Hormone therapy breast growth

Common Questions and Answers about Hormone therapy breast growth

hormone

This is the notes of a doctor on my Mother's Cancer Report ""The positivity of ER/PR (hormones) means that the cancer relied on these hormones for growth. After surgery there will no doubt be prescribed a Hormone Therapy (Tamoxifen, etc.)"" What is "Hormone Therapy" How is it done? Is it costly enough???
Blocking the production of the hormone that the tumor depends on for growth certainly can reduce your risk of recurrance.
I have a damaged pituitary and Hashi's. My Growth Hormone blood test is 0.03 [0.01-8.00] I'm a 49yr old female, abnormal on all sex hormones. What is the normal for someone my age? I asked the doc if I need replacement GH and he says he doesn't know. When I called the ins. company about coverage, they asked for a diagnosis and treatment code, and I don't know these. Are there tests that you have to take in order to prove that your pituitary can't be stimulated to make this?
agreed, sounds like very low free test levels, and estrogen is building in your body, hence the gynomastic symptoms in your ahem pecs/breast... some hormone replacement therapy among other things should do the trick...
These cancers are considered to be more aggressive. This type of cancer cannot be treated with hormone therapy but can be treated with Herceptin. Regards ....
This is actually a breast cancer site and hormone therapy refers to breast cancer treatment.
Laboratory tests are performed after surgery or biopsy to determine if the breast cancer cells are hormone receptor positive. Hormone receptor positive breast cancer is depended on estrogen hormone for multiplication and growth and it is rational to block the hormones on which the tumor cells are feeding. Contrary to many people’s belief; hormonal therapy is a more effective form of breast caner adjuvant therapy compared to chemotherapy.
Dear maggie524, The decision to give adjuvant treatment (treatment given after surgery to try to prevent or minimize the growth of microscopic deposits of tumor cells that might grow into a recurrent tumor) is made based on several factors including; tumor size, stage of disease, tumor features, hormone receptor status, menopausal status, the patient's overall health, any other health concerns.
However, this has not been proven for the general public and there is not yet data to support whether or not this may apply more often in groups with higher risk. Hormone replacement therapy is not recommended for women who have had breast cancer as estrogen is known to contribute to the growth of many breast cancers. In other words, if your "mass" turns out to be benign - you could talk with doctors who might recommend continuing HRT or stopping HRT.
For many years it was not customary to treat Stage I breast cancer with chemotherapy or hormone therapy. Recent trials suggest that Stage I patients will benefit from adjuvant therapy. (Adjuvant treatment is treatment given after surgery to try to prevent or minimize the growth of microscopic deposits of tumor cells that might grow into a recurrent tumor).
Dear scouch01, Adjuvant therapy is treatment given after surgery to try to prevent or minimize the growth of microscopic deposits of tumor cells that might grow into a recurrent tumor.
I have heard that in market there is medicine called trastuzumab and its brand name if Herceptin. By this medicine can we stop the growth of breast cancer and sometimes reduce the size of the tumour ?
Hi, Hormone therapy means she will need to take tablets for at least 5 years, There are two commonly used groups of drugs now available for hormone therapy in breast cancer patients. The first is tamoxifen and similar compounds, and the second is aromatase inhibitors (leterozole and anastrazole). Side effect profiles are different in these two are different. Tamoxifen occasionally causes clotting problems like deep vein thrombosis.
Hortobagyi From the Departments of Breast Medical Oncology, Pathology, and Radiation Therapy, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Address reprint requests to Bryan Hennessy, MD, Dept of Medical Oncology, Box 10, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030; e-mail: ***@**** PURPOSE: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the breast is rare and generally aggressive.
A recent study confirmed the long-term superior efficacy and safety of anastrozole (Arimidex) over tamoxifen as initial adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive early breast cancer. It is apparently considered likely that this would hold true for the other AIs, such as Aromasin, but if you wish, you could ask your doctor about the possibility of trying Arimidex in place of Aromasin. Best wishes...
If she is an active 70 year old, without other health problems that would be a totally different decision than if she were very frail with many other health problems. Radiation therapy is standardly used in breast conservation surgery, meaning after a lumpectomy, to treat the remaining breast tissue. If a mastectomy was done radiation therapy would usually not be done.
