Coronary angiogram procedure

Common Questions and Answers about Coronary angiogram procedure

angiogram

I've had a coronary angiogram done within two weeks of each other. And although my leg was quite sore (they used the right site both times), it did not cause a problem. If I remember correctly, back in the day when the first started doing these procedures (my dad was one of the early stent recipients), they use to do the angiogram and stent emplacement in two separate procedures over a two day span.
hey my dad is suppose to go in for an angiogram but he fears what might happen to him if he does. i was wondering if there was possible any alternative procedure or something else he could possibly do.
I have just been scheduled for an angiogram and I'm scared to no end I have a 3 year old son I love to death same as my soon to be wife. I'm so scared something will go wrong during the surgery how coming are complications? Also my ej is 73 is this bad?
To have witnessed this in the test, they would have seen the left ventricle motion is not normal, they wouldn't have been able to see inside any coronary arteries. The angiogram has identified the reason as a restriction in the circumflex. I get the feeling they are waiting until you actually get symptoms before intervening. Have they given you any medication, such as aspirin to lower the chance of heart attack? How about your lipid profile? What is your blood pressure like?
So is it really wise to do a risky angiogram or would it be money well spent to do the 64-slice Coronary CT Angiograph​y?
Has anyone had an angiogram with the catheter inserted in arm or neck instead of the groin? I don't think I could take the groin without serious nerve spasms.
they are requiring me for now to have this test "coronary angiogram". what i want to know is: is it really needed? do i really need to have it? could someone please help me understand.
18, Soft plaques seen in proximal LAD and D1 segment. ....You had a CT angiogram and included is a separate procedure a calcium score. The CT angiogram views the channel (lumen) of the vessels for any hard plaque buildup that would cause a narrowing of the vessel for blood flow and if serious could cause symptoms of chest pain, etc. Soft plaque resides between the layers of the vessel To add what others have said.
My father (age: 84) has recently undergone CT Coronary Angiogram (Ultra low dose 700 slice). The report has the following indications: - Calcium Scoring 509 - Left Main Coronary Artery - Origin shows calcification causing mild luminal stenosis - Left Anterior Descending Artery - Type III, Origin and proximal segment diffuse calcic plaque causing moderate to severe luminal stenosis. Mid LAD shows minimal calcification.
53 yr old female, former smoker, cholesterol 118, HDL 27,Trig 99,VLDL 20, LDL-CAL 71, overweight, cannot exercise due to shattered bones in foot. Had new 64 slice ct coronary angiogram. Cardiologist that read the report stated that he is new at reading this (hospital has only done the tests on paying patients for 1 week). He reported RCA; technically a dominant vessel which is free of significant disease in its proximal course.
An angiogram is a procedure that images a contrast agent that passes through the vessels during rest and then with exertion to observe if there is any obstruction. There shouldn't be any risk with a CT scan, and if the procedure is with a cath the risk may be a problem at the entery site (groan) as a diabetic may have some difficuty with the healing process other risks are minimal i.e. rupture, uncontrolled bleeding, etc. Doctors are quickly available if there is a problem.
you are making a few statements without any connection to information that I can find, maybe you should try again. There is a procedure called an angiogram also heart catheter exam. Is this something you are referring to? You may find some help **** some reading at: http://www.medhelp.org/search?
My annual physical showed a normal EKG but my dr. ordered a stress echo saying I had chest pains. Echo was normal in all aspects but post exercise showed:"left ventricular response to be hyperdynamic with hypokinesis of the mid to distal inferior wall consistent with stress induced myocardial ischemia." The appointment with a cardiologist, he did no further testing, has now produced an angiogram scheduled with possible angioplasty.
If for some reason you would be damaged by the procedure I would imagine it would be immediatly obvious, meaning while the procedure was occuring. It is probably not related.
Thanks for the info. An angiogram has been suggested more then likely I will have the proceedure, As someone said keeping still for several hours is the hardest part. My results were from a stress test,which I was able to do physically without pain, at the end I was out of breath but not breathing laboriously. If I could resolve this problem without surgery I would. Can that happen? Thru excercise and diet?
Left Coronary artery: (TF?NI), (JL4.0& JR4.0 6F) Left Main Stem: Short,normal bifurcating vessel. Left Anterior Descending Artery: Mild proximal disease and subtotal mid occlusion. Distal LAD fills antegradely with TIM II flow. Fair sized second diagonal branch shows sever proximal disease. Left Circumflex Artery: Continues as obtuse marginal branch which shows mild diffuse disease in mid and distal parts. Right Coronary Artery: Dominant vessel with total mid occlusion.
