Blood sugar after insulin injection

Common Questions and Answers about Blood sugar after insulin injection

blood-sugar

I am now taking Levemir in the morning and at night taking Apidra. Since I have changed to this insulin my blood sugar is going upby alot. I was at 176 this morning and within a few hours it was at 296. This has never happened before and I have not changed anything in my eating. Why is it going up so much and how can I make this stop?
even though I eat a normal portion of meal, my blood sugar goes up after each meal. but it goes down to normal level after 4-5 hours. it makes me confused because I cant inject more because I will get low, what should I do?
My blood sugar went up to 400 or something when I started tx in Sept. My Dr. wanted to put me on the oral drug for high sugar but it is hard on your liver. I decided that I had to get it under control!(I didn't need another med) I gave up all sugar in Oct. and watch carbs and fats also. My last test was 88. I wonder will it straighen out after I complete tx or will I always be predisposed to it. I've read alot about metabolic disorder lately and how it affects tx.
I think after giving humalog, body goes in emergency, and some times increases blood pressure and it in turn increases blood sugar. Probably I should take humalog after eating. b. Blood pressure increases as blood sugar goes to normal, Even some times, after pushing insulin ,pressure goes high Before going to bed I take blood pressure medication, push levemir Yestarday evening sugar came down to 7, I was glad, at 5 am I ate, reduced humalog to 11 in place of 13, but after 2 hours, it was 10.
increase protein, good fats and veggies, decrease bad fats and sugar/starch. This will keep you satiated, reduce your blood sugar, reduce your inflammation markers. Here some meal ideas: unsweetened low fat yoghurt with LSA or nuts and apples for breakfast, some eggs. A handful of nuts for a snack. Lunch: huge salad with mixed veggies and greens with thuna or a grilled steak. Celery with almond butter or carrots stick with hummus as a snack.
The first few times it happened she was just slightly jerking and we were able to get her to sit up, drink some juice and get her blood sugar up. I lowered her basal rates for the sleeping in times and we have made it mandatory she is up by 10am. Things got better. However last night she had a slight high (in the 200's) and we think she overdid the insulin. This morning at around 8am my husband heard her bed making noise and went to check on her.
The greatest blood sugar lowering effect is between 2 and 12 hours after the injection. This blood sugar lowering may last up to 24 hours. The same injection site should not be used 2 times in a row. Rotate your injection sites. Appropriate sites are into the fatty tissue on your abdomen, back of your upper arm, thigh, or buttock. If you are unsure how to inject the insulin, call your doctor's office and ask.
I'm honestly clueless on what to do now. My blood sugar right now won't go down and I'm currently doing a manual injection in my arm to see if it will drop at all. Does anyone know what I can do? Can I eat? I'm afraid my B.G going higher, so I haven't been eating.
Hello everyone, Recently I began using insulin pens after years of injecting with syringes. I appreciate the convenience of the pen, but have had a few incidents that caused some concerns about the insulin actually injecting properly. I was told by my diabetes health staff that the way to verify that the insulin has injected properly is to look for a small drop of insulin on the tip of the needle after injecting.
to clarify, it should say, take no insulin as iam NOT eating any carbs, sorry for the error
The internist has decided that I need to be on a low dose of insulin, because my blood sugar levels have started to creep up. I am 36 weeks today. Anyone have any info or experience with being on insulin??
Protein and MOST vegs will NOT raise your blood sugar so then you will not need Insulin. But you do need Insulin if you eat allot of carbs. So if you go on a high protein low carb way of eating and still take some Insulin you will loose weight naturally and in a healthy way..You will also feel better when your blood sugars are not all over the board. When I eat pizza I feel fine then hrs later the fat from the pizza makes me go over 400 so I have learned what sets my sugars off really bad.
She explained that it was because her hormones were so off the wall during that time that the insulin was not doing as good of a job then before. Your suppose to take insulin via injection because it goes straight into your blood stream and doesnt affect the baby so much as an insulin pill might.
I wonder how long you have been a type 1 diabetic -- could you still be honeymooning, occasionally producing some insulin of your own? What preceded this event -- did you participate in anything stressful (good or bad stress can cause me to drop low)? Also, how old was your insulin -- if you use a long-lasting insulin like Lantus, if it is older than 1 month old, it can misbehave.
Increase exercise - 30 minutes of moderate exercise after each meal will be helpful. 3. Increase insulin dose appropriately until blood sugars are control. Please ask more questions if we can further help.
Hello, JFS. I'm not a medical professional, just the parent of a kid with diabetes. It sounds like the only thing you have NOT changed out is you! Are you reusing the same locations for your sites all the time or are you moving them around well? If you use the same locations, it is possible that you have created scar tissue under your skin, which would prevent the delivery.
