Ct angiography of neck

Common Questions and Answers about Ct angiography of neck

angiogram

Does a CAT scan detet aballoned artery in yor brain or is a MRI bette for that, becaue I have een having pain n the left side of my head all the way down to my neck.
Ultrasound did not show blockages in my neck and I passed the stress test. A couple weeks ago I received the results of CT angiography and was told that things looked good. Today I picked up a CD copy of the CT scan so that I can have it on file. The images that show the arteries illuminated with the dye was pretty wild since you can see everything in 3D. BUT there is a portion of the bracheocephalic artery totally missing from the images that show the aortic arch.
A couple other things come to mind, aside from any brain problem that the second neuro may see on yoru scans, and that is if you tear up the spine in your neck somewhat, to where you have, say, a bulging disc or degenerative changes from aging, or even just wrenched the muscles all out of shape in a minor car accident, any of those things can give you a headache and make your neck sore.
If the neurologist and radiologist are suspecting a cerebral aneurysm, they can confirm with cerebral angiography and clipping of the aneurysm could be done. Hope this helps. Take care.
Factors that may cause this or contribute to its rupture are smoking, hypertension, head injury, family history of brain aneurysms. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here. Neurosurgery is the mainstay of treatment that may be suggested by a neurologist after examination. In addition, rehabilitation is the only effective way to help the patient regain function to the possible extent and prevent from permanent losses.
What about an MRI of neck and spine to look for nerve encroachment or any spinal cord injury? Did she suffer any whiplash? Did she hit her head on the steering wheel or windshield in the accident? Did they rule out concussion? Did they also look at the CAT SCAN for subarachnoid hemorrhage, which can be caused by motor vehicle accident (came up on symptom checker on this site)? (Although they say blood would be found in spinal tap, checked if the CT was normal.
So a ct scan could not tell if i had one?
I am a Multiple Sclerosis patient who had to have a CT Angiography because my last MRI suggested Vertebro Basilar Insufficiency. I go back to the Neurologist on Tuesday so I haven't found out anything concrete about the test. I do have a written dictation of the test and it showed that I have shotty lymph nodes bilaterally in my neck. 3 years ago, the Radiologist found an enlarged lymph node in my armpit. I do have episodes of sweating but I can't say that I have night sweats.
If the neurologist and radiologist are suspecting a cerebral aneurysm, they can confirm with cerebral angiography and clipping of the aneurysm could be done. This appears to be due to sinus inflammation through an infection due to postural variation of head, may be accompanied with fever and diagnosed by MRI or CT SCAN. Hope this helps. Take care.
Common symptoms after stroke could be unconsciousness, loss of vision, headache, eye and neck pain, seizures, paralysis, gait disturbances etc. It needs some days to recover completely as it depends upon severity also. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here. Neurosurgery is the mainstay of treatment that may be suggested by a neurologist after examination. Hope this information proves helpful to you.
It's a migraine like pain behind my left ear starting towards the bottom of the left side of my neck and running to the too of my head. It doesn't stretch all the way over my head , it stops just above where my ear stops. I think I should add though that I seem to only get this pain for a couple weeks after I've taken ecstasy. I've taken quite a bit in the last five years but only started getting the pain about a year ago.
No It is not a useful test for looking at the caliber of the artery to assess for risk of stroke or forming a blood clot. CT angiography or cerebral angiography would be better tests for this problem" Elleon--- The issue is if you had 'lesions' in your brain. Substitute the word(s) 1. White matter hyperintensitives 2. UBO (Another 'cute' word used for lesions---- Unidentified Bright Objects) 3. Demyelinated areas They all mean the same. I have lesions on my brain.
I am taking Ecosprin AV 75 mg for mild ectesia reported in CT angiography (heart) report. Mainly I face the problem of feeling of imbalance and left leg involuntary movement. I don't have any type of stress or tension. No family problem, No financial problem, nothing at all. From last 2 days Doctor stopped ZAPTRA 25 and now prescribed plain Clonazepam 0.25mg at night and Franxit in the morning. (Once in a day only).
What kind of "bloodwork" was done exactly? What was the MRI and CT of? I am assuming only of the head. No MRI/CT of the neck?
Factors that may cause this or contribute to its rupture are smoking, hypertension, head injury, family history of brain aneurysms (so sisters may have). Common symptoms could be loss of vision, headache, eye and neck pain, seizures, paralysis, gait disturbances etc. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here. Neurosurgery is the mainstay of treatment that may be suggested by a neurologist after examination.