In my angiogram it noted that LMCA - Normal and long, LAD - Type III vessel, Proximal LAD shows 50% eccentric narrowing, D1 Medium sized and normal, D2 large and normal, LCX - Non-dominant, continues as OM2 and Normal. OM1 shows 90% Descartes narrowing. RCA - Dominant, large and Ecstatic. PDA and PLV are normal. Impression : Single vessel disease. Advice : PTCA stent to proximal OM1.
- LV Angiogram:- Good functioning Left Ventrical. Coronary Arteries:- Left Main Stem Normal. LAD - The LAD seems to be occluded quite proximally. It gives rise to a decent first septal perforator which seems to be diseased throughout. Circumflex - The circumflex is a chunky dominant vessel with no obtuse marginal seen, however the terminal part of the AV circumflex has got 60 - 70% long segment of diffuse disease.
The procedure is not entirely risk free. In the right hands, it is a reasonably safe procedure, and is surprisingly easy to get through. Moreover, the benefit is usually finding out whether you need more work or not, something you no doubt need to do, and something which would normally easily justify the risks. When I did it, the doctor played music and cracked jokes. Didn't feel a thing. Bring a friend or family member for sure. Also, choose your doctor wisely.
I had coronary stents put in 2 months ago and I am still having alot of pain in the right groin area. I cannot stand or walk for any length of time.
In my last hospital admission, I was speaking with a Cardiologist before my emergency Angiogram. I asked if the catheter could be put through my radial artery rather than the femoral. He said that it isn't a problem even though I've had a Cabgx3. When I got to the Angio-suite I was told "you cannot have anything except the femoral artery used because we don't have images of your bypass and we could take a wrong turning". Personally I find this crazy.
A catheterization is an invasive procedure that can more definitively determine if there are significant coronary artery blockages and allows planning of angioplasty or bypass surgery. I hope this has been useful. I wish you the best of luck. Feel free to write back. Information provided here is for general purposes only. Specific questions should be addressed to your own doctor.
I just want to know how helpful a ct angiogram is in finding potential life threatting coronary artery disease.. Has anyone had this exam before with false negative results.. I would hat to submite myself to so much radiation exposure and still not have a final clear diagnosis.
My husband recently went an angioplasty. During the procedure, his femorial artery was punctured causing a pseudoaneurysm, which then caused a blood clot to form on the outside of the artery wall. This resulted in them going back in to do a thrombosis injection. Because of the where the puncture was located, they had to actually operate on my husband. He has a 7 inch incision in his groin area. They had to drain the blood clot and repair the artery.
However the images that they then took showed an inferoapical defect and they are suggesting an angiogram.. She is extremely hesitent to have one at her age. How necessary is this procedure and how do we decide?
My father had undergone TMT and was shown positive - so the doctors asked him to do angiogram - So he got the procedure done, now the results are out and the doctors are recommending him to go for ByPass surgery. I am attaching the reports and the xray - Please let me know how bad is his condition? Our whole family is stressed out. Please help....
I usually go to a cardiologist in another city. But my cardiologist could not perform my scheduled angiogram. My symptoms before this angiogram were chest pain with exertion of any kind. After this angiogram, I have had blood pressure problems, breathing problems, dry cough, shortness of breath and all the other symptoms that my cardiologist wanted me to do an angiogram for. He had said that if I needed an other stent put in. I would need a bypass even though I have small vessels.
Procedure: Left Heart catheter Access: Right Femoral artery Catheters Used: 6 fr,JL4,JR4, Rcb,Im Cineagios: Left and right Coronaries Grafts Indication: Unstable Angina Complication: None (though I had a major allergy to something during the procedure, which become really apparent the day after) I was told it may have been angioderma Left Main Artery: Diffusely diseased - 90% distal stenosis LAD
was able to get the spasms on video and pictures during an angiogram. The problem I have is that not just a portion of the artery spasms the whole artery on both sides of my heart spasms, the Doctors have said this is very rare and are trying to treat with medication. The meds make me very ill, and unable to cope with simple day to day activities. Does any one know if there is a surgical procedure or any thing else that can help this problem.
A Month later my cardiologist called me to have another angiogram, he had looked at the images, and could see another problem which was possibly missed. My Cardiologist was away when I had the procedure, but his registrar did the procedure. He was confused, because the images showed the vessel fully open, not a single problem could be seen. However, he decided to go with the consultants expertise and did an FFR (fractional flow rate) on the vessel.
MedHelp Health Answers