I've had other cortisone shots (shoulders, hips) in my life before and the blood sugar increase only stayed a few days. This time my blood sugar is still high after the injection and doesn't want to budge. My fasting runs about 188 or so. I take 15 mg of Actos. I have type 2, and I'm a female in late 50's. My doc doesn't want to increase the Actos yet. My question is..is this level 188-200 fasting high? What should I eat for breakfast with this blood sugar level?
No, he cannot stop insulin. Further you should get a home blood glucose monitoring kit so that his blood sugars can be checked at home and adjustments made, if necessary. I think both you and your father need to read up on diabetes, it's causes and it's treatment. Can he get to attend a diabetes education class. This at least would be a step in the right direction. I can recommend a book called 'using insulin' by John Walsh, as a starting point as well. Your father is still young.
I have had hep c for 25 years, Just recently I was put on injection of insulin for my diabetes...
First comes PRE-DIABETES (a fasting blood sugar above 100)....When you start becoming insensitive to insulin, your blood sugar starts to go up. A study showed that a blood sugar above 100 lowers SVR. Then the insulin resistance gets worse.....and for a long time your pancreas works fast and makes extra insulin, so it's able to keep your blood sugar in the normal range even though you're insulin resistant..
And it calls for a regimen that gives Logan more control. Biphasic and Regular insulin simply doesn't do that. Blood sugar levels rise and fall in an unpredictable and very confusing fashion. And good control becomes unachievable. First prize would be to put him on a pump. It is the most responsive and flexible system available. But if you can't do that, get him on a basal/bolus regimen. Lantus is often referred to as the "poor man's pump" because it provides peakless basal action.
I will have mid- to late-afternoon lows if I let the bottle of insulin get old. Lantus works by crystallizing after injection and the crystals slowly release all day. But in small print in the paperwork that comes with a bottle of Lantus, there is the warning that it should be replaced every 30 days. Unlike other insulins, that work the same until we use them up, the Lantus insulin does seem to lose its 24-hour release capability after about a month.
her sugar is high, she takes a shot of fast acting insulin???? When? After she eats? This is called a correction shot and the correct dose (correction factor) needs to be figured out in order to know how many units will drop her blood sugar by how far. It is not a surprise that she is experiencing both highs and lows frequently if she is managing her diabetes this way. You might want to find out WHY she doesn't want to monitor her health.
I had actually switched my breakfast from eggs to cereal to decrease my egg intake and found that even whole wheat cereal wreaked havoc with my blood sugar. I also learned that for me what I used to call a low calorie diet wasn't always appropriate. For instance I would eat a simple salad for lunch and find my blood sugar way too low before dinner because my lunch had no carbs at all! Few books or dieticians prescribe a diet that is very specific for just this reason.
One of the tests I would recommend is a Hemoglobin A1c which can reveal a history of elevated blood sugar. The difference between type 1 and type 2 essentially is in management. Typically type 2 diabetes has adult onset. It can often be managed through diet and lifestyle modification, with/or without the use of oral diabetes medication. Type 1 used to be called Juvenile Diabetes. This was the diabetes most frequently noted in children.
I have just switched from Mixtard/Actrapid to Lantus/Actrapid 3 days ago due to very poor blood sugar control at night and in the morning. The current dosage of Lantus is 15 units in the morning with additional 15 units of Actrapic before evety meal i.e. breakfast, lunch and dinner. Blood sugar level in the morning shoots up to 15-16mmol (fasting), by noon it will remain at 9-12mmol (before lunch) and will gradually comes down to 4-5mmol before dinner.
The obejective needs to be to get the blood sugar into the target raange before meals and to inject only enough insulin to get it back down there after 2 hours. Because of his medical history and normal weight, your husband may need to be treated more like a Type 1. And if you are serious about wanting to stop the hypos and get in control, you need to separate out the basal and bolus shots.
I wanted to mention that the longlasting insulin could help even if you go to bed late. I have found that as long as I take my insulin at the same time everynight it doesn't matter what time you go to bed...just watch what you are eating after you take that injection. There is also a possibility of taking your longlasting insulin in the morning. My stepdad does that. Ask your endocrinologist.
I'm new to insulin, has anyone else experienced higher blood sugar readings after starting Lantus insulin?
Obviously it's almost impossible to control the blood sugar this way. We've tried different injection sites without much difference. It seems that the problem is that the insulin is just not absorbed rapidly. My spouses obesity could be part of this (farther to go to get into the blood stream?) We've been wondering if switching back to regular syringes because the longer length might get the insulin into the system sooner. Any suggestions?
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