How does diltiazem work

Common Questions and Answers about How does diltiazem work

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I am currently on 30 mg of diltiazem 3x day and i was wondering how effective is this dose at bring down your blood pressure. and how much would it bring it down. a rough estimate would be great. for i am hoping to come off of this medicine.
Bear in mind that I am JUST a patient Dx'd w/and Tx'd for Atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is scripted to slow heart rate. How soon in the morning after waking were you taking your heart rate? 60 bpm is a normal heart rate during sleep and shortly thereafter wouldn't be of any particular concern. Were you using a blood pressure monitor to check your heart rate? How was your blood pressure? Did you take any notice of the pulse pressure? (Systolic minus diastolic equals pulse pressure).
Atenolol can and often does have an additive affect when taken along with other beta blocking meds. In my case, even though the Atenolol was only 25 mg, it was enough to cause several heart pauses (flatlines) of 3 to 4 second durations detected via an event recorder. Regarding the interaction between Diltiazem and Tambocor, this is from drugs.com: "Using diltiazem together with flecainide can increase the effects of either medication.
Ok then. Diltiazem does work pretty well for the Raynauds (I have it also) but not so good for sick sinus. I have Raynauds and arrhythmias. I noticed my PSVT wasn't so bad, the chest pains went away and the Raynauds improved during the 3 months I took it. But my heart rate did slow way down at times while on the med. So with your sick sinus syndrome, the doc may want to hold off the Diltiazem till you get the pacemaker. Keeping your rate up and steady is pretty important.
And see how long the wait times were. I have tried diltiazem, bisprolol, and atenol, none with any success. I have had sleeping pills, and Ativan and nothing gives relief to the monster in my chest. I feel like crap every single morning and have developed Anxiety and a huge fear of being alone. I am from such a small rural area that we don't have cbt offered anywhere near here. I have been to a talk therapist to try and relieve some anxiety over this, but talking is not helping!
Dry mouth and throat so bad that even drinking water it does not feel moistened. Head feeling so heavy and woozy, not dizzy per say just extremely fuzzy for a lack of description, My chest doest not hurt but it feels heavy? tight maybe? I don't know how to explain it. My BP which has always been on the low side (pre-pacemaker) is now anywhere from 117/68 to 149/90???? (I thought BB correct BP?
I can't get through the day without a nap and just feel too tired to even think most of the time. My blood work is always wonderful, even thyroid which I don't know how many times have had that test. With all of the flutters the I experience each day it hit me that perhaps just having an irregular heart beat might cause tiredness. So that is my question: can heart arrythmias cause tiredness?
I go through this every few months with the spasms, the intense reflux, abdominal pain etc.. I wind up off work for several days because I can't get it under control. How do I do this? I am tired of going through this every time I turn around. I have changed my eating habits, my sleep habits, also tried to decrease my stress level which is difficult since I work in critical care. Any suggestions on what else I can do?
I will be wearing an event monitor for the next week and will see from there?? Some people I work with tell me that a third abalation is not uncommon??? Is this true?? I am not liking things this way..It has been a year dealing with this??? Is it uncureable?? Thanks for all of the comments and help before this, you guys are great!!
Hey Michelle, I haven't seen you post anywhere in a few days and was wondering how things are going for you? Did you get anymore test results or help from the drs? Hope they have got your meds straightened out.
All of a sudden I developed a rapid (at rest) heart rate (2 weeks ago). It does not go away. In other words, it's not palpitations, it's a constant increased heart rate. Anywhere from 90 to 120s. 1. What sorts of things should I have tested in my blood? I had a CBC, cholesterol, fasting lipids, fasting glucose, and thyroid. All were normal except cholesterol was slightly elevated. Is there anything else (blood) that I should DEMAND be tested? 2. I had EKG done (abnormal).
Asked GP, ER doc, Urology Nurse (who prescribed cipro) and current Ortho and they said they have never seen anybody with fluoroquinolone induced tendinopathy. Each of the previous mentioned Doctor or Nurse does not know how to treat FIT. Each persons response has been "It will get better in a few months". Whats recovery time? What doc treats this? Will I compete again? Wait 6 months to work. Some people say they never get better... so NEVER work?
wow, thank you VERY much for that information. I definitely don't want to die while trying to control the pain, so that's good to know. Knowing about the hydromophone is good as well. I'm just getting really tired of dealing with the pain all the time, so I might bring that up at my next appointment.
I was prescribed Nitroglycerin sublingal spray (and calcium channel blocker Diltiazem), I was told that I should use the nitro whenever I get chest pain and to spray once wait 3 minutes if it doesn't work then spray again, if it doesn't work then call the doctor. (protocol was different last week when I was first prescribed tablet form). The problem is, if I use it every time I have pain, I will be taking it at least 13-14 times a day!.
