Cpap oxygen levels

Common Questions and Answers about Cpap oxygen levels

cpap

Will low blood oxygen levels make blood pressure go up? If I walk for 15 minutes at medium speed and then rest for a while my B.P. reading has been as low as 117/ 76 . Yesturday at my physical my resting bp rate without prior walking was 138/90. Blew the physical .Should be 80 or less. Whats the matter. Im on bp pills and am reducing and on low sodium eating plan .
You need to go ahead and do it your oxygen level is falling way to low, It will probably be something you will do the rest of your life unless they find a underlying problem. If you dont do nothing may happen but your oxygen levels can get low enough you could pass out, you could have a seizure , I did, or even worse.
I was just told I have low oxygen levels 55% of the night. They recomend I sleep with Oxygen at night. I was just wondering if there is anything I can do for myself to avoid the oxygen?
While out of town for a month though, I ended up back in the ER and since my oxygen levels were low, I was questioned why I wasn't on oxygen or at least have it added to my Cpap at night? Pulmonary Hypertension was believed to be the problem so I went to see the top Pulmonary Hypertension Specialist at The University of Kansas in Kansas City. After a heart cath 1 week ago today, I found out that I have Distolic Heart Failure as well as PH.
I would think that he would easily qualify for home O2 with oxygen levels like that. He will feel much better once his oxygen levels are brought up. It literally is like night and day. I used to be on O2, I was very resistant to the idea of wearing the cannula out in public and will admit that I didn't wear it when I should initially. I suffered the consequences of not wearing the O2, feeling "fuzzy" mentally, tiring much easier, being very short of breath etc...
The formal sleep study showed obstructive sleep apnea with oxygen levels as low as 70. I am quite sure now that this was causing my exercise indused PH and d/t being able to treat the sleep apnea will be able to reverse the PH if not already so it was well worth the difficulties and frustrations in pursuing what was going on with the original test that showed triscupid regurgitation with increase pulmonary pressures. The scary thing is that if I had not pushed to see a pulmonary spec.
James, How was your O2 while on CPAP, hopefully better than that 66%. I know with the CPAP mine o2 levels were good enough...I cannot remember all my sleep stage percentages but I do know I RARELY dream and that showed with the low time percentage. I didn't remember tape on my eye libs but wasn't too thrilled with all the wires all over either so I may have overlooked that.
In the past, he has used oxygen to assist with the low levels in addition to the cpap. I noticed his leg/back pain was less while using oxygen. We have recently moved from McAllen TX to Wichita KS. He has stopped using the oxygen and the pain has returned with a vengence not only in his legs/back, but his entire body hurts. Is there any medical support that the use of oxygen helps to reduce pain?
Hello, I was diagnosed with low oxygen levels while sleeping. I would like to know what are the risks do this, and what i can do to prevent any further complications.
probably in the form of a BiPAP especially if his CO2 levels are elevated from central apnea ( BiPAP is almost like CPAP continuous positive airway pressure- this machine blows a continous pressure that is prescribed by the doctor, it keeps the airways open except that BiPAP has two pressures instead of one, a higher one that is triggered when you breathe in and one lower pressure for when you exhale...
it was determined that my oxygen was in the 85 % range....my question is...what would be better for me to use...a cpap machine or use oxygen...what is the difference & which one would actually give me a better chance of sleeping better. This discussion is related to low oxygen level while sleeping.
my mom has 85% and up on her oxygen level when she sleep and she has asthma is that a normal?
What did your doc say about the test? Are they testing your oxygen levels at sleep, rest or during exercise? Let me know and I will do my best to help you out as far as description and what to expect. I have been a pretty good guinea pig LOL!
her blood gasses were all over the place, with very high carbon dioxide levels. Any information you can provide on CPAP weaning would be most appreciated. Thank you.
Gee, Dave, this is a problem! Sleep apnea would cause lower oxygen levels, which in themselves CAUSE PVC's. And lack of sleep certainly does trigger more PVC's. There must be something else going on, so I would call my my sleep doc if I were you or at least my PCP asap. Btw, a low TSH means the thyroid is too active. An underactive thyroid causes the TSH to rise. In any event, you still have to sleep with the CPAP on. Have you checked to make sure everything is hooked up correctly?
My first CPAP machine did not resolve my symptoms and I was switched to a Respironics Auto SV BiPAP machine w/ two liters of oxygen about four months ago. I had an overnight pulse oxygen test last week. The results show that I had two periods between 30 and 45 minutes where my blood oxygen level fell into the low 80s and even the upper 70s. Is an hour to hour and a half of low blood oxygen a problem? What are the possible effects? And, could it explain why I am still tired.
