Blood glucose levels before and after eating

Common Questions and Answers about Blood glucose levels before and after eating

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I checked it the next morning and it was 95. The following night after dinner it was 106 and tody after eating a pancake with syrup for breakfast, and drinking a juice box and eating some other carbs his sugar level was 105. Would a lot of candy cause sugar levels to go up to 159 in a non-diabetic? He hasn't been urinating more than usual and not excessively thirsty. I am just so afraid of him having to go through the insulin shots.
When did you have your blood glucose tested? Was it before you ate or after? Actually, personally, I consider 125 very good on either side of eating. Just me.
if you keep the same diet but burn less energy your blood sugar will likely increase some follow a low GI diet on tx others SVR by mostly eating ice cream if you are really concerned do a fasting insulin and glucose test from the same blooddraw and calculate your HOMA score for insulin resistants.
Most women with diabetes are classified as high risk pregnancies and should be followed by a team of specialists who understand the risks (to mom AND child) and can help the mom manage their blood sugars superbly well before conception and during those crucial 9 months. It is crucially important for your baby that s/he develop in as normal a fetal environment as is humanly possible. Miscarriages and deformities can result from hostile fetal environments.
I am very much a night person regularly up til 4 in the morning and eating and drinking before i go to bed. I am white, not over weight and have no family history. Could my high reading be due to my eating and sleeping pattern even if i had an early night the night before my tests or do you think i have diabetes? thankyou Also to ot quickly i had previously had a blood test back in 2009 and my morning test was 4.7.
Get down to normal weight and try to figure out an exercise routine. Take a brief walk after lunch. Walking really helps to lower and stabilize your glucose levels. Sounds off the wall but it's true. And do make an appointment to see your PCP and have those two organs checked asap. Good luck and good health.
-( they need to see how your body reacts towards high levels of glucose and some foods and drinks can effect the results so id check with your doctor or midwife xx
Something is not right here; Your 8-10 hour fasting levels indicate prediabetes yet your A1c averages 205 mg/dl daily - high diabetic glucose levels. Where were these test performed? Same blood draw? What does b/f mean? Please don't make up medical acronyms that only you understand. Testing directly after exercising provides a false positive. Brisk exercise perks your adrenaline which in turn tells your body to produce more glucose for energy. Exercise after eating, not before.
Your daily average level of 10 mmo/l is dangerously high and maximum of 14 mmol/l is suicidal. Sadly to say your blood glucose levels are out of control. Testing once a day, in your case, will not provide you with adequate data to learn what is causing your blood glucose to elevate. This is the testing regimen first time users must perform before they step down to once a day or even once a week testing. The latter takes months and in some case years to get to.
Good to catch this early and then you can modify your diet and activity levels and maybe stop it progressing. Focus on lower carb foods. Exercise daily. Normalise weight. Best wishes.
Thanks for the info and timely response.
I was given several glucose tablets to eat, and my blood sugar was monitored before, 30 minutes after, and an hour after. My blood sugar level never did spike. It reached 110 at the 30 minute interval. A follow-up A1C was ordered and the results came back normal. However, I question the results.
There are some books out by doctors that give pretty precise information about blood sugar before and after eating and that suggest that even in normal people, it will go up after a meal high in carbs. "Normal is around 70's to 80's but can go up to 140. They set 140 as an arbitrary line for the diagnosis of diabetes - anyone with higher than 140 BG is considered diabetic by most regular physicians - at least that is what various doctors told me. Hope this helps.
told me her glucose level in her urine was 3+ and blood stick was 288. He was VERY concerned and told me to take her in to her dr. the next morning. Her regular dr. told her fasting glucose was 0 and blood stick was 127. She told me the dr.'s machines were wrong the night before (it was an Urgent Care Center) and she's fine ... asked me to bring her back in a year. I'm getting a second opinion, but she is 13 and we have no family history.
A person could eat a meal including a large potatoe and peas and send their sugar through the roof. Eating a lot of pasta or rice will do the same thing. Because of my size, 5'6 and currently 169lbs down from 212lbs two years ago, I eat 45 good carbs per meal, three times a day, and 15 good carbs for a snack two to three times a day. As a snack I eat a yogurt at 13carbs, or a Glucerna shake at 18carbs.
