Deviated septum surgery problems

Common Questions and Answers about Deviated septum surgery problems

deviated-septum

My son, 28 years, has deviated septum. He has no problem with breathing in the daytime. When lying down, he may breathe partially through mouth.One ENT doctor says he must undergo surgery. Another one says he may have surgery when he faces problems, say, sinusitis etc. I am confused. How can I take a decision in this? Anybody could help?
It is likely that, with the improved sinus drainage resultant from correction of your deviated septum, you will have relief from some of your current problems including chronic sinus infections. However, surgical correction of a deviated septum may have little or no effect on sore throat and excessive post-nasal drip, if chronic inflammation of your nose is not also treated.
Hello, I wanted to know the risksof having a deviated septum fixed. I had this problem for over 10 years and it seems to keep coming back. I had it fix twice before. I am noticing that the cartilage in my nose seems less so I am concerned. I don't want to have to keep getting surgery to correct my deviated septum. Is there any other options (besides nose sprays)?
So I went to the ENT today and had them stick that scope up my nose and apparently I have a pretty bad deviated septum ... he gave me a script for a nasal spray and an antibiotic but I'm not sure what the antibiotic is for, I don't like taking antibiotics if I don't have to so I'm hesitant to take that. He mentioned surgery but for the possible future ... I'm hoping the nasal spray will help the allergies and the post nasal drip ...
Don't worry. The majority of all noses are slightly assymetrical and deviated. In fact, even surgery to correct severe deviations usually leave a bit of crookedness. A perfectly straight septum is rare. Deviation is not necessary the result of trauma. It just is what it is. The majority of noses develop screwy one way or another. You won't necessarily have problems down the road. As I said, this is so common it may never effect your breathing.
I remember that someone had posted that thu had surgery for a deviated septum. My DH is scheduled for this surgery in Monday, 10/1, and I am wondering what to expect as far as recovery. I've heard up to a week of not doing anything then I have heard within a day r two u r fine. My ex husband had this surgery done but also had more stuff done (his sinuses were punctured and drained because they were so filled) and I was thinking he was back to work (he was a truck driver) in like 3 days...
I haven't experienced much relief yet, but it's only been 8 days so far. They only way to fix a deviated septum is surgery. Without the surgery it can cause a lot of sleep problems, sleep apnea, disturbed sleep patterns, dry mouth. Lots of complicated problems. I'm still swollen up at this point. I use the Nasal Rinse 6 times a day. am taking antibiotics, steroids, which are awful, and steroid nose drops, as well as Vicodin for pain.
There is absolutely no evidence that a deviated septum leads to oxygenation problems and problems with the heart and lungs. The only reasons to fix your deviated septum would be 1) you are finding it difficult to breathe through your nose 2) you have sleep apnea and fixing your septum may help with CPAP compliance 3) you are having severe, difficult to treat nosebleeds 4) you are looking for cosmetic rhinoplasty (of which a septoplasty may be a part).
which coincidentally has been a genetic thing in my family.....so is the deviated septum..... I have problems with fluid in my ears as well as what they say is neural hearing loss based on my hearing tests.. the fluid is impossible to get to drain out.... if anyone has had the septoplasty surgery vs rhinoplasty please respond.....
i had surgery a few weeks ago for deviated septum. Ever since the surgery my right eye has not been producing any tears. Is it related and how can i fix it? i've been to the eye doctor 3 times -- they say to put in lots of drops and ointment at night, but it doesn't seem to be getting better. What do you think?
, morning headaches, anxiety, heart palpitations, uncoordinated food swallow (randomly gasp for air for no reason), constant front head pain/pressure for 3 years,, i have a deviated septum and the ENT also said my nasal mucosa looked inflammed and red, it has always been like this since my head pain started, my nose feels constantly blocked and very DRY not runny.
Hello people, I've been under surgery 2 days ago, for my deviated septum. I had some problems with the tampons the day after, they had to remove them and put new ones. Now i'm back home, with some issues.. My nose is dripping, but i guess this is normal at first? Whenever i swallow i feel like my ears are getting clogged up all the time! Is such an annoying and scary feeling.. is this normal? I called my ENT but she wasn't there, so now i have to wait to speak to her..
I'm sort of leaning towards going for surgery, because the CT scan also showed that I have a deviated nasal septum that has been giving me a lot of breathing problems for a lot of my life (it was misdiagnosed as hay fever), that I would like to have fixed with another surgery - and the ENT specialist said that I can have the 2 surgeries together, which will save me some time and trouble.
