Aspiration pneumonia lung sounds

Common Questions and Answers about Aspiration pneumonia lung sounds

pneumonia

He's been seen 3x by the same vet and had 2 cxr's that showed what he called probably aspiration pneumonia in his RML. He's been on 2 courses of antibiotics, each x30 days. The order that comes out of his mouth is terrible and it does clear up somewhat after he's been on the antibiotics for about 2 weeks and the cough lessens but never goes away.
That could include an acquired disease such as bronchiectasis, inherited disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF) or even chronic disease due to aspiration into your lung of a foreign body of a type not apparent on chest x-ray. A rattle is most often due to mucus in a medium to large bronchus, commonly called an airway. None of this explains the chronic cough and throat clearing for 3 years, prior to pneumonia.
We had an xray done and they saw cloudy-ness all throughout his lungs, which led them to believe it was a bacterial pneumonia and not aspiration pneumonia. He is on two different antibiotics, zenequin and clavamox and has been for the last week and a half. We've also been inducing a cough 3-4 times a day to assist him in clearing his lungs. We are seeing slight improvement in his cough, which isn't as frequent and not as productive, but he is still very fatigued.
5 cm mass was observed in my lower left lung. This was confirmed with a March lung CT, along with other lung masses. An April PET scan showed uptake in numerous regions including the left lung base above the diaphragm (SUV 3.5), mediastinum (6), periaoric or left hilar (6), lesion along the aorta (5.4), left suprahilar location , thoracic inlet, right paratracheal location (3).
Sounds like it could be Aspiration Pneumonia. Did you have anything to eat or drink, other than sips of water, in the 12 hr before the anesthesia? Link at: http://www.emedicine.com/EMERG/topic464.htm Aspiration Pneumonia Excerpt: "Causes: Conditions that may reduce a patient's gag reflex and/or ability to maintain an airway include aspiration as a coincident risk.
I have a severly delayed child who has been getting bouts of pneumonia every month for the past year. I have been told that most of these pmeumonias are due to aspiration. However, he has had a fundoplication and cannot vomit, but he does not handle his own secretions well at all. He has asthma, broncho pulminary displaygia and chronic lung disease.
However, aspiration usually does not resolve by itself, and this would usually progress with some form of pneumonia or lung infection. A possible test that I can think of to evaluate more this problem is through a sleep study usually in a sleep laboratory with prolonged EEG monitoring. Regards.
I spent 3 weeks in the hospital and none of their pneumonia protocol worked. They then dx'd it as aspiration pneumonia due to bile reflux and did surgery for the reflux, unresponsive to meds. FYI: CDC and infectious disease dr. could find anything. Blood work reported as unremarkable. The endo. in the hospital did not show anything other than mucous plugs present in all the airways. The biopsy was reported as unremarkable. No pleural effusion was reported so apparently it resolved?
Exams and Tests Physical examination may reveal crackling sounds in the lungs. Aspiration pneumonia is caused by inhaling foreign material (usually food, liquids, vomit, or secretions from the mouth) into the lungs. This may lead to an inflammatory reaction, a lung infection (pneumonia), or a collection of pus in the lungs (lung abscess).
Sounds complicated. ABPM (allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis) is certainly a diagnostic possibility. What's odd about this is you don't have obstruction on your lung function test. (Obviously, you could expel the entire functional vital capacity within one second. (FVC = FEV1) People with significant airflow obstruction cannot do that.
Drs say takes time for effusion to heal even months, next xray scheduled for July 19th still have decreased breath sounds in left lung. Not taking any medication as cause is unknown. I am very worried about this. My mom died of pulmonary fibrosis with pleural calcification, grandmother and great-grandmother of emphysema. What are recommended next steps? Some articles I have read say that it is important to find out cause of Pleural effusion as you must treat underlying condition.
If, as hally mentioned, swallowing is a possible concern, a swallowing study may need to be performed as well to rule out aspiration before aspiration pneumonia develops.
Yours could have been a response to the anesthetic or other medicines or to aspiration. It would be good to check if aspiration occurred, and what medicines you were given at the time of surgery, including the anesthetics, for your future safety, should you again have to be anesthetized.
The internal organs had moved upward in the chest cavity causing atelectasis of the right lung. They plicated the right diaphragm and re-positioned the organs. He was initially given a good prognosis, but now we're told we need a miracle! Currently he remains on a ventilator after failing extubation 3x. He is unable to cough, causing secretions to build up, requiring frequent suctioning. If no improvement, they may do a tracheotomy.
I have atelectasias, and right lower lung fibrosis w/ rt hemidiaphragmatic paralysis. I get chronic aspiration of gastric contents when I sleep due to severe Gastroparesis and Scleroderma Esophagus (w/ Barrett's, and a lax LES) and no motility at all. Gravity is how food gets into my stomach, but how it comes back up hours later - even when sitting up - when asleep - is quite strange. But nerve damage and my long long list of diseases - I guess I should wonder when things DON'T happen.
