Dog stroke symptoms vet

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stroke

Am seeing a vet later today but kind of anxious so i wanted a professional opinion now. Took my dog for a 1 hr walk 3 days ago, it was hot and humid, but breezy; and the conditions that were not unbearble to two unfit adult humans. Other than the normal panting when we re-entered our AC cooled home, everything seemed normal, physically and behaviour. However about 24 hrs later the dog was acting strange, almost as if spaced out, always looking up.
If your dog is twitching on the floor or has fallen unconscious, the probability of a stroke is very high. In this case you must rush your dog to your vet as soon as you possibly can. Often stroke symptoms in dogs cannot be identified, unless it's been a slow and steady process. Some of the signs to keep a check on your pet are losing control over bladder and bowel movement, losing balance, sudden blindness, not responding as usual and seizure of twitching of the body.
You need to get your dog to a vet and the sooner the better. These kinds of sudden neurological symptoms can be very serious, so please don't wait! It could be anything from a stroke to a brain tumor or some kind of toxin (poisoning) from food or plants. In other words, it could be something life threatening. I hope you can post back and let us know how he does and what your vet has to say.
Ria is a 10 yr old greyhound. About two months ago, she started crying out when she would stand up. The vet took several xrays and said there was nothing they could find, other than she was constipated ( she pooed regulary) and that her abdomen was tender which they attributed to her "being constipated". A month later she began having severe diarrhea (watery, no substance). At first I thought it might be just a stomach thing as my other grey and my beagle showed no symptoms.
Welcome...This doesn't sound like a true stroke to me.....It's a CLASSIC example of "Vestibular Disease"....Also, called "Old Dog Disease"....You can google it.....Normally, symptoms are treated with mainly "Nausea Medications" while it runs it's relatively short course....Usually takes two weeks.....SEVERE nausea is the main problem...Alot like Vertigo in humans.....Everything is spinning, don't know up or down which causes the nausea.....I'm unsure about the Pred.
You really need to get your pet into a vet for examination, better to be safe than sorry, and better to catch whatever the issue is than wait until worsen, for it will get more expensive financially... Could have been heat stroke, symptoms of Cushings, etc???? Until your vet visit, start giving Rice water and alternate w/mild flavor gatorade (no red), if pet will not drink this on his own, syringe...
Anytime a dog is acting like he's had a stroke, do not waste time looking for answers on the internet. Get him to a vet fast. Let us know how he is if you can.
You said you weren't there for the euthanization but touched the dog's eye to see if she was dead? If you had the vet euthanize your dog the drug would have stopped the dog's heartbeat instantly. The vet verifies the death by checking for a heartbeat with a stethascope. Rest assured, they would not have cremated your dog without full knowledge of the dog's death. There has to be no heartbeat. I hope this helps a little. Please don't worry and fret over this. Your dog is at peace now.
These dogs exhibit high rectal temperatures and need to be cooled quickly in a tub of cool water, making sure the dog gets wet near the belly and inside of legs. Dogs with heat stroke should be seen by their vet promptly. Fever Because fever causes elevated temperatures, a dog may pant because it is over heating. Dogs have a fever when a rectal temperature of over 102.5 degrees is recorded.
I just lost my dear pet from what the vet claims as a blood clot probably in her brain- but from what I know, it was probably from a stroke. Others vets and internal vet doctors suggest that if you think your dog has a blood clot, do not massage the area as the clot may travel to different areas of their body. I hope your dog is okay.
Of course, the only way to tell for sure what it is that is causing the symptoms is to take your dog to the vet for an examination.
He has the same symptoms as OzarkMark's post. My dog is back at the vet er for observation. He has been given mannitol to reduce the brain swelling, and cerenia for severe nausea. I hope he makes a full recovery to, as this was a freak accident! He is my son's dog. My son is 10, and I don't want him to be sad. Max is weak, and walks but collapses after a bit. He will potty on his own, but his walk is unbalanced. Prayers for all of us.
I believe the disease that Ghilly is referring to is "Canine Vestibular Disease". Also, called "Old Dog Vestibular Disease". Another of the symptoms is motion sickness. It is considered to be like Vertigo in humans. This alone can cause nausea and thus not wanting to eat. The condition improves on it's own from a few days to a couple of weeks. Good luck to you both and please let us know how things are going....
She is full of energy, bowells seem fine for the most part, she is eating the LD dog food just fine....... Not all dogs with these symptoms of course will have the same root cause but it's worth a shot.....
She was fine before we went outside. I haven't noticed any other problems in the past. My vet thought she may have had a heat stroke. Would anyone know of anything else that may have happened to her?
