Fosamax and bone fractures

Common Questions and Answers about Fosamax and bone fractures

fosamax

I would not take Fosamax unless you have severe osteoporosis and there is no other way to impede bone loss. These drugs do not build bone but rather interrupt the natural bone rebuilding process (osteoclasts & osteoblasts) These drugs add a sheath or layer of hardening substance to the bone that impedes "loss" of bone density. However, in the process, it stops the bones ability to absorb calcium. There are new studies that show the risks of bisphosphonate drugs.
Fosamax has been linked in long-term users to the development of low-impact femoral fractures. In the event of a fracture fosamax may interfere with remodeling and healing. However, the decision to continue or quit would need to be taken by his treating doctor; keeping in view the initial condition for which it was advised and the risks Vs benefits. You may like to discus in detail with his treating doctor. Hope this is helpful. Take care!
I won't take that class of drugs and now there are warnings on Fosamax causing bone fractures. Ambulance chasers already out there. My neighbor takes the other drug with no problem. My enodcronologist has me on Vit D for my Osteo and I have noticed a difference.
In a 3-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 5,091 women with osteoporosis, use of strontium at a dose of 2 grams daily significantly improved bone density and reduced incidence of all fractures as compared to placebo.
The rest of the Fosamax stays in the body's skeleton for at least a decade and probably much longer. The body naturally works to take away OLD bone and replace it with NEW bone. Fosamax works to strenghthen OLD bone while interfering with the making and REPLACING of NEW bone. This OLD bone remains OLD and becomes fragile and brittle, hence broken femurs, hip bones, necrosis of the jaw, etc., etc.
These medications have been shown to increase bone mass, prevent bone loss, and to decrease the incidence of bone fractures. Fosamax and Actonal have the advantage of a once-a-week administration, as opposed to the alternative of daily administration. Biphosphonates should be taken on an empty stomach, along with at least 8 ounces of water. The patient should swallow the tablet while in an upright position and not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this drug.
He suggested I continue with Arimidex and Fosamax to prevent further bone loss, but I cannot stand the pain and disturbance to my sleep. Does anyone have any experience of stopping Arimidex and getting a different med that does not have the side effect of bone pain? I had two fractures in both feet last year and am concerned about osteoporosis (I am considered osteopenic at present) and particularly a hip fracture, so do want to continue with the Fosamax if possible.
The compression fracture may not heal entirely, but there are medications to prevent additional compression fractures from occurring. These include Fosamax and other new drugs which have been shown to prevent additonal damage to the bones. The osteophyte condition you mention is more likely due to "wear and tear" of the vertebral disc space and dessication (drying out of the disc) which causes loss of disc space and narrowing of the spinal canal.
Bone mass is greatest in women's 20s and 30s; it stabilizes between 30 and 40, and over 40 there is slow loss of bone strength. After menopause, there is a five- to seven-year period of accelerated bone loss; then the rate slows and returns to an age-related rate. The aging process has a greater effect on bone loss than the presence or absence of estrogen.
Among them are some 500,000 vertebral or spine fractures, 250,000 hip fractures, and 240,000 wrist fractures. The numbers are different in different countries: reported incidences of hip fractures are highest in the US and Northern Europe; intermediate in Mediterranean and Asian countries, and lowest in South Africa, particularly in the areas where people follow traditional ways of life. There are more fractures among city dwellers than among country folk.
I also do upper body strength training and walk a lot. (and I eat and drink tons of yogurt, take calcium, etc.) In the 8 years I've been treating I have completely reversed the situation, and moved from osteoporosis to osteopaenia to green on the dexxa scan in some sections of my spine and hips.
These drugs were thought to be useful because the Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT) with Osteoporotic women who already had fractures showed increased bone density on DEXA Scan and decreased fracture rate over the four years on the drug. However, these drugs kill bone cells called osteoclasts and cause a dramatic reduction in bone formation which some researchers think will eventually lead to weak bones which fracture more easily. In support of this cautionary note, Dr.
The goal of osteoporosis treatment is the prevention of bone fractures by stopping bone loss and by increasing bone density and strength. Although early detection and timely treatment of osteoporosis can substantially decrease the risk of future fracture, none of the available treatments for osteoporosis are complete cures. Therefore, prevention of osteoporosis is as important as treatment.
now i have an infection from 2 bad teeth and need 2 extractions. but i haven't taken fosamax for 1 1/2 months. i have an antibiotic but i need the extractions what would be advised?
I do want to caution your use of the Fosamax though. New studies have shown issues with femur bone fractures (brittle bone) and esophagal problems. There are other ways to strengthen bones naturally without taking biphosphonates. I'd get your vitamin D & calcium levels checked too since an underactive thryoid can cause problems with metabolism/regeneration of bone (so can too much thryoid hormone!) That is what makes Hashis difficult to deal with due to the hyper/hypo rollercoaster.