Hi Angel, target levels for pregnancy or trying to get pregnant are:- Fasting: 70 - 95 Before eating: 70 - 95 1 hour after eating: < 140 2 hours after eating: < 120 I think you are going to need to be adding in insulin to get your levels down. Some eating advice: you need to severely restrict your carbs for now (1 whole wheat bun is too much). Don't eat low fat foods. The fat is very important to help slow down the digestion of carbohydrates.
Patients whos livers are failing are usually reduced to skin and bones and lose all muscle mass before getting a transplant. Muscle wasting will go away after transplant. Cirrhotic patients have limited capability to store nutrients in the liver. For that reason, you need to eat very frequently in order to preventing use of your own muscle mass as a source of nutrition for vital organs; we recommend you eat at least three meals a day and three to four snacks between meals.
I had a fasting blood sugar level of 93 first thing in the AM and all my levels after eating were 135 or below. Could the 191 have been error? Should I request to have the one hour test repeated first before I torture myself with the three hour test? Or should I just suck it up and do the test. I just have a hard time with a "gestational diabetes" diagnosis when I have yet to see any abnormal values after two days of continuous testing....
Many of us have target BGs for one hour after eating, 2 hours after eating, and maybe even 3-4 hours after eating. YOu mentioned that you did your test 30 minutes after eating and I'm not certain that there're reliable targets for that moment in time. Even a non-diabetic's body needs a chance to send insulin in response to a carbo-laden meal I'd suggest that you collect your data and discuss your results with your doctor.
It is almost impossible to diagnose hypoglycemia by drawing blood after you suffer an attack of dizziness, weakness or fainting because your body produces adrenalin immediately and raises blood sugar levels to normal before your doctor can draw blood. It can be diagnosed by feeding you lots of sugar and measuring your blood sugar level every half hour for several hours.
I was wondering if there is a connection between high blood glucose levels and PVCs? About two months ago, I started a diet that was devoid of carbohydrates. My physician had warned me for years about my rising blood sugar, but I paid him no heed. Finally, in late March he gave me an ultimatum to cut my blood glucose level or start diabetic medication. This caught my attention.
Random glucose testing will typically not detect this type of problem, since you only experience symptoms after eating. If this is a continuous problem, a blood glucose test both before and after a meal is a good place to start. If the problem is due to too much insulin after a meal, you would expect low levels of glucose since the insulin is removing too much glucose from the blood.
I have been at or over 300 in my blood sugar levels for two weeks and my doctor is away. Should I go to the emergency room? When should I panic? What other steps can I take before my doctor gets back?
From what I have read, I would need to take 75g of sugar and test my blood glucose levels every 30 minutes for 4 hours. Is this the proper way to self test for reactive hypoglycemia? If I post the results, would someone be able to determine if my levels are normal? My blood glucose levels drop below 60 on numerous occasions. I have had an A1C test and my doctor says it is normal.
Before eating lunch and two hours after eating lunch. Before supper and two hours after eating supper. And at bedtime. Experiment a bit and fast during the morning. Take your blood sugar and eat a single apple or 190 calories of yogurt. Take your blood sugar an hour after and an hour after that. Make note of the drop. Do the same and exercise for a half hour. Then check your sugar. Perform these tests without medication for a day and then with medication.
I didn't fast at all before my glucose test & all my levels were normal & i didnt eat anything before either. Just call you doc & ask her what you can have people are diff so something thats good for others might not be good for you. I call my doc and asked before i came in.
Do you have to eat something before taking the glucose test? And if so does it matter what?
I would recommend recording your blood sugar levels fasting, and 1 hour after you eat and speaking about it with your doctor. The fasting level that you mention in your question is elevated. You want to speak with your doctor soon, so that you can get your sugars regulated either by diet and exercise or medications if that is what is recommended. It also might be helpful to keep a food journal until you see your doctor.
they take your blood a total of 4 times... you have to fast until the test and they take it for fasting levels... then you drink the drink within 5 minutes and every hour up until 3 they take your blood... if you fail 2 or more of those blood sugar levels you have gestational diabetes. ..
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