Grand mal seizure in dogs

Common Questions and Answers about Grand mal seizure in dogs

seizure

This is documented in humans but not yet in dogs, but I believe it can occur in dogs also. That may or may not be the cause of seizures in your dog. Seizures in dogs can occur secondary to trauma, metabolic disease, lesions or tumors in the brain, from a variety of infectious causes, toxins, and, ideopathic causes. Ideopathic means of unknown cause.
Those are basically what are considered to be grand mal seizures. Petite mal seizures can be anything from a twitching of the head to a state of catatonia for a brief time, which sounds more or less like what your girl had. Please let us know what the vet says when you do get to take her in. Good luck to you! It's very scary when something is wrong with one of our furkids and we don't know what it is.
A partial seizure involving the face often lasts longer and occurs more frequently than a facial tic that happens in conjunction with a larger, grand mal seizure. Dogs who are severely affected by facial mal seizures may suffer as many as five to 10 episodes an hour, or as few as one every few months. Facial seizures that accompany grand mal seizures most often occur in the aura phase of a seizure.
Within seconds he was in a full blown (MASSIVE) Grand Mal Seizure. I have a gf who has Grand Mal Seizures. Honestly, this was 100 x's worse! It lasted for well of 45 seconds!!! Frankly, I did not think he was going to make it. He could not breath during the seizure, and I started to question if he was having a heart attack or choking. I immediately rushed him to our vet, who began running all the tests others have listed in this forum (within 2 hours of the attack).
We have an 8 year old Lab/Shepard mix who had a grand mal seizure in the middle of the night. The Vet wanted to wait to start any med's to see if the seizure was from a toxin or something more serious. Six weeks later he had another seizure, this time we'd done our research and used a medical grade essential oil during the seizure which brought him out of the seizure quickly.
Does anyone know if a dog (like a human) is aware when having a grand mal seizure?
My golden who turns 14 in two days had a grand mal seizure at the beginning of November, then was seizure-free until the beginning of February. She had three seizures over a 72-hour period so the vet put her on phenobarbital, 75mg twice a day. She was ambulatory when she returned from the vet's the evening of the third seizure (disoriented to be sure), and the following day until that evening when she walked into the room in which she usually spent most of her time, laid down and won't get up.
Hi, Our Mini, fudge, had his first grand mal seizure about a month ago, late on the Saturday night. Afterwards he got very excitable trying to run about and making a high pitched noise before we managed to calm him down. The next morning the same thing happened although not as severe. We took him to the vets who ran the usual blood work which came back clear as expected. We were told that it was probably epilepsy but the vet was reluctant to put him on medication for life.
Make a note of when the seizure happened, what time of day and any other circumstances like music playing or even visitors in the home. Seizures in older dogs tend to be one-time episodes and nothing to worry about. In young dogs such as yours, it may mean the beginning of a lifetime of epilepsy. Keeping meticulous records can help you and your vet find triggers that can be avoided. Our vet had one patient who seized every time the doorbell rang.
The fact that your dog had a fever when she had the seizure leads us to believe that the seizure had an infectious cause. However, seizures themselves (if grand mal) can cause a dogs temperature to become elevated. Brain tumors can disrupt normal brain activity and therefore cause seizures. The problem is, if the Lyme disease is in the chronic stage it is very difficult to eliminate.
Since the dog is unconscious during a seizure, it is not likely that she noticed the water on her face or that it had any effect on her (however, you should stay away from the face/mouth during a seizure in case the dog snaps her jaw - you do not want your fingers there!).
Seizures - which the shakes sound like - take many forms and are not always the full-blown epileptic type of Grand Mal seizure. It could be that he has been having seizures for some months, but that they were so slight, they weren't manifesting in a visible or noticeable way. Has your vet considered whether this shaking is in fact a seizure? Or has he determined it is due to anxiety or something else?
5 months may 18/present its hell if i dont get help so i am going to get a grand mal seizure or some other seizure and die every single night i sleep all of a sudden my brain feels like its moving... i am scared that i have a cancer and they cant find and i want to fix my body because i feel like crap no energy nobody in my family believe i have cancer i feel it i am so sensitive to lights that i feel like falling down..
Hello and welcome to the Dogs community! No, dogs aren't supposed to have seizures. In younger dogs, say 4 and under, the cause is usually idiopathic. That means there's not any clear reason like a tumor or other lesion in the brain causing the seizures. In senior dogs, it's more likely that there is a growth of some kind, but not always. Most seizures can be well controlled with phenobarbitol and/or other medications.
Over time the grand mal seizures subsided and then stopped. Six months later he had grand mal seizures for about a week. Then that stopped. He continued having petit mal like seizures every now and then. He started on Phenobarb initially, but I wasn't able to continue it because I couldn't catch him. Even without Pheno, his grand mal seizures seemed to stop on their own with these small seizures happening infrequently. Now he has begun having grand mal seizures again.
