Angiogram procedure medications

Common Questions and Answers about Angiogram procedure medications

angiogram

Thanks for the info. An angiogram has been suggested more then likely I will have the proceedure, As someone said keeping still for several hours is the hardest part. My results were from a stress test,which I was able to do physically without pain, at the end I was out of breath but not breathing laboriously. If I could resolve this problem without surgery I would. Can that happen? Thru excercise and diet?
I perfectly understand your concern about the procedure since an angiogram is nonetheless, an invasive one. I'm also glad to hear that they finally know what was happening. I myself have not undergone an angiogram but with my experience in the clinics I maybe able to share with you some thoughts. The most dreaded complication of angiogram is bleeding from the puncture site (since they will insert a catheter right through your artery).
Procedure: Left Heart catheter Access: Right Femoral artery Catheters Used: 6 fr,JL4,JR4, Rcb,Im Cineagios: Left and right Coronaries Grafts Indication: Unstable Angina Complication: None (though I had a major allergy to something during the procedure, which become really apparent the day after) I was told it may have been angioderma Left Main Artery: Diffusely diseased - 90% distal stenosis LAD
I usually go to a cardiologist in another city. But my cardiologist could not perform my scheduled angiogram. My symptoms before this angiogram were chest pain with exertion of any kind. After this angiogram, I have had blood pressure problems, breathing problems, dry cough, shortness of breath and all the other symptoms that my cardiologist wanted me to do an angiogram for. He had said that if I needed an other stent put in. I would need a bypass even though I have small vessels.
18, Soft plaques seen in proximal LAD and D1 segment. ....You had a CT angiogram and included is a separate procedure a calcium score. The CT angiogram views the channel (lumen) of the vessels for any hard plaque buildup that would cause a narrowing of the vessel for blood flow and if serious could cause symptoms of chest pain, etc. Soft plaque resides between the layers of the vessel To add what others have said.
primary angioplasty to LAD i can see in the recent angiogram OMI ostioproximal 60%stenosis, OM2 normal whereas 9 years back angiogram report typed above says OM1 normal, major OM2 shows proximal eccentric 30% leison, is this a typo error of the hospital report am not sure. one more ques what does it mean when they say PDA PLV has diffuse disease?
What is the risk of doing this surgery without an angiogram?? What exactly will the angiogram tell? I am wondering if it has been found, either through clinical trials or studies, that MRI/MRA and Ultrasound are not very reliable indicators of the degree of stenosis??
I am a 54 year old male and had a heart attack late in December of 2005. An angiogram revealed a 90% blockage in my left anterior descending artery. The doctors put a catheter in my right femoral artery and put a Taxus stent in the blockage area. The area in my groin where they went into the femoral artery was tender and bruised for a couple of weeks (I understand this is normal), but seemed to heal fine.
I'm a 28 year old female, and I was just told I have suspected coronary artery disease. After a myriad of tests, angiogram (through the wrist) is my only option. I want to know about females here who have had angiograms and how they were. I'm actually petrified, and I'm supposed to go in two weeks. I know the risks are relatively low, but they stand out so much in my mind that I need to have some positive feedback here to help alleviate some of my fears... Thanks in advance!
After 4 days of medication in the hospital, he is referred to Angiogram. Please find the Angiogram report information stated below. Please check and confirm if he is required to undergo ByPass surgery or medication helps. He is diabetic and BP patient . Please advice..Thanks in advance. LCMA : Normal LAD Proximal : Type 3 vessel, 70% Lesion. Mid : Two Tandom Tight Lesions. Distal : Mild Disease. Diagonal : Tight Lesion.
Since we are speaking about the opinion on how risky is to stent it, my advise is to get a copy of the your angiography, (the video of the procedure in a CD) and try to get a second opinion from a hospital with large experience on that sort of intervention. Jesus.
Now have cardiomyopathy left side and lad is blocked again. My doctor will not do bypass only medications why?
If there is an allergic reaction to the medications or materials used it may cause joint pains post procedure. It could also be due to an infective pathology. The painful and swollen joint should be evaluated promptly to ensure there is no infectious or inflammatory process in the joint which could be treated. Please discuss this with your treating doctor am sure he will provide further assistance. Regards.
now he has some problem while walking and TMT test shows mild positive.if he will go for angiogram his creatinine will raise .what is the alternate solution for him.
In the end, however, it was a specific type of angiogram that ultimately confirmed my diagnosis of Coronary Microvascular Disease. I was given a Coronary Reactivity Test which is an angiography procedure specifically designed to examine the blood vessels in the heart and how they respond to different medications. Recently, both the Wall Street Journal and NPR posted some very convincing arguments as to why the traditional angiogram is no longer the ‘gold standard’ in heart testing.