Maybe he has lung problems. (he has had a bit of pneumonia). We have air cleaners in our house, no pets and no smoking. He cannot do much of any kind of real active activity without coughing. He has had swollen sinus area (says his ENT) and blackish eyes. Sometimes he feels sick to his stomach. What should I do?
Did she give you a chest Xray? (and did she do other tests?) If not, I would go to a good Pulmonologist (lung specialist doc), and get carefully examined, and get a chest Xray, blood gases, etc. I think it's better to be seen by a good doc, and not "diagnosed" by telephone, or by internet... Good luck to you! I hope you feel better, soon! Concerned lady <a href=http://cantbreathesuspectvcd.com>http://cantbreathesuspectvcd.
Singulair keeps him dry and from post nasal drip, which causes irritation to the lungs, which causes him to cough so much that sometimes he throws up. When this happens, it sometimes causes aspiration, which has lead to pneumonia. He gets pneumonia quite frequently. He's also on a feeding tube but only through the night now.
It's very important that you are on the correct medication for the gerd to prevent damage to your lungs,trachea and esophagus.and aspiration pneumonia The acidity of gerd can cause a form of copd. The restrictive breathing you are feeling can also be a cause of the gerd and the inflammation of the airways.Have you had a PH study or upper G.I. to determine the severity of your gerd?
Hi Dennis, I have discussed with my MS team who do not believe it is related to swallowing or silent aspiration. My cough is around 12 - 16 coughing fits a day which leave me exhausted and close to fainting and as I said with a retention issue the continence crisis is escalating, I cannot speak at all at this time and it can last several minutes. The joke is that I am a lecturer at a university in the UK, as if MS wasn't enough - how do I start lectures next week eh?
I am a 34 year old non-smoker. I smoke a pack a day in my youth, but have been free of that for almost 8 years. I was diagnosed wth asthma at 14, but did not receive proper care or care for my asthma responsibly. I was always short of breath, but did not use my inhaler unless I was having an acure attack. Last February I was ill. I don't remember much, only that I was tired, cold, and a little delirious. My oxygen was down and my heart rate was up. I don't know if I had a fever.
I think what your vet is concerned about is aspiration pneumonia. All that means is that the contents of the stomach reflux upward, and make it possible for those contents to get inhaled into the trachea and down into the lungs - thereby causing pneumonia. What meds are you trying to keep the vomiting down, and are they working so far? Hope really is a miracle in that she's made it this far. She's got a ways to go, but she's going in the right direction!
Aspiration can cause acute pneumonia. If aspiration occurs over a long period of time, people may develop chronic lung disease. People who have had dysphagia for a long time are often inadequately nourished and lose weight. Causes Although most people take swallowing for granted, it is actually a complicated process. For swallowing to take place normally, the brain must unconsciously coordinate the activity of numerous small muscles of the throat and the esophagus.
Since then I found that I almost certainly had (still have?) Aspiration Pneumonia or Aspiration Pneumonitus. But (old cliché) I’m not a doctor. But everything sure seems to fit. I don’t know if this is standard care? Seems like when a 69 year old calls the PCP with fluid in the lungs, etc. you would think they would make some kind of appointment for an exam – maybe within a day or two? I mean don’t doctors-groups have to have some time budgeted for things like that?
If acid goes further into the lungs, it may cause aspiration pneumonia. This causes permanent lung damage. You should by any means avoid these attacks.
It's a hideous way to die, because even if they are rescued, after a week or two they can die of bacterial pneumonia from aspiration. I don't mean to upset you for the world telling you these things--it's just that your friend is dicing with her life and she's not talking to us, you are. The info everyone has given you tonight should really up the ante for her knowing just how dangerous mixing these two things can be.
we also have to put her on predisone- and sometimes antibiotics to prevent her getting pneumonia..we also put her on Flovent and singulair when she was little.(from lung specialist) usually this works great for her and she soon gets better. However this past month she's been real sick and obstructive airways- and medicine isn't working- so lung specialist said it is time for her to be evaluated for her airways and a procedure to fix it. appointment is next week.
I guess the only thing that is on my mind now is Tasha's ultrasound results. She has a mass both in her lung and in her abdomen near her liver and gall bladder. She has fluid in both places. Also, the mass in her lung is leaning on her trachea, thus the problems breathing she has been having. Also, the heart wall has thickened. Obviously, I am devastated by the news. She has very little time left.
It is contraindicated for stroke rehab, and will almost surely result in aspiration of food and pneumonia. When I started with my little pal I banned insure, for starters. You should get a small silver teaspoon. Silver is an anti-bacterial. Initially my 101 year old (she was 100 then) could not respond to stimuli, turn her head or lift a hand. It was months before she uttered a single word. I just left her an hour ago and she said "I'll bet you want to go home now. It's O.K.
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