High protein urine dogs

Common Questions and Answers about High protein urine dogs

protein

Even though his BUN was normal, he is loosing protein in his ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e. When these <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> loose weight, they loose it quickly and you can really notice. I figured kidney or cancer when I took him in. I've been in contact with a Vet friend who is pretty Greyhound savy. Used to be, kidney failure called for ID food. She advised me not any more. It's not the amount of protein you have to watch but the source of the protein and the keeping the level of phosphorus down.
I have 3 trays in my freezer at all times for each that have different diets with there names on the trays. I started that for one of my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> years ago that had issues with high temps and I could not get him to drink when he was down. Now I just give them as summer treats.
She has no accidents in the house, no incontinence and does not ask for the door aside from our routine My vet at this time says that she is not too concerned about the gravity measurement since the rest of all results are normal and her condition otherwise is great. She states that a high water consumption can cause the ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e to be more dilute. She also states though we will look at this monthly alongside blood work. I am still worried though.
Does anyone know what what foods have NO protein or LOW protein that is good for <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span>?? Are there any dog treats that are <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> Free or low <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> that is good for my Julie?? Any help is greatly appreciated.
If you have a very sensitive nose you may be able to smell it even if your dog only has mild kidney problems Very high <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> diets produce more urea and this can also contribute to the smell. Raw diets are very high protein diets, obviously. What may have been a healthy diet for your dog when he was younger may no longer be suitable now that he is a senior citizen. I am not opposed to pasteurized raw diets in some select patients; however, I don't believe that one diet fits all patients.
says that because protein is metabolized in the kidneys that a low-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> diet is called for. Unfortunately, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> must have <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> or they will be malnourished. More recent studies show that low-protein diets make no difference, whereas focusing on calcium as a phosphorus reduce does help. I found it easier (and cheaper) to make my own dog food. Dark meat chicken is a great alternative to prescription food along with rice and white bread.
The vet told me that with early stage kidney insufficiency, their kidneys actually start to produce more urine, and it can vary, owing to what kind of toxins they need to filter out on a certain day. He said any high <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> foods which produce what he called "nitrogenous waste" (which a dog with healthy kidneys can process just fine) -dogs with kidney failure cannot, and the kidneys work overtime to try to compensate.
The reason being human grade chicken is high quality <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span>, rather than low quality often found in manufactured dog foods or chicken intended for dogs. Again, this is explained more in the article I wrote. You do have to be a little careful of baby food, though I understand your reason for giving it. Sometimes it contains things that are not good for dogs with kidney failure. You just have to check the ingredients carefully.
My dog, a 10 year old female bichon frise, Daisy, was diagnosed with a kidney problem about 8 weeks ago. After having blood tests and a ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> screen my vet explained that the kidneys were functioning, but that too much protein was passing thru holes in the kidneys. The vet put her on a low protein diet (Hill's Prescription Diet U/D, canned), prescribed 1/2 tablet of 5 mg. Enalapril twice daily and instructed me not to give her anything high in protein.
Dark meat poultry, fatty hamburger, ground lamb, and canadian bacon are good choices. Of course, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> in renal failure are so nauseated, it's hard to get them to eat anything, so if she won't eat the low-phosphorus foods, just get something in her. To counteract phosphorus, give her one or two Tums antacid tablets a day - or any indigestion tablet that is primarily calcium. The calcium binds with phosphorus and carries out of the body so it can't do further harm to the kidneys.
protein to non-protein ratio should be in the 15% to 18% range and that <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> should be of very high quality (human-grade chicken or other meats) --well, look at Pitcairn's book or check out chf diets online. The meds impact their kidneys and they can die of renal failure from a diet that is not specifically tailored to chf. Not that hard to do and hope I haven't made it seem that way but it's def'ly more than opening a can or dumping some kibble out in 2 minutes.
Hi! My <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> levels of ALKP and ALT are high also, and he has been on a natural balance diet of Bison and Sweet Potato! He has been eating this for the past few years since he has many food allergies. Did you find out what was the cause of the high levels in your dogs blood? Any improvements? He is going for an ultrasound next week, but Im trying to find a holistic approach to this. Thanks!
It is usually the result of slow age-related deterioration of the kidneys. Signs of Pet Kidney Disease initially <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> and cats drink and urinate excessively. The ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e produced is dilute so dogs become dehydrated and drink a lot to try to replace the lost fluids. No matter how much they drink; they are unable to maintain normal hydration. Advanced signs of Kidney Disease include weight loss, vomiting, depression and loss of appetite.
My puppy is a 7 month old Sheltie, and we recently found out that her BUN level is normal/high (in the 14 range), when she was going to get spayed. She had a blood test and a ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e test done, and everything else was normal except for her BUN level. The doctor has put her on a low protein diet, formulated for dogs with kidney problems. Is there anything else I can do to help lower her level? What is causing this? and is this something that I should be extremely worried about?
Generally blood and ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e tests reveal the severity of canine kidney failure and appropriate medications, traditional and/or natural are effective to treat kidney conditions so as to maintain a nice quality of life for many years. If you are able to post and share your dogs lab tests, I am glad to review them and offer you specific suggestions regarding canine kidney therapy.
