How long is lantus good for

Common Questions and Answers about How long is lantus good for

lantus

My daughter is 17 and is having trouble with adjusting insulin doses...how much lantus would be a good dose to start with?
Your doctor can advise you as to how the Lantus is affecting you, and how to adjust your food, and time you take the insulin. You might also want to ask about the insulin pump, Which does the same as the Lantus. It gives you a base line of insulin and you just dose your self when you eat according to the amount of carbohydrates you eat.
I would be interested to know what the industrial manufacturing process is for Lantus or other long acting Insulins. I have known of cases that are never reported where drugs are so-called 100% safe even though it is a known fact that the a certain amount manufacturing personnel become sick from handling the sealed vials of the drug...I always wondered if the people who used those drugs would have any idea what happened to them.
It is dangerous for your sugars to be this high for long. Are you taking metformin as well? This can help the insulin resistance. Another thing, is you need to be checked for any infection. Infection can raise your blood sugars and make it impossible to get them down. In particular see a dentist and also get your doctor to check if there is anything else going on that needs to be treated.
Lantus behavior (physicians information) is described here: http://products.sanofi-aventis.us/lantus/lantus.html#Clinical%20Pharmacology My experience with Lantus led to serious hypoglycemia, but that was due to accidental IV injection of a portion of the dose, which is a documented problem. Quote from above web page: "PRECAUTIONS General: LANTUS is not intended for intravenous administration.
And as for the sweats about a half hour after taking Lantus, there IS a slight peak action with Lantus, although this peak action for most people is several hours after taking the Lantus. In my case, I usually take my Lantus at about 6 am, and I notice a peak that causes my glucose levels to drop by about 8 am. This happens even if I have not taken any Novolog or eaten breakfast (sometimes I wait until I get to work to take Novolog and eat breakfast), so it has to be the Lantus peaking.
If you believe your are reacting badly to Lantus (or any other medications) you should ask your physician for an alternative, at least to verify it is the medication and not some other factor that is causing the problem. Lantus is popular for it's 24 hour action, but so is Levemir (Novo Nordisk). NPH insulin can also be used for long acting insulin, though two injections may be needed to get the 24 hour coverage.
Does anyone know a formula for amount of Lantus needed for a basal dose vs how many units fast-acting you take per carb? I have major swings. Yesterday was told by a nurse that the Lantus I take is really low compared to amount of Humalog I take, but she never told me HOW much she thought I should be taking. I take 1.5 u Humalog per carb for all meals (for last 3 weeks - has changed many times). I'm supposed to take 11 u Lantus in am. My morning BS is usually 300-500.
1) Your dosage for the Lantus is correct, and this will vary for each person. If you are eating the same numbers of carbs, but having swings in glucose, the main baseline dose may still not be correct for you. Keep records of your foods and insulin and talk with your endo to get this straightened out. 2) The base dose for the quick-acting is somewhat different for individuals, too.
well, avantis (lantus) was not much help or all that interested they took the lot# of the lantus at my suggestion, it was not their belief that burning was related to an allergic reaction i am on my 3rd bottle of lantus w/same burning sensation, so it's not just the bottle, turns out there are no studies of lantus' long term effects in humans, which i found interesting, i have been reluctant to switch, but that seems to be where i am heading with this, i really wanted to stay with lantus, guess
I'm sure he was must've been given recommended doses. Is he seeing an endocrinologist? There are step by step instructions on how to determine your blood sugar to insulin and blood sugar to carbohydrate ratio (as well as basal settings) on the insulin pumpers website: http://www.insulin-pumpers.org/howto/ratio.
I have been T1 for 28 years, so I am totally dependent on injected insulin. I have been on Lantus for about a year now. Variability in absorption/action is minimal and I am very happy with the results.
Hi again Tumtum, I'm not a Lantus user, but I've read a fair amount (from other users) so I hope I can be of some help. Since Lantus is commonly used today, I hope others will chime in with their tips 'n' tricks, too. The process of finetuning can be so frustrating. As I'm sure you know a cold or flu can wreack havoc on our control in very unpredictable ways. Even with a well-honed routine during healthy times, our control often cannot be tight during those times.
However, as a type 1 diabetic who is also very lean, I have some suggestions for you from 34 years of personal experience with diabetes and insulin injections. First, I would encourage you to use arms and legs for the actual shots in addition to your stomach in spite of your lean body build. The arms do not bruise as badly for me as legs, for the large blood vessels run on the INSIDE of the arm rather than on the top of the leg to possibly get knicked by your needle, causing bruising.
this is for 8 hours of sleep.....dont take it with humalog....humalog is only for when you eat and lantus only when you sleep....You guys have got some bad information and I would be afraid if I had your guy's doctors.... take it before you sleep ...just 25 units...
I'm not sure if you live outside of the USA, but my understanding is that Lantus is NOT available for use in a pen here in the US. My daughter just switched to Lantus via syringe & Novolog via pen after 8 years on an insulin pump. Her diabetes educator just gave her the Lantus prescription 3 days ago & said it is not available in any other form. I have read that outside the USA, however, it is sold in pen format.