But I always treat my dog first...then him. I show them affection, and again, stroke her first, then him. He accepts this happily, and I can tell my girl kind of needs that so the "Pack order" stays on equilibrium. A friend once came and did it the other way round, and you should have seen Misty's face! She looked quite disturbed about this change of order! I could tell immediately it caused her slight anxiety.
There could be a dozen reasons you dog passed-on, but hard lesson learned. Dogs are smart and my dog Jack had sickness from about the first day we saved him. He would have good days and bad, but learning after he died he had liver problem that could not been fixed or operated to repair did not relieve the hurt and guilt. You will feel all these and that is normal. I know you cared deeply for your Macy and I'm sure she did you. I'm so sorry you lost her at young age of 7.
I have to have her on special prescription dog food due to kidney stones so don't have a lot of options. I talked to the vet and got the same prescription dog food only in canned. The first couple of days she ate this good and did not throw up as long as I kept the portions down to a couple of tablespoons. Now the last 2 days she is not even eating this. I have tried crumbling a couple of potatoe chips (her favorite) and mixing this in with no luck. she still does not eat.
Circling behavior, balance problems, falling down, nausea and vomiting may also occur with vestibular disease. Your dog could have either type. Since you are unable to go to the vet you can treat symptoms with low dose aspirin 81 mg twice daily, Dramamine if your dog has nausea and vomiting at 1/2 the human dose. Unfortunately, there is also the possibility of a cancer in the brain or spinal cord in a dog of 15 years.
You can also discuss Vestibular Disease /syndrome with your vet in further detail. What did your Vet tell you was wrong with your dog....? I hope that your dog will be feeling better soon. Best wishes to you both....
The causes that lead to your pet's death can be multiple. What you describe seems to me (I am not a vet!) a stroke and it can happen all the time. Especially in elderly dogs. You said it was a stray dog so you do not know about his past and maybe he had seizures befor but you do not know... You could ask the vet to make an autopsy so you an find out the reason why Caesar died.
i took my dog to the vet sunday for a rash on his head. he was started on prednisone and amoxicillin. on wednesday, we were all sitting outside and he was running around playing. his head was healing nicely. he ran about 30 feet, turned around and ran back to my son. he stopped and walked a couple of steps to get his ball which was under my son's foot. he turned and stumbled a couple of steps and hit his head on the cement.
I am so sorry about what happened, and it was such a shock to you too. Sometimes when a dog appears mildly sick, we cannot know that something else is going on. Very often a dog will get an upset stomach, vomit, and then be absolutely fine afterwards. I can be very hard to tell. Did he, do you think -eat anything from the trash? Even something which might have appeared harmless? When he vomited -what came up?
Certainly, if the symptoms persist over the next 48 hours, she will need a vet as a matter of some urgency, otherwise she could end up causing even more damage than she has already suffered. Eating grass is a sign that a dog has a digestive problem and wants to be sick. Is there anything in the back yard that she has been chewing on or something she has been eating that she shouldn't? While she feels sickly, she certainly won't eat properly, so this is a priority.
By Monday AM (within 36 hours) he was lying on the floor unable to move and with breathing difficulty. I brought him to the vet a they said it probably was a stroke. The whole weekend he was having siezures he still would obey commands and ate and drank as he normally did. Do the symtoms indicate possible rabies exposure? Last Vacc. was 2.5 yrs, no indic. of being bitten by other animal. Should we be concerned with those who played with him that weekend? Thank You.
She couldnt stand and was in real discomfort, her eyes moving very fast from side to side.After ringing vet after vet i got in touch with some one 45mins away and was told to take her to the Animal Hospital. When i arrived and the vet done several checks she told me it was not good news and the best option was to have her put to sleep. I questioned the vet as to what may have happened but could not get a specific answer, she told me there was no other option.
I don't have any knowledge of what could have happened to your dog, but would like to say I'm sorry to hear of her death. My dog is also twelve, and at the vet last week I read on a chart that she is beyond being a senior, she is in the geriatric stage, which yours would have been too. Its hard to believe their that old, you can at the very least be comforted that she didn't have a disease that you would have to watch her suffer with, or have to euthanize her.
He was rather depressed in the last few weeks though he enjoyed his walks, he sometimes yelped with the slightest stroke on his back on and off and the vet couldn't find anything wrong and gave him some painkiller. The painkiller seemed to perk him up somehow but 2 days ago he was depressed again (not playing much but still eating) and the vet found him with a fever and gave him some anti-inflammatory drugs.
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