Heart operation open heart surgery

Common Questions and Answers about Heart operation open heart surgery

operation

Many individuals following open heart surgery have a memory problem for about 6 months post operation. Open heart surgery puts the individual on heart and lung machine so the fibrosis is probably not an issue during the operation. The main problem with the heart is the valve orifice and that can be corrected without open heart surgery (sometimes). The aorta regurgitation can be the cause of shortness of breath as well as the pulmonary issue. What is the operation expectation.
my aunt in Israel had an open heart surgery, 4 days after operation she can lay down, can't breath, only can seat up or walk, she did not sleep for 4 nights, what can be wrong ?
My husband is 31 years old & just went through open heart surgery to repair his mitral valve. He had severe regurgitation. Since before he went in for the surgery he has been taking Cardizem 120 & even after surgery they kept him on the medication with 1 baby aspirin a day. They said they would monitor him for the next few months and decide if he can come off or not. Since then he had his echo cardiogram & they reported his heart muscle function has decreased.
my father is 65 years old he made an open heart surgey 10 years ago last week he was kept in the hospital for a week for a chest pain doctors says he need a second open heart surgery this is the report the doctor give us: Diagnosis: Recent Lateral CABG (10 Years) MI LIMA LAD SVG D1 Coronary Angiography LMCA: Free LAD: Totally Occluded after S1 and a small D1 Cx : Mid Total Occlusion RCA: La
What surgery did you have? I believe Bypass i also called open heart surgery, but I don't know why. I had mitral valve surgery at age 67 and had none of the postop symptoms, so my experience says only you are have more trouble than I did. I suppose my sternum may be a little uneven and there are times when I wish the doctor had used a straight edge to cut me open as the long vertical cut is on a bit of an angle compared to the perpendicular.
I had open heart surgery in 8/2005 it is now 3/2006. I had a quad bypass. Before my surgery I had little to NO BREATHING PROBLEMS, I had chest pain when I worked hard in the hot FL sun, who don't. I was told that I would die if I didn't get the bypass surgery right away. I was also told that I would not survive a heart attack, that my widomaker valve was not working, and my other veins in heart were 80% 60 % 70 % clogged.I was talked into the surgery.
Why have you decided against bypass surgery? blockages of 90,99,90% are severe and he could end up with a lot of dead heart muscle, causing heart failure. If the hernia isn't causing major problems, I would leave it alone. In many cases surgery isn't a long term fix. Just coughing can cause the muscle to re-open and cause the hernia again. I have a small one and the recommendation was to leave it alone.
My friends father recently suffered a heart attack and was advised to undergo angiography. The test showed 100% blockage in two of his arteries and was recommended open heart surgery. He is 61 years old and has suffered from hypertension and high blood pressure for the past 3 years. He has lived with the fear of doctors and surgeries all his life and is now strongly refusing to undergo the surgery. No amount of convincing from the doctor or the family seems to help.
, and she said that, statistically, women do not tolerate or survive open-heart surgery as well as men. I'm 49 and will probably need the surgery sooner or later. Right now, I am not having symptoms and my ejection fraction is 65%. I'm so afraid of having this done to begin with, and now that I hear that women have more adverse effects and there is a chance of not surviving this, I'm even more afraid.
This is the most difficult decision either of us has ever had to make and we are being torn in two different directions, especially because my brother-in-law had open heart surgery 6 years ago and has not spoken a word since the operation. What would be my husband's prognosis if he does not have the surgery and what are the chances of further memory loss if he does? I might add that he is not overweight and does not have other health problems such as diabetes, etc.
Hello everyone -- I am a 56 yr. old female & I have undergone Open-Heart Surgery three times in my life. The first two Open-Heart's took place in 1975 when I was 24 years old. The surgeries were performed in Houston TX by the world renowned Dr. Denton Cooley. I had the aortic & the mitral valve replaced with mechanical valves. I had done wonderfully for 31 years up until last year, March/06 I had to go back to Houston & have the aortic valve replaced with another mechanical (St.
All that said, I have done a lot of research on the subject and found other than direct open heart surgery there are other less invasive procedures as well. We will find out from the surgeon which one he is a candidate for. Essentially, we're all scared. I would like to hear from an experienced cardio physician, or surgeon what he may be facing.