This helps determine whether the cancer cells will respond well to hormone therapy, such as Tamoxifen, as a treatment option. These drugs work by inhibiting the estrogen receptors on precancerous cells, as estrogen has been linked to breast cancer growth. •Testing for HER-2 protein.This protein is overproduced in about one fourth of all breast cancers. If this protein is found in a biopsied tumor, then treatment with Herceptin (trastuzumab) may be an option.
Dear Ritavv, Research continues as to the mechanisms of action of tamoxifen and other hormone therapies for breast cancer. There is quite a bit of documentation of the effects of tamoxifen on the endometrium. Basically tamoxifen has both estrogen blocking as well as estrogen mimicking properties. This may explain why there are good and bad effects associated with its use.
In January of 2008 the FDA sent warnings to a number of large compounders of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) products, expressing concern about these manufacturers' claims about the safety, effectiveness, and superiority of their products. Please update us, by adding additional comments to this same thread, to let us know how things turn out.
It is obvious that the epidemic of ductal breast cancer cannot be due to all of these thousands of women being genetically flawed. It further suggests that there must be some common, underlying universal cause which we are overlooking and which, if identified, could be a target for PREVENTION. In the course of researching my wife's breast cancer I discovered that the doctors removed a toxic looking fluid from her ducts on two ocassions.
I am a breast cancer survivor of nearly two years. Mine was NOT responsive to hormone. I was diagnosed at Stage 1, my margins were clear. My tumor was at the far back of the breast, 2 centimeters in size. 15 lymph nodes were removed and not one of them had any indication of cancer. My problem is this: Half of my left hand has been numb for about a month now. It's numb & tingly in my pinky & ring finger, and the part of the hand just below those two fingers.
Until 40 years ago, women were treated more or less uniformly, with radical mastectomy, radiation and some form of primitive hormone therapy, such as removal of the pituitary gland. "Everybody was treated the same way, despite the fact that we knew some patients did well no matter what we did and other patients did poorly and died no matter what we did," says Dr. C. Kent Osborne, director of the Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
On the basis of available data, it is accepted practice to offer cytotoxic chemotherapy to most women with lymph node metastases or with primary breast cancers larger than 1cm in diameter (both node-negative and node-positive). Adjuvant hormonal therapy should be recommended to women whose breast tumors contain hormone receptor protein, regardless of age, menopausal status, involvement of axillary lymph nodes, or tumor size.
Does hormone therapy only help prevent a reoccurence in the breasts? Is breast cancer either ER+ or ER-, or are there degrees of how slightly or strongly a cancer is positive? Are there any benefits to hormone therapy (Aridimex) if the cancer is ER-?
Dear Becky, For many years it was not customary to treat Stage I breast cancer with chemotherapy or hormone therapy. These patients generally have a good prognosis, with only about one chance in four of further tumor spread. For cancers smaller than 1cm in diameter, the chance of recurrence is less than 10 percent within 10 years of diagnosis. Recent trials suggest, however, that Stage I breast cancer patients with tumors greater than 1 cm will benefit from adjuvant therapy.
Dear Fatia, According to the 2000 National Institute of Health Consensus Conference on Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy (treatment given after surgery to try to prevent or minimize the growth of microscopic deposits of tumor cells that might grow into a recurrent tumor) is recommended for the majority of women with primary breast cancers that are greater than 1 cm in diameter. This is independent of nodal, menopausal or hormone receptor status.
Many researchers have assumed that the link is estrogen a hormone that is known to increase breast-cancer risk and is found at higher-than-average levels in obese women. But obese women also have other hormonal imbalances that may play a role in triggering breast cancer. One such imbalance is elevated levels of insulin, which stimulates the growth of breast cells in tissue culture.
Radiation therapy is often used after a lumpectomy to kill any remaining cancer cells in the breast and under the arm. Hormone therapy Hormone therapy may be an option if your cancer relies on hormones to fuel its growth. Most invasive lobular carcinomas are hormone receptor positive, meaning they use hormones for fuel. A sample of your tumor cells is tested to determine whether your cancer is hormone receptor positive.
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