Graves disease named after

Common Questions and Answers about Graves disease named after

graves-disease

You have Graves Disease. RAI is irreversible and I try not to force patients into it but it is a very effective treatment and despite what you read on the internet most patients do fine with synthroid treatment (if the TSH is kept in appropriate range -- 0.5-2.0, unfortunately this is not always done). Being hyper long-term has large risks to the heart and bone, so that is not a good option. Your levels reflect mild-moderate hyperthyroidism but getting worse than the first set.
I am not on any anti-depressants, just Levothyroid. My opinion the graves disease really did a number on my entire health, but all I know to do is grin and bear it, because doctors don't believe me when I tell them why all of these medical issues are coming up. Hang in there.....
Pretibial myxedema, an uncommon skin disorder, occurs not in cases of hypothyroidism but in hyperthyroid states, including, most commonly, Graves disease. The term pretibial is somewhat misleading, because the condition can affect other areas of the body and could more accurately be called localized dermopathy. The other skin condition, called myxedema, occurs in severe, long-standing hypothyroid states and is caused by the deposition of mucopolysaccharides within the dermis.
At the age of 22 he entered the new medical school at Kyushu University and was one of its first graduates in 1907. Graves disease is named after Robert J. Graves, MD, circa 1830s Happy New Year - Good Luck and Best Wishes for 2008.
She said she did plant it and in July this year, it finally started to look like it was coming to life. (btw..that aunty (the eldest of my grandmothers children is named Clarice after her own Aunty!). And...my Mum's rose bloomed last year in about October (Spring here) and is looking lovely and healthy for this Spring. Those white roses are our angels! Not quite sure why I wanted to share this story, just thought it was nice. Happy gardening. Peace and love.....
Hashimoto's Disease (named after the japanese doc who discovered it) is autoimmune thyroid disease. It is the most common reason for hypothyroidism. autoimmune basically means it is triggered by environmental or hormonal factors, often childbirth or menopause...and that it has a genetic component. The frustrating thing about Hashimoto's is that the thyroid antibodies that appear in the disease can cause problems even before the thyroid hormones fall out of range.
Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (also called autoimmune or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common type of thyroiditis. It is named after the Japanese physician, Hakaru Hashimoto, that first described it in 1912. The thyroid gland is always enlarged, although only one side may be enlarged enough to feel.
Moore and Lisa Moore called Graves Disease a Practical Guide, and then there is Thyroid Eye Disease Understanding Graves Opthalmopathy, by Elaine A. Moore. I know it is named for the eyes, but it also gives great advice about thyroid disorders and other Auto Immune disorders. Anyone recently having been told they have a thyroid disorder SHOULD read these Books before making a major decision like surgery or RAI 131. You can order them online.
I still have a lot of symptoms and medical problems, but I finally got frustrated enought to tell her i had some autoimmune disease that no lab work will ever find. I also told her that ever since Graves disease my body had never been the same, it some how go re-wired. By the way, they did the re-scan on the mass by my spine and it is some type (can't remember the name) of rare tumor (starts with a g is about all i can remember).
Now I avoid this particular cold cut for the salt content it may have for possibly triggering my hyperthyroidism or make my graves disease worst.
She begrudgingly took the prescription and started the next morning on a 20 mg dose of Lovan. After a few weeks with no change in symptoms it was declared that this Magic Pill was not going to be enough. "Let's increase to 40mgs!" The poor lady stated, "But I don't wanna go up a dose!" But regrettably did, just to prove a point that she was not infact, nuts.
I have all your symptoms and was diagnosed with Graves Disease and Hyperthyroidism. Have you had a thyroid panel done...FT3, FT4, TSH,> And have you been tested for Graves and Hashi's antibodies? I think that would be your next step if you havent been tested for antibodies. I was going from hyper to hypo every 2 weeks.....it was a time I would never want to go through again.
Best to go to legit medical sites or thyroid org such as, Thyroid Foundation of Canada - Graves' Eye Disease (Opthalmopathy) | thyroid John Hopkins University - Eye disease related to Graves' disease Allthyroid.org Eye Problems Associated with Graves Disease The New England Journal of Medicine. - Relation between Therapy for Hyperthyroidism and the Course of Graves' Ophthalmopathy Too many for me to list them all but they are listed at http://groups.msn.
I'm so frustrated with people and their opinionated BS about how people choose to name their children! My uncle had the nerve to message me today asking what we named the baby. When I told him it was Nadezdha Lilith, he texted me back a message of "why would you name her that, she is part Italian too.." I replied with, because "that is what we chose to name her".
I have Severe Graves Disease Hyperthyroidism, Thyroid Eye Disease and Thyrotoxic Myopathy. What levels mean what?? I have a complete mental block and I really need to pay attention to this as I am obviously not well at all and I must keep on top of this. Thanks so much guys.
The literature also states that before hyperthyroidism was recognized as a disease, many patients with Graves' disease spent their days in asylums. Emotional changes in Graves' disease are primarily caused by the effects of excess thyroid hormone on thyroid receptors in the brain. Emotional disturbances may also result from nutrient deficiencies and exhaustion. Cognitive changes in GD caused by hormonal imbalances also weaken the ability to cope with stress.
