Aricept effectiveness

Common Questions and Answers about Aricept effectiveness

aricept

I've have been prescribed Aricept for cognitive problems and have been experiencing some symptoms and was wondering whether it was safe to continue. The doctor instructed that I take 5mg then after 2-3days if I didn't notice anything different go up to 10mg. Well I did that and it seems I went up too quickly. I got lots of little shocks/zings soon after taking it at night. I have experienced large single shocks before to do with waking up but his it many little zaps.
He said that there are no real clinical trials to prove the effectiveness of Aricept on mild cognitive impairment, and that it would be a waste of time. I'm not sure he understands the results of the exam. I'm moderately impaired in a few specific areas. Average it out, and I'm in the 'mild' category. But at any rate, I talked him into giving me a month's worth of Aricept.
Are there any effective medicines to help these cognitive difficulties that do not interfere with the effectiveness of tamoxifin. I was taking Wellbutrin, but was told that it decreases the effectiveness of Tamoxifin because they use the same enzyme for metabolization. So, I can't take it any more. I tried ritalin, but it made me feel like a Mexican jumping bean. Amphetamine-based medicines do not agree with me. I took Provigil, but I am not sure it made any difference.
right now I pay $65 for Copaxone, and $66 for Aricept. I'm going to have to switch to a more comprehensive health plan, because the plan I'm on right now has pretty high co-pays and too much deductible.
Prozac can be stimulating, and its effectiveness with anxiety by reputation isn't as good as other ssris, but it is the most benign to stop taking. So my opinion is to listen to Nursegirl here, and be careful about people saying these drugs are easy to switch from one to another -- they often aren't.
Medications are not absorbed by the stomach obviously, nothing is. Medications are coated with other substances to help them get through the stomach so they can be broken down and absorbed by the small intestine. For example, gastric resistant Aspirin has a coating which gives the stomach a tough time attacking it, so the actual medication isn't presented to the stomach lining. Many drug companies make their medications in a variety of coatings.
from interpersonal effectiveness, radical acceptance, meditation, and more I've forgotten but have a notebook full of to remind me when I need to dig up those skills if they don't come up automatically. Last year, with pain and fatigue overwhelming me, my PCP said "you look depressed". I agreed to see a therapist at the pain clinic, who after two visits told me that I really did not seem depressed, just frustrated and in pain.
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