That night, experienced mild numbing in arm (top of forearm) and right side of face (cheek area). I went to ER, blood tests and CT scan were normal. Headache remained mild, off and on, mild neck soreness remained. Went to see a D.O. and he scheduled an MRI. MRI was normal. Throughout all of this, the constants have been mild neck soreness, very mild occasional dizziness, mild headaches (mainly in the back of the head) and the numbness/tingling in forearm and right side of face.
In the few cases that are not recognized by CT, the healthcare provider may consider performing a lumbar puncture (LP, or spinal tap) to identify blood in the cerebrospinal fluid that runs in the subarachnoid space. If the CT or the LP reveals the presence of blood, angiography is performed to identify where the aneurysm is located and to plan treatment.
What are some common uses of the procedure?
Signs of unruptured aneurysm include headaches, double vision, loss of vision, eye and neck pain, warning headaches caused by leakage of blood into the brain prior to its rupture. Symptoms of a ruptured aneurysm are sudden severe headache, lethargy, confusion and stupor, seizures, sudden mood swings, dysarthria, ptosis, movement disorders like ataxia and even death. You need to consult a neurologist immediately for an emergency evaluation with angiography, MRI, CT and CSF analysis.
Your doctor may diagnose a TIA based just on the medical history of the event rather than on anything found during a general physical and neurological examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning. CT scanning of your head uses X-ray beams to assemble a composite, three-dimensional look at your brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This procedure, which uses a strong magnetic field, can generate a composite, three-dimensional view of your brain.
Common symptoms could be loss of vision, headache, eye and neck pain, seizures, paralysis, gait disturbances etc. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here. Neurosurgery is the mainstay of treatment that may be suggested by a neurologist after examination. Hope this information proves helpful to you.
Hello, My wife, 33 years and in Dec 2009 diagnosed as Right Temporal Lobe Hematoma 2.3 x 2.5 x 2.1 cm (CC x TS x AP) with CT Scan, MRI and Angiography. Prior this, she has symptoms as such: - Intense Headache and dizziness - Feel want to faint, and nausea, drowsy, - Feel like a sense of "deja vu" (already seen) - Smell something like alkohol Surgery done in end Dec 2009, successfully to remove some part of blood clot.
Factors that may cause this or contribute to its rupture are smoking, hypertension, head injury, family history of brain aneurysms (so sisters may have). Common symptoms could be loss of vision, migrainous like headache, eye and neck pain, seizures, paralysis, gait disturbances etc. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here.
If the neurologist and radiologist are suspecting a cerebral aneurysm, they can confirm with cerebral angiography and clipping of the aneurysm could be done. Hope this helps. Take care.
You might want to ask your doctors if the protocol, 64 slice vs 10 and 16 slice protocols, used for your heart CT angiography (CTA) has any degree of false negatives for the diagnosis of dissecting aortic aneurysm or any other intra-thoracic large blood vessel disease. Atypical chest pain can also be caused by diseases of the spine and esophagus. Ask if these have been ruled out. Ask further if the pain could be a sign of disease of the small coronary artery vasculature.
Wondering if the arteries in the back of the neck are still crimped? I get a sensation at the base of my skull as if someone were sucking through a closed straw accompanied by severe dizziness. Not imagining this. What test or tests would conclusively diagnose minor or major blockages and is such a blockage possible? Don't want to traipse from MD to MD searching for an answer if this is a serious problem. Don't want to wait until stroke to know I wasn't kidding about the dizziness.
MRI of head/neck shows 70% occlusion right internal carotid. SPEC scan normal. CT angiography show stenosis. So, here's the question. Can the level of fatigue I am experiencing be due to the carotid stenosis and yet not show any brain dysfunction on the MRI, CT or SPEC scan?
If the neurologist and radiologist are suspecting a cerebral aneurysm, they can confirm with cerebral angiography and clipping of the aneurysm could be done. Hope this helps. Take care.
MRA vs CTA My doct has ordered a repeat of the MRA of the brain and neck that I had 6 months ago, but this time with contrast (as opposed to non-contrast before).
MRI of head/neck shows 70% occlusion right internal carotid. SPEC scan normal. CT angiography show stenosis. So, here's the question. Can the level of fatigue I am experiencing be due to the carotid stenosis and yet not show any brain dysfunction on the MRI, CT or SPEC scan?
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