Appendicitis differential diagnosis

Common Questions and Answers about Appendicitis differential diagnosis

appendicitis

Without being able to review your entire history it will not be possible to give you an exact answer, but generally speaking appendicitis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis (list of possible causes) of abdominal pain. However, I would not restrict the list to only appendicitis. The typical presentation begins with periumbilical pain (pain around belly button) followed by anorexia (lack of appeitite) and nausea.
Depending on the location it can be due to cholecystitis (inflammation of gall bladder), stones in gall bladder, acidity, IBS, Crohn’s, kidney stone, appendicitis, colitis etc. There are many other causes of stomach pain. Some differential diagnosis can be done based on the location and type of pain. For more confirmed diagnosis, you may need a few tests. Please consult your doctor regarding this. Take care!
High white blood cell count is called leukocytosis. Leukocytosis may be caused by several conditions including bacterial infection, inflammation(appendicitis,inflammatory bowel disease like crohn’s and ulcerative colitis,pancreatitis etc), leukemia, trauma, or stress. Now you have to undergo differential blood count to see which particular WBC is raised and colonoscopy to confirm the pathology.
Do you have any other possible explanations? _________ Dear Dee, The diagnosis of chronic low-grade appendicitis is controversial. Most surgeons believe that there is no such entity, although with close questioning one can usually learn of a case or two in which there was chronic pain that was relieved by appendectomy. Often the symptoms were more frequent than every few years.
If there is microscopic blood in the urine , a kidney stone is certainly in the differential diagnosis. More individualized care is available at the Henry Ford Hospital and its urban campuses by calling (1 800 653 6568). We can also arrange local accommodations through this number if this is your need.
This may be a gall bladder issue or a case of appendicitis. This is only a differential diagnosis. You should always seek the advice of your primary care physician. Being seen at a "teaching hospital" can be beneficial, as it would be linked to a medical school. As such, they would have access to the latest technology and information, not to mention, no shortage of physicians who can collaborate to come up with an answer and possible treatment options.
Muscle strain due to over activity •Systemic conditions (eg, gall bladder inflammation, heart attack, appendicitis, stomach irritation) •Lack of activity (eg, a broken arm in a sling) •Nutritional deficiencies •Hormonal changes (eg, trigger point development during PMS or menopause) •Nervous tension or stress •Chilling of areas of the body (eg, sitting under an air conditioning duct; sleeping in front of an air conditioner) The fascia is a tough connective tissue which spreads throughou
Sincerely, Patsy- (25 female, smoker, heavy coffee drinker] = Dear Pasty Thanks for your question. Flank pain has a large differential diagnosis. An abdominal Xray is used to look for kidney stones. Bacteria in the urine and flank pain can mean a kidney infection / pyelonephritis but this is usually treated with at least ten days of antibiotics . Your urine culture can direct your antibiotic treatment.
9/22/07 hospitalized for epididymitis and orchitis-intense pain in lower abdomen, thought I was having appendicitis, given a scrotal ultrasound, possible cyst on epipdidymis. Left testicle had swollen up twice the size of right. Given dilotin, antibiotics, and percoset Approx. 10/10-Two week’s later-infection seemed to be clearing up, visited Dr.
This was not very nice and about 3 days after this I started experiencing an intense pain in my lower right abdomen. I was taken to hospital with suspected appendicitis and after a urine test, a blood test and a doctor feeling my appendix, I was sent home with some pain killers. 3 days later the same thing happened, and once again after another blood test, urine test and examination, I was sent home.
showed that I had borderline appendicitis due to the appendicitis not filling with the contrast fully and the mesenteric lymph nodes of the area being “shoddy”. I was given Cipro and Flagyl for two weeks to see if that would fight the infection. After an ultrasound, they found my appendix healed completely. While the yellow explosive diarrhea has returned to coming 2-3 times/week (rather than the daily occurances) the pain in my lower right abdomen and back continued at the same intensity.
The article went on commenting that MRI and CAT scans are among the biggest advances in diagnosis of TMD, that is just ludicrous.While those are valuable diagnostic tools they do not show what is the underlying cause of the misalignment. I frequently find that to be the malocclusion. Another statement that I found very irritating was " 80-90 % of the needed information can be obtained just by talking to the patient".
Well, I am all lathered up about people being told their neurologic symptoms are in their heads, caused by anxiety, or caused by hyper-awareness of our bodily sensations. It seems we have a new one almost every day. I consider this attitude by physicians to be one of two things. It is either pure arrogance such that if they don't know the answer then the patient must be weak-minded or it is a chauvinistic attitude toward women.
At 4 months post- treatment interstitial nephritis was diagnosed on renal biopsy (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was included in the differential diagnosis) and corticosteroid treatment was begun for the nephrotic syndrome. Hematologic Adverse Events Autoimmune thrombocytopenia: Patient 0002 was a 58 year-old man who received PEG-IFN 1 .O yglkg for 16 weeks. IFN was stopped when the platelet count dropped to 65x10' from 370x10' at baseline.
On December 2007 I had 2 ultrasounds done (pelvic & transvag). I had these tests done "just because" and as part of an annual physical. My Pap Smear came up normal ~ the ultrasound did not. "There are two right parauterine adnexal masses. The lowest mass is 7.3 cm in diameter. Separate and superior to this mass is a second lesion which measures 6.6 X 5.1 cm in diameter." "There are two complex parauterine masses which are worrisome for ovarian neoplasm.
So far there hasn't been one positive diagnosis and in some cases dentists have referred patients to oral surgeons for needless wisdom tooth extraction. While I'm not a medical doctor I can see there is a major problem with the medical profession in not treating the patient properly because I hate to say it but the medical profession has in this century turned into a billion dollar money making business.
I would suggest a 24 hrs urine test and a swab culture of the discharge to confirm the diagnosis. Urethritis is diagnosed by urethral swab culture and examination of the swab. Other test useful in diagnosis is digital rectal exam (DRE) to inspect the prostate gland for swelling or infection. It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided.
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