If your thyroid is OK, and your heart has been repeatedly checked out and found to be OK, too, then, as you suspect, the problem is how to deal with the fear. For people who have a medicine phobia (pretty common, actually), treatment is necessarily going to be more difficult. You might try talking with a psychotherapist to see if you could learn some biofeedback or other mental exercises to help you calm yourself. Another resource that might help you is a small, inexpensive book by Dr.
My Dad has a Bi-V pacemaker/ICD and so far, indications are good that it has helped to improve his EF from 24% to low 40's. How long ago was your ICD implanted, and does it have a dual pacemaker? Here's to a long and full life!!! Be well!
I've been recovering from a cold and I think that is aggrivating things. Anyway, how do your spouses/significant others deal with things? I just feel extra bad that now my husband is scared. We just got married 6 months ago and he was aware that sometimes I have these episodes, but I've always been able to bring them down on my own, other than 1 attack that I had in my teens. I am now 32. The er docs referred me to a cardiologist and I'm sure more tests will be ran.
Some websites tell you about how to do it, but I find that holding your breath and pinch your nose while trying to exhale does not hit the right spot and does not work for me most of the time. What really works for me is to actually go to the restroom and pretend to do a bowel movement. Push as hard as you can several times (6 to 10 times) giving 30 seconds to 1 minutes between the pushes.
If your worried about it keeping you up, drink it at around 4pm, this seems to work better for me..It doesnt stop them totally, but it does reduce them to just minor sputters. Oh, last year we went up to the mountains on vacation. Once i was up high in altitude, dang those sputters. It really set them off like crazy. But, never once did i feel faint or weak. I ignored them and climbed until i was exhausted no matter how much my heart flipped flopped.
I tired calcium channel blockers for 2 weeks only but they do not work for me and i hated the side effects. Now i am thinking about an ablation. I have read very few success stories and many horror stories. Personally i'm afraid of the whole procedure and don't like the idea of scarring/burning areas of my heart. I just want to ask other SVT sufferers that have had an ablation for their experiences. After the procedure did you experience other arrythmias such as increased PVCS?
Does anyone know how long it takes for this stuff to work and whether it works at all? What about anti-depressents taken along with cardizem? Now doctor wants me to start an anti-depressent. How can these work for tachycardia?
I had a period of about 5 months where I was averaging 15-25 a minute all day and night. Really annoyed the socks off of me. How many times of PAT (PSVT) during that 24 hour period? How long did they last and what rate? If the beta blocker isn't helping, you can try the CCB. I'm taking Diltiazem and it helps me (reduces the number of ectopics and controls my chest pain). That's the thing with heart meds. One med will help one person but not another.
Diltiazem does that - it can make you feel dizzy, tired and give you a whopper of a headache. It took me about 2 weeks to adjust to the medication and another 2 weeks before the headache went away completely. Any idea how long your flutter lasts? If it happens frequently and lasts for a half hour or so, you may need aspirin or some other blood thinner. That's something you should discuss with your doctor. It wouldn't hurt to ask.
Dear Karie, I was prescribed Propranolol and I've been taking it for a month for PAC's, PSVT, and A-fib. Boy...does it ever work well! I only take 10 mg. twice a day ...a very low dose. Sometimes I will add another 2.5 mg. by breaking a half of a tablet in half again - depending on my stress level. I would say that my heart arrhyythmias have decreased by 85% or more! I am elated!! I hope you can find success, too. I hope that someday I can be symptom free. Better yet...how about HEALED?
Would consider re-challenge with tapazole, if that does not work then PTU is worth a try -- going to RAI is a backup plan for patients who prefer to try antithyroid drugs first. Ask your doctor about beta-blockers (like propanolol, etc) that don't cause bronchospasm -- such as metoprolol. Other options would be diltiazem or verapamil (calcium blockers) to slow the heart rate. Sometimes we need to use xanax-like medications for anxiety until the thyroid is controlled.
When I visit the ER I always am given the standard EKG, Chest X-Ray, and blood work. All normal. I am then summarily discharged with a form that states “The pain does not appear to be coming from your heart” Knowing the most ER doctors have a “treat them and street them” mentality I contacted a Cardiologist in 2010 who gave me a Thallium Stress Test. That too came back normal.
As post above said, DO your homework, pick a good electrophysicist cardiologist and you will do great! Also calcium channel blockers( diltiazem) did not work for me, beta blocker- atenolol does). Good luck!
Does this treatment seem reasonable and how soon would you expect noticeable changes if they occurred? Any other meds that might be tried or other advice? Does continued dilation of the blood vessels eventually stretch them or do they relax back when medication stopped? Is angioplasty on the old artery reasonable and does it have significant chance of success? Have you seen this done/work? Is there significantly more danger than the usual angioplasty?
Well after reading about calcium channel blockers it has become clear how they work. For smooth muscle, such as cardiac or artery, to contract, calcium is required and is fed through tiny channels in the artery wall. So, a reduction in calcium prevents smooth muscle from contracting as much, keeping vessels open more. HOWEVER, this also obviously affects the smooth muscle of the heart, making it contract slightly less. The bonus is the heart doesn't work so hard.
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