I take phenergan myself for constant nausea, and discovered late in the game that dogs can also take phenergan. It didn't work quite as well as the reglan, but at that point we tried anything we could get our hands on. Over the counter Dramamine for motion sickness can be tried as it is metabolized in the liver - got that info from an ER vet nearby.
There is an excellent thread regarding phenobarbital dosing and side effects in dogs having seizure activity. My family is in a similar situation, our 9 year old coon hound in excellent health had 3 grand mal seizures in less than 24 hrs. We had a basic work up done at the vet after the first seizure which essentially came back normal. We have started her on phenobarb and prednisone, but I am glad I checked out the thread b/c I did not know the medication side effects were so profound...
I've been smelling smoke for about a year also and about a month I had a grand mal seizure. I was told it is an uncommon but possilbe link so just mention it. I think the term for a "phantom smell seizure" is a partial seizure. Once again, this is only to help you ask questions and not to scare you.
These symptoms last only a few seconds, which is why they are often either overlooked or missed entirely by the dog's owner. The grand mal seizure is what people think of when they picture an epileptic seizure. It involves severe tremors, paw paddling, convulsions, loss of consciousness, and often uncontrolled urination or defecation. These symptoms last usually one to two minutes, although when it's your dog having the seizure, it's the longest one or two minutes of your life.
Stress anxiety (including noise anxiety) is not uncommon in dogs that suffer from seizures, including epileptic dogs. Unfortunately, stress and anxiety are the very elements that can induce a seizure, so it is crucial to try and keep him as calm as possible and particularly during times when things like fireworks are being set-off outside. I know this can be very difficult.
seizures, where the dog is conscious and begins to behave erratically knowing that something is off balance - this will surely be the sign to look for in the future when he may have another grand mal seizure. I've opted not to medicate him with phenobarb until I see a consistent pattern with this; if this is the only incident, I'd hate to have him on a harsh medication that could impair his lungs and liver (just a tad, but still...) I'm SO glad to have this figured out, but still a bit wary.
Your description almost sounds like a petite seizure (instead of a grand mal). It's probably best to go ahead and get him checked out at the veterinarian's office. I have found that keeping my cell phone handy (or a video camera) is helpful for when these events occur. That way, the doctor can actually see the shaking behavior along with your description. Good luck!
Seizures take many different forms, ranging from full blown (grand mal) to almost unnoticeable dizziness (petit mal). The fact that it has happened repeatedly, even weeks apart, suggests the start of something. Nocturnal seizures are also very common and far more common than when a dog is awake.
His recovery has been better than expected but on Sunday night he had a grand mal seizure. Trip to the emergency vet resulted in more blood tests but no results. Then on Monday he had another one. The vet put him on Phenobarbital and thankfully, no more seizures but the side affects of the drug mimic his brain tumor symptoms which has been scary to say the least.
The sleeping the next day thing is very common following an epileptic seizure. Not all dogs do this, but it depends on the severity of the seizure. In humans, a bad headache usually follows the seizure the next day, and they're just wiped out from the muscle tension during the seizure and very, very sleepy. The circling while she's chasing her tail is a classic doggie OCD. This makes me think that the licking probably is as well.
Seizure activity comes in many forms. Most epileptic dogs suffer grand mal seizures, where they drop to the floor and convulse, paddling with their legs as though they are running, for about 30 seconds (although for the anguished owner watching the seizure, it seems like an hour). Petite mal seizures, however, come in all shapes and sizes, and can be anything from the dog simply zoning out and staring blankly for a time, to the head nodding that you describe.
5 months now and thank goodness her seizures have stopped. She was having grand mal seizures every other day after some time...they just kept getting closer together. I do see that she is more hungry than normal but one thing that is differant from what I am seeing in the other posts is that she is actually getting up earlier and earlier every morning? I am trying to put her to bed later but when she normally would get up at 6:30, became 6:00 and now 5:00 am.
It was a grand mal seizure and I knew he was almost gone. The doctor came out and told me that she gave him valium but when he first got there they couldn't get a reading on his vital signs. I was told that it would be over two hours before they would know if he would come out of it or not and if he did she couldn't promise me a good prognosis. I asked her if I should have him put down and the doctor told me that if I did she didn't think I was a bad person.
My dog is larger -- Anatolian Shepherd mix, 9 years old -- and he is having one heck of a time with what I'm hoping is the Phenobarbital as well. He has been in perfect health but just out of the blue had a grand mal seizure. I took him to the veterinary hospital as it was in the evening and he had two more there. Within 24 hours they got me in to see a neurologist and now he's being treated for a bad case of Valley Fever.
I mean, if they aren't happening all that often, then I wouldn't get too concerned. Now, if she went into convulsions, that's like a grand mal seizure, and that would be something to be concerned about. Akira gets something that might be petite mal. I'm just not sure if that's what it is. But, even her vet thought it could be. And, she said that since it doesn't happen too often or too much that it's one of those things that's best left alone.
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