I consider what you describe to be bypass surgery, not open heart surgery, that is your heart was not opened. I could be wrong on that "fine" point, but to your cold limbs question I can say I had open heart surgery to repair my mitral valve and to do a mini-maze procedure on the inside of my heart to try to stop atrial fibrillation. This was done in November of 2007, and I have not noticed any increased sensitivity to cold temperatures or colder hands/feet...
If the valve requires replacement, then the open heart surgery is required. Some medications can damage heart valves, and I practicing doctor should know and would be the best source for that information.
My otherwise healthy husband had open heart surgery last week to replace a calcified bicuspid valve and ascending aorta which had an aneurysm. Surgery went well but when we arrived home he began suffering from spasms in his diaphram. This is constant and often severe. Neither his excellent, experienced surgeon, nor any of his other doctors, had heard of this and are attempting ot control it with muscle relaxers (which doesn't seem to help much).
Open heart surgery is scary, but I think the doctors are considering your age when making the decision of bypass versus stents. Bypass surgery fixes the arteries, which may be crooked or turned. Stents are more like band-aids in which they help and extend life, but don't necessary fix the problem. When arteries are not straight enough, the blood rushing through can cause a spot that becomes inflammed and sticky.
Hi, I have to say I got a big grin on my face when I read the name Vince Gaudiani. He did my first open heart surgery when he was at the National Institute of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The first thing I remember when I came to was him saying "She's got great lungs." : ) Nice to hear he's still around and doing great work. You'll be in good hands. Hope all goes well. Cheers!
what would be surgery risk for re-operation for avr replacement for a healthy 62 year old, with no major (liver, kidney, lung) disease in which a Bentall procedure was done in the first operation done 8 years earlier? also, what would the complications risks be for each related, possible complication?
Hi, My dad had a heart operation a little less than 2 days ago as he had aortic dissection and aortic valve regurgitation (was urgent). The operation was successful as far as i know but he still hasn't woken up properly yet. The doc at ICU said he should be awake, they took him for a scan to see if he had a stroke but there was no sign of a stroke.
I had a son with HLHS and he would have dies within the forst week of like if he didnt have open heart surgery. His second surgery was at 6 months to give him time to heal from the first surgery. I dont know all about what your talking about, but the one thing I do know is with the heart, usually the sooner its done, the better. If they wait too long, the heart muscles can become damaged and enlarged and weaker making the surgery and recovery more difficult.
My husband had emergency double bypass heart surgery 6 days ago and he still won't wake up. The doctors are saying he is scattered brained. He has been tested and there is no evidence of a stroke. His eyes don't focus and he flings his arms and legs around and he won't follow any commands. It's like he is not there. He is still on the breathing machine at 35%when he came out of surgery, he was at 100%. Can anybody help me with some information?
MY HUSBAND STEVE HAD HEART BYPASS A COUPLE YRS AGO AND NOW THEY BELIEVE HE NEEDS STENTS. HE DOESNT WANT TO GO THROUGH A MAJOR OPERATION AGAIN AND IF HE HAS THIS DONE, CAN YOU TELL ME IF THEY HAVE TO BREAK HIM OPEN AGAIN OR IS IT A SIMPLE PROCEDURE ?
from Google Search: "Open heart surgery costs in the region of $40,000 in USA and £25,000 in the UK, but can cost as little as $5 - 7,000 in India, a saving of up to $35,000!" ....
Hello, i am 16 and i've had 3 open heart surgeries and an additional heart surgery.. i've had to ross procedure, coartation of the aorta. fixed the whole in my heart, valve repair, .. my last operation about 3 years ago was to fix a big arterie, it was getting bigger and losing its elasticity, ever since i've had the surgery ive had headachs and migrains. The migrains started about 3 days after the operation when I was concious enough to notice them.
also please give me a summary of what are the possibilities for brain dead during open heart surgery? Please help us to know about our boy's death. Thanks in advance, Thennarasu.
So far, we have done 3 times of ultrasonic cardiography to track the problem(as below comment). The specialist in China says he need to have open-heart surgery as soon as possible(8~10 months) to avoid AP and AI. I would like to know, in this case, whether open-heart surgery is the only way to deal with the hole?Is it possible to use intervention?
At the beginning of this year I had open-heart surgery, to repair a leaking valve. Only about 4 1/2 months later (mid to late April) I began to experience left-sided twitching and spasms, particularly within my left hand/arm and foot. I underwent a MRI scan and everything (psychologically) seemed to be fine. I believe it's a nerve within one of my ribs that has been 'pinched' or affected in some way during the recovery process. But it's now September, and the twitching still remains.
MedHelp Health Answers