoglycemia (common after alcohol withdrawal). This is a tough situation, one that cannot be assessed on net. Please discuss these possibilities with your mother’s treating doctors. Take care!
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause. Have you got any imaging study done? If yes, what does it say?
It has been shown that individuals with substance addictions may very likely be suffering from an assortment of one or more metabolic disorders such as hypoglycemia, hypoadrenia, hypothyroidism, Vitamin B deficiency, mineral deficiencies, liver malfunction, and depression. Serious maladaptive patterns, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, hypoglycemia, and candida albicans, have always been common among drug addicts and alcoholics.
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause.
Other causes include the use of some drugs (such as amphetamines, caffeine, corticosteroids, and drugs used for certain psychiatric disorders), alcohol abuse or withdrawal, mercury poisoning, overactive thyroid or liver failure. Tremors can be an indication of hypoglycemia, along with palpitations, sweating and anxiety. Some forms of tremor are inherited and run in families, while others have no known cause.
apnea shock cancer anemia frostbite arrhythmia anaphylaxis thalassemia hypothermia iron overload hypoglycemia lead poisoning chronic infection aortic dissection motion sickness G6PD deficiency arterial embolism alcohol poisoning pulmonary edema sickle cell anemia alcohol withdrawal pheochromocytoma hemolytic uremic syndrome malnutrition ~ vitamin B12 deficiency morning sickness caused by pregnancy drug side effect ~ coumadin, amphetamine"
Some types of hypoglycemia are caused by a tumor or other physical damage to a gland. However, that is rare, and not the focus of this article. The more common type of hypoglycemia - called "functional," "reactive," or "fasting" - is your body's reaction to what you put in it. Hypoglycemia is the body's inability to properly regulate blood sugar levels, causing the level of sugar in the blood to be too low or to fall too rapidly.
But actually they may have frucose malabsorption - FM (or lactose intolerance or celiac disease) in which some fruits, vegetables, sugars and other products rich in fructose or sorbitol can't be tolerated. The problem is impaired absorption of fructose and sorbitol in small intestine. Treatment is with low fructose diet. http://www.healthhype.com/nutrition-guide-for-fructose-malabsorption.
You are lucky they have not turned to seizures yet. Seizures are not only from alcohol withdrawal but also from alcohol poisoning, from too much in your system or your system not accepting it well anymore. Your best bet is to quit now and start attending A.A. meetings to get some help. If you stop drinking abrubptly you may experience withdrawal and not understand what is happening to you.
It is rarely visible to the eye, as in your case, and may be exasperated by anxiety, stress or other strong emotion, physical over-exertion, hypoglycemia or diabetes, hyperthyroidism, heavy metal toxicity, drug or alcohol withdrawal, excessive caffeine, Candida Albicans, stimulants, EMF pollution or fever from an infection. The cause could be: - from physical injury to skeletal (muscle) nerves, -underlying infectious conditions normally not detectable by standard blood tests (look up Dr.
Tremor can result from other conditions as well. Alcoholism, excessive alcohol consumption, or alcohol withdrawal can kill certain nerve cells, resulting in tremor, especially in the hand. (Conversely, small amounts of alcohol may help to decrease familial and essential tremor, but the mechanism behind this is unknown. Doctors may use small amounts of alcohol to aid in the diagnosis of certain forms of tremor but not as a regular treatment for the condition.
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