That means wet food is best because it contains mostlywater. Also a food that is high in <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> low in carbohydrates andphosphorous is best. in my research I found a less expensivealternative. The details are below for you viewing. My general question.If you were in my position. Would you try the below item instead ofstaying with the vets urinary so. If not would you know of a goodalternative that contains real meat that would do the job.
Hi, BUN is a blood value (blood urea nitrogen) used as a marker of kidney function. If high it is consistent with, but insufficient to make that diagnosis. It is affected by <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> level in diet, tissue turnover (growth) and other factors. For an accurate assessment of kidney function creatinine, assessed in tandem with urine concentration is far more helpful. Laboratories set their normal ranges by looking at many normal dogs values in your area and in its population of tests.
initially dogs drink and urinate excessively. The ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e produced is dilute so <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> become dehydrated and drink a lot to try to replace the lost fluids. No matter how much they drink; they are unable to maintain normal hydration. Advanced signs of Kidney Disease include weight loss, vomiting, depression and loss of appetite. Signs are not apparent until 80 percent of kidney function is already lost. Routine diagnostics include blood and urine tests as well as abdominal x-rays.
One of my dogs has a form of kidney disease - <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> in his ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e - which is caused by several large cysts in his kidneys. He also has high blood pressure which affects his kidneys. At diagnosis his protein-creatine ratio was over 5, and he was pretty miserable. Not eating well, nauseated, losing weight and lethargic. He is now on enalapril and a couple of supplements and we are home cooking a diet for him that we put together with the help of the yahoo group.
My dog, a 10 year old female bichon frise, Daisy, was diagnosed with a kidney problem about 8 weeks ago. After having blood tests and a ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> screen my vet explained that the kidneys were functioning, but that too much protein was passing thru holes in the kidneys. The vet put her on a low protein diet (Hill's Prescription Diet U/D, canned), prescribed 1/2 tablet of 5 mg. Enalapril twice daily and instructed me not to give her anything high in protein.
creatinine at Mandy's levels but who are not losing <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> often eat well. He also said <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> with <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> losing issues are prone to blood clots forming. Since putting Mandy on sucralfate and zantac, she seems to be feeling much better and her appetite has improved. We go back to the ACVIM vet on Oct. 21 at which time he's going to discuss aspirin and Calcitriol therapy. As for her BP meds, several months ago, Mandy had developed a bad cough.
If the urinalysis shows that your puppy can concentrate his ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e then his kidneys are currently functioning fine. Again if you are still concerned after the urinalysis you could also consider an abdominal ultrasound. This is a test where we can look at all the abdominal organs with sound waves. Many congenital kidney diseases will show up on this tests. The fact that your puppy is energetic and playful and that his urine is yellow makes me less concerned.
Your vet can perform a Ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span>-Creatinine ratio which checks for early kidney disease even before the kidney disease shows up in blood work. If there is protein in the urine and no urinary tract infection than your vet can treat your dog for early kidney disease to help prevent additional damage. However, protein can show up in the urine if there is a urinary tract infection. If there is a urinary tract infection, that should be treated with antibiotics, obviously.
Hi...Next week. I am starting my beloved 9 yr. old mini Poodle Julie on Trilostane for confirmed Cushings Disease. She is 14 lbs.now & never stops drinking water & has to go outside way too much. Her appetite is immense. All of this is so abnormal with her, along with her "pot belly" & she is very non energetic. She was just diagnosed & I am very stressed about treatments. I know that I will never use Lisodren on her. Trilostane will be my choice.
It is usually the result of slow age-related deterioration of the kidneys. SIGNS initially <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> drink and urinate excessively. The ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e produced is dilute so dogs become dehydrated and drink a lot to try to replace the lost fluids. No matter how much they drink; they are unable to maintain normal hydration. Advanced signs of Kidney Disease include weight loss, vomiting, depression and loss of appetite. Signs are not apparent until 80 percent of kidney function is already lost.
30 (which I think is 1+) (normal 0-30) Hematocrit: 54% (normal 37-55%) His BUN and creatinine both went up slightly in the 4.5 month period. However, his phosphorous went down, and his hematocrit went up. I know that in kidney disease phosphorous is high and hematocrit is low, so these levels seems to be pretty good. Also, Boomer's creatinine levels have always been between 1.2 and 1.6 prior to the blood tests mentioned above. Is it possible that he just has naturally higher levels?
I did bring him back to the vet. He has high levels of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> and casts from his kidney in his ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e. The blood work came back normal. He seems to be doing well now...he is currently taking pain and antiinflamatory meds. He has a couple days left of that. We will be taking another urine, this time fasting in two weeks. The vet recommended we wait until he has been off the meds for a couple of weeks.
# The opportunity to observe mom eating stool # High <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span>, low residue, puppy food # Irregular feeding schedule # Feeding inadequate amounts of food # Under-stimulating environment (lack of daily exercise and fun) # Constant opportunity to ingest feces (unclean yard area) # inadequate attention/supervision (dogs need stimulating environment!!) # Medical reasons (mal-absorption, pancreatic) There are some dietary remedies that have been used, but most don't work very well.
I need some suggestions on a grain free dog food. I have a Shih Tzu who is going in for surgery soon to have two large bladder stones removed. He also has two small ones in his kidney. The vet keeps talking about getting him started on Hill's diet. I have no intention of buying this food from them. I have reminded her three times that he needs to be on a grain free food.
To check kidney pancreas, and liver function, and also get her thyroid checked. And take a ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e sample to check if there is an unusual amount of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prote<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span></span> in her ur<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span>e.
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