It is unclear from the information provided whether she would benefit more from a stent or from treatment from medications alone without an angiogram. How each suspected blockage is managed is highly individualized to the patient. Angiograms with angioplasty and stenting, however, are generally well tolerated procedures and typically require only an overnight stay. Overall, the risks are very low from the procedure.
My husband underwent Radiofrequency catheter ablation four years ago to reset his heart rhythm due to atrial fibrillation. This procedure was a success. The only medication he now has to take is Cartia which is a blood pressure medicine and low dose aspirin. He is 64 years old and in good health. Would taking one of the drugs to treat ED, like Viagra or Cialis be harmful to him?
12/06/2013 09:08 End of procedure: 12/06/2013 09:35 Summary Data: Total Contrast: 105 mL, Isovue-370 (iopamidol) COMPLICATIONS IN LAB No Complications FINAL DIAGNOSIS One vessel CAD- CTO of RCA Normal LV systolic function RECOMMENDATIONS PCI of RCA The attending was present throughout the proced
I asked if there was another way to know if I had clogged arteries before he did the procedure, he said no. I checked and you can have a MRI or CT scan. Should I request these tests before they do the Catheterization?
My father is 69 years old. 3.5 years ago (spring 1996),he underwent an angiogram where it was detected that he has 40% blockage in the artery on the left side of his heart, very close to the main artery,and 60% and 50% blockage in two places in the right coronary artery. Since then, he has been aunder medication,and underwent 4 stress tests, one each year (autumn 1996,1997,1998 and 1999).
It means that there is a very small area of a previuos heart attack in your heart in the anteroapical portion (tip of the heart) with some small amount of low blood flow to the area that surrounds the dead muscle. Some elect to have an angiogram to further assess this. However, this is typically treated with medications and should not require any further studies unless you have severe symptoms such as exertional chest pain or shortness of breath.
the cardiologist diagnosed me with stable angina and upped my atenolol dose and he order an angiogram procedure for me. i am very anxious and i can not handle that type of invasive procedure. he told me that i could be at risk of a heart attack and himself and the nurses were upset at me that i declined the cath procedure. my question to you guys is..could my heart rate at 190 BMP have been svt or afib/flutter just mimicking ST elevation? can sinus tach get up to 190?
I was diagnosed with a hemangioma on left frontal lobe in 1985 by CT angiogram. It has not given me any problems until the past few months. I have had chronic, often debilitating headaches, blurred visioin, occasional loss of balance. The neurologist who diagnosed this stated it would eventually give me problmes and think that time has come. I can no longer stand these headaches. I take enough over the counter meds to acutally have right upper quadrant pain near location of liver.
Have you had an angiogram? If not, you need to do so. There may be other valves that are not showing up as bad on an echocardiogram. My mom's doctors thought that she only had two valves to replace and after the angiogram it showed three valves and three main arteries clogged. She only had days to live without surgery. Stop smoking, stop drinking and eat a healthy diet with very little salt. Reduce your fat and if you can stop eating red meat. Reduce your stress if possible.
Inflammation in the artery creates a place for the cholesterol to stick and build. The echocardiogram does not always show how severe the heart actually is. The angiogram procedure is best for finding out how much blockage there is in the arteries and to measure pressure in the heart valves. High blood pressure is a symptom that something is wrong with the heart.
1)I was interested in the Sinus Node Modification and was curious as to how successful this procedure was for Inappropiate Sinus Node Modification. I looked at alot of people's anwers on the heart forum for this procedure for IST who did not have that much success but I'm assuming the technology has improved for this procedure. 2)Since I had a echo and a ct angiography done which showed everything was normal, can I rule out any artery blockage that can be causing my pain in my left arm.
One way to do it is to have a catheterization, the other is to have a CT angiogram (non-invasive procedure) and the third is given that the area of ischemia is only 10% to proceed with medical management. I would start the ASA, beta blocker and the lipitor at least for now, and then get a second opinion. Maybe you could have a CT angiogram done to rule out significant CAD at which point you won't have to be on the ASA or the lipitor.
You most likely will be awake during the angiogram, but made to feel drowsy and relaxed with the help of medications. There is little pain associated with the procedure. With regards to the aspirin, this drug has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and the risk of coronary artery disease in a wide range of patients. You can discuss these specific dose with your doctor.
The differential diagnosis of BACNS, the diagnosis that could be mistaken for this condition, include reversible vasospasm due to medications (such as pseudoephedrine often used in cold medications, vasospasm related to pregnancy, exercise, cocaine use etc). Also, secondary types of angiitis such as lupus, infections, and several others. The differentiation between all the types of angiitis can be made based on blood tests and imaging in most cases, but sometimes brain biopsy is required.
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