Your doctor will help you understand the results. T score between -1 and -2.5 indicates the beginning of bone loss (osteopenia). T score below -2.5 indicates osteoporosis. For consistency, before comparing results try to use the same bone density equipment, the same skeletal measures and even the same technician if possible, Ask your doctor for guidance. Then you can readily compare current to previous bone density test results. I hope this helps.
The interference with the osteoclast function decreases the rate of bone reabsorption and indirectly helps to increase the strength of the bone. Both alendronic acid and zoledronic acid have been FDA approved for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Zoledronic acid is currently being studied for the prevention of bone loss associated with aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer.
There are other causes of bone pain and in your case, it may be due to bone loss. You are predisposed to thinning of bones (osteoporosis) as a side effect of androgen deprivation. Back aches may also be due to age-related degenerative changes, such as arthritis on the back. Stay positive, and discuss things with your doctor.
Hello Emanuelle, I definitely feel for your concern. Although I am 36 I have pretty severe osteoporosis and at one time was recommended to take medication for it. I have several spinal injuries which have resulted in Degenerative Disk Disease, other joint syndromes and overall bone density loss. I had not personally heard of the the fractures (femur) from the Fosamax, but I did hear of the other risk factors for some of the older drugs.
She is on 150mg of time-released morphine a day, and ora-morph and oxycodone for pain spikes and breakthrough pain. She is still crying and screaming much of the time for the pain. Her heart beats so rapidly at such times that it does not complete each beat and her blood pressure drops (tachycardia)--making her look over medicated due to lack of O2 to her brain, when in fact just the opposite is true with regard to the pain medication.
Studies have yielded conflicting results about their use, with some observational studies suggesting that high calcium intake is protective against vascular disease, and others showing that calcium supplements speed vascular calcification and increase mortality in patients with kidney failure and increase cardiovascular events and MI in women.
When I ran cross-country in high school and college (7 and 6 years ago, respectively), I experienced 2 metatarsal stress fractures (one in each foot, subsequent years) and had low bone density (osteopenia) as a result of an eating disorder. I had been on fosamax for awhile, take calcium, and my weight is back to normal, so supposedly my bone density is fine now. I was also not running like I had in the past, but took regular walks and we blamed the pain on worn out tennis shoes.
dental work - there are blackbox warnings about osteonecrosis of the jaw (bone death) The mother of a woman that I worked with took Fosamax for a few months and her teeth began to loosen - an oral surgeon had to pull teeth from a quadrant of her mouth and add some sort of bone replacement. The oral surgeon who did my root canal 2 years ago told me (reluctantly) agreed that the bone drugs are becoming controversial.
I have also read about back bone glue for osteoporitic fractures. They inject it, and it stabalizes the fracture. No movement, no pain. There are tons of treatments for osteoporosis. At 26, with proper treatment, you can be good as new. I am just waiting for the drug that builds cartilage - then I can regrow my joints. Osteoporosis they have licked. This treatment will require more than just the PT professionals.
She is on 150mg of time-released morphine a day, and ora-morph and oxycodone for pain spikes and breakthrough pain. She is still crying and screaming much of the time for the pain. Her heart beats so rapidly at such times that it does not complete each beat and her blood pressure drops (tachycardia)--making her look over medicated due to lack of O2 to her brain, when in fact just the opposite is true with regard to the pain medication.
pretty well, but since you also suffer from osteoporosis and arthritis, you have the added risk that the bone will not support enough strength over time and you will get worse as your bones weaken or if you begin having spinal fractures. Worse case scenario would put you in a wheelchair and you would have constant pain that would need to be dealt with. Right now you say you are doing well and you are pretty much pain free. Know that over time your spine will get worse, not better.
I don't take any meds as all they do is slow down the osteoclast activity and allow old bone to remain longer than it should. It is better to try supplements and exercise that promote bone growth (osteoblast activity) first.
When I ran cross-country in high school and college (7 and 6 years ago, respectively), I experienced 2 metatarsal stress fractures (one in each foot, subsequent years) and had low bone density (osteopenia) as a result of an eating disorder. I had been on fosamax for awhile, take calcium, and my weight is back to normal, so supposedly my bone density is fine now. I was also not running like I had in the past, but took regular walks and we blamed the pain on worn out tennis shoes.
Increases flexibility and bone strength. It has increase bone density from 6-8% in 4 1/2 mos., varying for individuals. Motivation and self-actualization were strengthened". Her website is: aromahealthtexas dot com. Also, taking glucosamine, MSM and vit. D are good. I'm waiting for synthetic chondroitin to be available because I can't take the fish ones.
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