Cpap headgear nasal pillows

Common Questions and Answers about Cpap headgear nasal pillows

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with the Nasal pillows, its very easy for me to get a drink from the straw. I don't have to remove anything. And they supplied me with the Chin strap when I told them about my concerns, they also offered a full mask, I didn't like that, so the nasal pillows are working for me.
I've tried to use CPAP for more than a year with no success, using full mask, nasal mask or nasal pillows with chin strap. They either keep me from falling asleep, or I can't get them easily reseated without leaks if I have to get out of bed during the night. I also have trouble keeping the headgear/chin strap in place even when it's correctly adjusted; it slips off my head. I have to over-tighten it; not only uncomfortable, but it irritates my skin. Have you tried CPAP Pro?
Yes, I take Nasacort AQ spray and allergy tabs, even use the Neti Pot with saline solution to clean my sinuses, but my symptoms persist. I clean the tubing, nasal pillows and headgear with mild soap and warm water daily. If I don't use the CPAP, my symptoms disappear. If it weren't for my being scared about the fact that I stopped breathing at least 20 times during sleep study, I would kick this machine to the curb! At wit's end and truly desperate for immediate relief, what should I do now?
Another mask now has an inflatable cushion that lets the wearer adjust the fit and prevent leaks. Nasal pillows are another option. Instead of wearing a triangular mask, the user inserts into the nostrils two small flexible pieces (shaped somewhat like mushroom caps) that are attached to a plastic adapter that is in turn attached to the tubing. One of the gel based masks available in the market are Profile Lite masks.
Several masks on the market now are made out of gel-like material. Nasal pillows are another option. Instead of wearing a triangular mask, the user inserts into the nostrils two small flexible pieces (shaped somewhat like mushroom caps) that are attached to a plastic adapter that is in turn attached to the tubing. One of the gel based masks available in the market are Profile Lite masks. This mask uses the same headgear and whisper swivel valve your mask has but has two big improvements.
The next treatment option that is available is CPAP, or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and this is typically the first line treatment that’s offered to people with significant sleep apnea. Basically, it’s a mask that fits tightly over your nose and a machine at the bedside blows some gentle air pressure through your nose via the mask to sort of stent your airway open while you’re sleeping at night.
Sleep study #2 (3/07) showed the sleep apnea had gotten worse. I've tried CPAP (nasal pillows, nasal mask, face mask) but can't tolerate the masks/headgear - they keep me from sleeping and/or they wake me up. My ENT surgeon and a second ENT don't see any physiological causes for the nostril collapse. I'm awaiting results of sleep study #3.
It doesn't leak and takes care of the apnea, according to the data they extracted from the card. The nasal pillows they gave me, did not stay in place and I had an episode while on it. My setting is 14. Not sure any of this is helpful, but the fact he wakes up with it is why I thought I'd share my experience.
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