I have emphysema, asthma, and chronic bronchitis (all that and I'm not a smoker, what are the chances?). During my sleep test my oxygen levels dropped to 76, I tried the C-PAC and only got aggravated allegies. Tomorrow I start with oxygen at night. How serious is 76% and how hopeful should I be that oxygen will work?
I currently have a friend who has Hypoxia, and has severe sleep apnea. She has a CPAP / with oxygen and her O2 levels are ridiculously low. Low 80's. She is obese and refuses to lose weight. She was taking opiates for months that ultimately caused her apnea.she is also averaging 58 apneas an hour. She woke the other night gasping for air. I have said to her so many times...execise, lose weight and eat better...this should make her start feeling better right??
Does he already have lung problems or was the doctor suspecting sleep apnea that could cause low oxygen levels? Anyhow, an oxygen level of 70 is low. Normal values are 95-100, those with chronic lung problems can run in the low 90's. Supplemental oxygen is prescribed when O2 is 88 or less (most insurances won't cover O2 unless a person is at 88 or less including Medicare).
Yes, her memory loss, depression and possibly also a steep decline in cognitive function is very likely on the basis of chronic oxygen deprivation when awake, and exaggerated oxygen deprivation during sleep. And, low oxygen levels can contribute significantly to heart failure and make it less responsive to therapy than it would otherwise be. What you describe suggests that she should definitely be using a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device for her sleep apnea.
The most common treatment and arguably the most consistently effective treatment for sleep apnea is the use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. In addition to CPAP, a dentist specializing in sleep disorders can prescribe Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT). It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided. For exact diagnosis, you are requested to consult your doctor.
So apparently that warranted for a CPAP mask and machine, which ironically, when turned up to higher levels, gave me complex sleep apnea. Not cool. So I went out and bought my own little pulse oxidizer that records your BPM and oxygen saturation, but my question is this: what is considered normal when you're sleeping? I've had a night where my O2 levels dropped twice--once to 75 and once to 85--but everything else was fine.
An oxygen saturation of 65 to 70 is abnormal under any circumstance; awake, asleep, resting or with exercise. The cause could be respiratory, such as obstructive or central sleep apnea, or cardiac, such as cyanotic congenital heart disease. It could also be that your oximeter is giving erroneous results. If these low levels are confirmed or validated, you should begin with a sleep study, in a sleep laboratory.
Hello and hope you are doing well. When a person sleeps the airways are usually patent allowing normal passage for air entry. The upper airway that is at the region of the tongue and the soft palate is the most compliant (soft) part. So, this is liable to collapse and cause airway obstruction. As the air way collapses the lungs do not have air entry leading to deoxygenation (decreased oxygen) of blood and the person wakes up.
I am on oxygen for my copd I am 40 years old a woman I use 3-4 liters of oxygen by nose cannula during the day to help me breathe better and at night I use a mask per my doctor at 8 liters per minute since I have a hard time breathing at night the only problem is I find my self waking up with the mask on my stomach not on my face I pull it off in my sleep so I wake up gasping for air then my oxygen level is at 56 any suggestions on how to keep the mask on my face so I don't rip it off at night
She does have sleep apnea and does a cpap at night. Her heart and lung specialist took her off of the oxygen today. I am very concerned because she is still out of breath very easily. The doctors said she was 10 pounds over weight and that is why she is out of breath. I just can't imagine being just 10 pounds over weight and being that out of breath. What should be done? Does this sound right to anyone else. Please help we are going around in circles.
An oxygen level of 54 is very low...normal levels range between 95-100. I am very glad that you are getting a sleep study, sleep apnea could easily explain why your O2 levels are dropping so low. If the sleep study is positive for apnea, you will be treated with CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure which will keep your airway open, hopefully preventing those obstructions and desats. The machine blows a prescribed continuous pressure into your airway via a mask or nasal pillows....
I am in the process of writing a blog post on low oxygen levels. It should be posted to the free online community, Heart Failure Solutions, by tomorrow. Your best bet is to educated yourself in how to build the health of your heart and lungs. That is what our online community is all about! Come join us! I would also strongly advise that you ask to have your oxygen level checked while you are walking and doing normal daily activities as well.
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