So this is my personal preference -- in my case a pump cannot improve control since control is optimal right now with insulin injections. But the reality is that the Lantus is working 24 hours per day after injection and you can't completely turn that off like you can a pump. Glucose tablets may indeed be a wonderful solution for long exercise, partly because you can carry lots of them with you without having lots of baggage.
When you talk to your daughter's doctor, ask also about using Lantus insulin -- it is a long-acting insulin without a "peak." For many diabetics, Lantus once or twice a day works well with a rapid or short acting insulin to cover meals. One disadvantage (which may be why your daughter's doc has not suggested it) is that Lantus CANNOT be mixed with another insulin in the same syringe.
i was on lantus and it didnt work for me now im on humilin n and humilin r one for long the other for meals. and as far as stress try to find something that calms you.go for a walk listen to music and try try not to think to much and worry does the body no good. get in tune with your self and your future. do you know your body is insulin resistant?or just saying that. wow your ac 1 is 11.8 not good. i know i try to stay below 6.
I have decided that until I can lose weight and get my numbers in control that way that insulin might be a good choice for me. I am afraid that it constantly being that high is going to cause damage. I have tried other medications such as Actos and Januvia but they did not make that big a difference. I tried the Byetta as well with the same results. So I am not afraid of needles or injections. My question would be which insulin pens would be my best choice?
0 or below seem to protect people from complications. So the real issue isn't so much the occasional high level, but how long it is left high and how often this happens. The a1c is the best test of overall control, and your son is close to the goal level. For some, going to pump therapy seems to be the best way to keep the sugar levels stable, while for others there are other insulin regimens that work best.
I am just so frustrated right now. I recently changed primary care doctors (4-6 months ago) and re-started going to see my endocrinologist. Now, completely my fault, I ran out of my long acting insulin - lantus pens (opticlick) and cannot for the life of me get the darned thing refilled! I ran out Sunday, realized it Monday morning when I went to get a new cartridge, put in the refill to my pharmacy that morning, and heck broke loose!
She uses the smallest needles available for the pen. Her diet is very limited and on a daily basis she usually eats about 2 bowls of cucumbers with vinegar and a bit of olive oil and some type of protein, such as chicken or salmon. Her sugar is never consistant. Sometimes her sugar level reads 430, 525, 290 and so on through out the day and sometimes hits way low around 50. It is troubling to see my Mother struggle with this.
What preceded this event -- did you participate in anything stressful (good or bad stress can cause me to drop low)? Also, how old was your insulin -- if you use a long-lasting insulin like Lantus, if it is older than 1 month old, it can misbehave. I notice that I get "dumps" of insulin and will drop low during its peak time at about 4 hours after injection, or at about 5-6 pm, when I think its crystals just give up the ghost and cease to release slowly when my insulin is old.
When you say your body is starting to show signs of deterioration that may be too far. You have been diagnosed for 16 years and that is a long time so you are experiencing the natural progression of your diabetes. I assume you use diet and exercise as well to control your blood sugar? If you want more information and want to talk to others on the pump (I'm on MDIs myself) you might want to check out these websites tudiabetes.com and diabetesforums.
To be honest, I believe that she is been on Lantus for several months now and that it was hard on lantus to lose the weight that she thought she needed to. (you know...it is the "I need to get back into my normal or usual size" thing) One thin gI do have to add about my sis who an adult living with Type 1 is that, as I mentioned, like magkenmare's daughter she is on Lantus and Humalog, but I believe that an antidpressent or similar med.
thanks for the advice! =D well im not quite overweight yet, but i have a lot of flab, especially where I do my injections and its annoying =( any other suggestions?
The cost of the pump and supplies is very high. The pump only is good for about 5 years and then needs to be replaced. My son acquired a pump used only a few times, but then because he did not have insurance, he could not find an Endocrinologist who would even give him an initial visit, because of the ongoing cost and many office visits that would be required to maintain this treatment.
My son has been a Type 1 diabetic for 8 years. He is now 14 years old. It is an on-going battle between the two of us to get him to write down his sugar level and insulin when he checks. He is on a regimen of Lantus and Humalog and basically uses his own discretion when counting carbs and giving insulin. Does anyone have any suggestions on how we can better track his numbers, besides me following him around with a log book? He uses the Accu-Check Instant meter.
Popcorn (try it cooked on the stove with just a touch of healthy oil for real flavor) is good too because of the fiber content. With popcorn, however, when my daughter was on shots, was not substantial enough and she'd be low after eating it (mostly during the night). I believe it had to do with the digestion of this type of high fiber food though. How about Chex mix? You will find that you need to keep a variety of different foods in the house to avoid the boredom.
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