Having sinus problem most of my life, it’s the last few years that have been the worse. I’m a 28 year old male with acute sinusitis and a deviated septum and my sinus cavities are packed with polyps. When I was younger I had an allergy test done, and I was allergic to a few things, 20 years later, same test I was so allergic to everything they put on me that they had to stop because I swelled up so much.
Hi SparkyIreland, I too have the same symptoms and my doctor suggested surgery to correct deviated septum. Did you have Deviated septum surgery?....If yes, how do you feel now. I mean did all your sysmptoms cleared.
I know surgery is an option for the deviated septum. But will my nose ever not hurt again??? It also causes so much pressure in my ears that it has aggravated my TMJ. Sure wish I knew then what I know now...
Hi, I mentioned this probably a couple of years ago now, and am only now getting around to dealing with it. I'm awating an appt for a CT scan to check out my deviated septum and find out whether surgery will correct it. I'm not so concerned about getting the procedure if it will help. Just wondering if any of you have had this done, how was the recovery and do you notice a big difference afterwords? Any bad experiences with this?
My husband had deviated septum surgery several years ago to help aleviate his severe headaches which are connected to his sinuses. It didn't help AT ALL. He still suffers terrible headaches and sinus pressure. We paid a lot of money only for him to be in a lot of pain for a few days and he also had a nasal hemmorage afterward which was pretty scary.
The nasal septum is a plate of bone and cartilage along the center of the nose. A deviated nasal septum is shifted to one side. When your septum is deviated there is less space on the side that the septum leans towards. Generally this area is squeezed. A deviated nasal septum may cause blockage of the sinuses on that side to the point that the sinuses do not drain as well. This can cause swelling of the nasal and sinus passages.
It's always better to try to treat breathing problems medically (like with an anti-allergy med) before attempting surgery, even for a deviated septum. I am exactly like you in that I have some swelling of one turbinate in one nostril, but practically no allergies (during the tests I had miniscule reactions to dust and dust mights but NO seasonal allergies) which I knew even going into the tests, but the doctor really needs to get a completely clear picture.
A related discussion, <a href='/posts/show/756529'>Husband has deviated septum, needs surgery, but ekg came back abnormal </a> was started.
For 8 months now I have put it down to sinus problems (my mum has suffered for decades) However after a recent CT scan, my sinuses were ok but I have a mild deviated septum, which my e.n.t says I need surgery for. .Can a mild deviated septum cause all of these symptoms or is it possible that a CT scan wouldn't have shown the full extent of the deviated septum(my nostrils always seem blocked)???
What's the recovery time for surgery to remove polyps and repair a deviated septum? How long will I be in misery, and how long before I can work. (I'm a computer tech)? How long before I'll be glad that I had it done instead of sorry?
He took a look at my nose and recommended surgery for a deviated septum and enlarged turbinates. Is there an expert here that can look at my picture and recommend whether they think I should have the surgery? I just want a second opinion before I commit to something like this. Thanks!!!
He made me undergo a CT Scan and results showed that all my sinuses are normal except that I have enlarged turbinates and deviated septum that cause my chronic stuffy nose. He prescribed me another nasal spray and anti allergy pill that he said might work. Surgery too, he said might be a solution. I want to know if surgery is the best solution for me or if possible can surgery still wait until december of this year because I'm planning to do it on December when I return to Philippines.
Allergic Rhinitis, Congested Turbinates, Deviated Septum. He said that because of the allergies, everything is swollen and that is why i'm experiencing these symptoms. He said to try a steroid nasal spray for 2 months twice a day which I have a prescription for, and also a Nasal oil. He said if it doesn't improve after 2 months that I can look into having surgery that will give me relief. My question is regarding this steroid treatments.
Hi, its not related, the deviated septum and the periodic limb movement disorder, but both can cause problems with sleep. Your symptoms of moving your legs in sleep could be due to a sleep disorder called Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD). They disrupt sleep and cause involuntary movements during sleep. The cause is not known. They can be diagnosed with a sleep study and medications help to control them and you can sleep well. Regards.
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