SHe was given the treatment because she had Graves disease and her blood work was actually getting better but they gave it to her anyway. Her sense of taste and smell has been gone for 5 years and she has had all kinds of other issues. When she questioned her doc about why it was necessary to put her through all that he said he did it because "she wanted it". He said she probably didn't even need it in hindsight, oh well.
If you look up Graves Disease that is what hyper is. It is Hashimoto when you go hyper. It's important you get a good endo doc and see him right away. It's very confusing because all of the stuff is backwards to what you would think would make sense (when your TSH is low it means the body is producing too MUCH thyroid hormone and when it's high it means it's making not enough). The medicine just controls it so it is a level amount every day.
Before I found the thyroid forum on MedHelp I felt like no one understood anything I had been going through for over 7 years in my struggle with Graves' disease and then being hypo after RAI and too low replacement dose. But once I found this forum and all these people who were just like me, had the same symptoms, same complaints, and same problems as I did I found my sense of humor again. I have felt so alone for so many years and now I have friends again.
Everything was normal, but they decided to watch me one more night. The cardiologist said he thought I might have costochondroitis and pluerisy. After supper that evening I developed cramping and nausea and ended up throwing up and having diarrhea all night. My blood pressure dropped to 70/49, so they made me get up and eat. They released me after two days with no diagnosis except probable costochodritis and pluerisy.
Have not heard or seen one post mentioning RAI being a “safer, better” option and becoming hypo after RAI is just as difficult and its seems filled with more problems that being hyper. Can a person live on hyper ATD’s for the rest of their life successfully, mind you I will always check with my physician but can they, if so how long (time span wise, months, years?) can this ATD route last a graves patient like myself? (please Dr.
Oh, here's another quote. This one from: http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1045.htm "Oncocytic cells in the thyroid are often called Hürthle cells, and oncocytic change is defined as cellular enlargement characterized by an abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm as a result of accumulation of altered mitochondria. This is a phenomenon of metaplasia that occurs in inflammatory disorders, such as thyroiditis, or other situations that result in cellular stress.
Elequin - respectfully - please research more on the Graves disease foundation - thyroid info.com site - the ATA - the AACE - and others that can help you understand more on reading the US guidelines for labs on thyroid disease. I am sorry to say but this information - while credible IF a thyroid storm is an issue - it does not pertain here as clear information to the poster asking for information.
I agree with the previous posts. I have Graves Disease which also has the same symptoms and requires a thyroid test. So hang in there, sometimes it takes a while for these things to be properly diagnosed and treated.
I would also ask them to do some antibody testing for graves and Hashimoto's Autoimmune thyroid disease. Hope you feel better soon!
I am obsessed with trying to make my hair look and feel like it did before being diagnosed with Graves Disease and treated with RDI and taking Levothyroxin for years. I have not found anything helpful to date. I am so frustrated!!! I went from having oily hair which I had to wash every day to not washing it for 3 days just to prevent hair from falling out in the shower and breaking while combing after the shower!!! I seriously have tried everything and nothing has helped!!
Then I went in quite ill one time and my bloodwork showed I was extremely Hyperthyroid. Suddenly I had Grave's disease instead. After a lot of frequent bloodwork and a lot of horsing around with several doctors it was discovered that my levels were swinging up and down every week, and what my tests showed just depended on what day I walked into the lab. That "one time" was sixteen months ago and it has been hell ever since trying to treat it.
Thanks Mike, I will definitely do my best to try what you suggested. I've lost so much strength in my large muscles with this graves disease & immobility the past couple of years. I can't beleive how much a disease can effect a person. I also have B-12 deficiency & what ever it is (with my blood...polycythemia vera?, high RBC's, WBC's,Neutrophils, hgb, hct. The jury is still out on that. All of these cause fatigue & that hasn't helped. I was actually a very health individual.
A Summary The thyroid gland secretes mostly T4 and very little T3. Most of the T3 that drives cell metabolism is produced by action of the enzyme named 5'-deiodinase, which converts T4 to T3. (We pronounce the "5'-" as "five-prime.") Without this conversion of T4 to T3, cells have too little T3 to maintain normal metabolism; metabolism then slows down. T3, therefore, is the metabolically active thyroid hormone. For the most part, T4 is metabolically inactive.
I can relate to the not being able to get out of bed with the thyroid problem because that was me back in 2001 before I was diagnosed with Graves disease. That's exactly why I left my job. I am in remission still right now, but next time the thyroid is hyper. it is time for RAI. My docs. are worried that I have been on the thyroid meds. for too many years now. Last time I was in remission for 8 months. I have passed that this time. It's been 9 months so far. Hurray!
MedHelp Health Answers